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A psychometric analysis of the reading the mind in the eyes test: toward a brief form for research and applied settings.

Olderbak S, Wilhelm O, Olaru G, Geiger M, Brenneman MW, Roberts RD - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: We identified, and cross-validated in a second sample, an adequate short-form solution that is homogeneous with adequate internal consistency, and is moderately related to Cognitive Empathy, Emotion Perception, and strongly related to Vocabulary.We recommend the use of this short-form solution in normal adults as a more precise measure over the original version.Future revisions of the test should seek to reduce the test's reliance on one's vocabulary and evaluate the short-form structure in clinical populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Psychology and Pedagogy, Ulm University Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test is a popular measure of individual differences in Theory of Mind that is often applied in the assessment of particular clinical populations (primarily, individuals on the autism spectrum). However, little is known about the test's psychometric properties, including factor structure, internal consistency, and convergent validity evidence. We present a psychometric analysis of the test followed by an evaluation of other empirically proposed and statistically identified structures. We identified, and cross-validated in a second sample, an adequate short-form solution that is homogeneous with adequate internal consistency, and is moderately related to Cognitive Empathy, Emotion Perception, and strongly related to Vocabulary. We recommend the use of this short-form solution in normal adults as a more precise measure over the original version. Future revisions of the test should seek to reduce the test's reliance on one's vocabulary and evaluate the short-form structure in clinical populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study 1: Distribution of the tetrachoric correlations.
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Figure 1: Study 1: Distribution of the tetrachoric correlations.

Mentions: The tetrachoric correlations between items ranged from −0.28–0.41, with average inter-item correlation at 0.08, suggesting there is weak agreement between items, with many items negatively related to one another (interestingly, relations between those items that shared the same target word were also weak [Cautious; r = 0.08; Fantasizing: r = 0.28; Preoccupied: r = 0.16]). The average inter-item correlation, as well as the range of inter-item correlations, are outside the range recommended by Clark and Watson (1995) for sufficient internal consistency (recommended values range from 0.15 to 0.50). This pattern of correlations suggest that more than one factor might underlie the Eyes Test (Piedmont and Hyland, 1993; see Figure 1 for the distribution of correlations and Table A2 in Supplementary Materials for the full correlation matrix).


A psychometric analysis of the reading the mind in the eyes test: toward a brief form for research and applied settings.

Olderbak S, Wilhelm O, Olaru G, Geiger M, Brenneman MW, Roberts RD - Front Psychol (2015)

Study 1: Distribution of the tetrachoric correlations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593947&req=5

Figure 1: Study 1: Distribution of the tetrachoric correlations.
Mentions: The tetrachoric correlations between items ranged from −0.28–0.41, with average inter-item correlation at 0.08, suggesting there is weak agreement between items, with many items negatively related to one another (interestingly, relations between those items that shared the same target word were also weak [Cautious; r = 0.08; Fantasizing: r = 0.28; Preoccupied: r = 0.16]). The average inter-item correlation, as well as the range of inter-item correlations, are outside the range recommended by Clark and Watson (1995) for sufficient internal consistency (recommended values range from 0.15 to 0.50). This pattern of correlations suggest that more than one factor might underlie the Eyes Test (Piedmont and Hyland, 1993; see Figure 1 for the distribution of correlations and Table A2 in Supplementary Materials for the full correlation matrix).

Bottom Line: We identified, and cross-validated in a second sample, an adequate short-form solution that is homogeneous with adequate internal consistency, and is moderately related to Cognitive Empathy, Emotion Perception, and strongly related to Vocabulary.We recommend the use of this short-form solution in normal adults as a more precise measure over the original version.Future revisions of the test should seek to reduce the test's reliance on one's vocabulary and evaluate the short-form structure in clinical populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Psychology and Pedagogy, Ulm University Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test is a popular measure of individual differences in Theory of Mind that is often applied in the assessment of particular clinical populations (primarily, individuals on the autism spectrum). However, little is known about the test's psychometric properties, including factor structure, internal consistency, and convergent validity evidence. We present a psychometric analysis of the test followed by an evaluation of other empirically proposed and statistically identified structures. We identified, and cross-validated in a second sample, an adequate short-form solution that is homogeneous with adequate internal consistency, and is moderately related to Cognitive Empathy, Emotion Perception, and strongly related to Vocabulary. We recommend the use of this short-form solution in normal adults as a more precise measure over the original version. Future revisions of the test should seek to reduce the test's reliance on one's vocabulary and evaluate the short-form structure in clinical populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus