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The effect of magnocellular-based visual-motor intervention on Chinese children with developmental dyslexia.

Qian Y, Bi HY - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Magnocellular (M) deficit theory points out that the core deficit of developmental dyslexia (DD) is the impairment in M pathway, which has been evidenced in many previous studies.However, the number and reliability of these training studies were limited.It supported M deficit theory, and suggested M deficit might be the core deficit of Chinese DD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China ; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China.

ABSTRACT
Magnocellular (M) deficit theory points out that the core deficit of developmental dyslexia (DD) is the impairment in M pathway, which has been evidenced in many previous studies. Based on the M deficit, some researchers found that visual intervention focusing on M deficit improved dyslexics' M function as well as reading abilities. However, the number and reliability of these training studies were limited. Therefore, the present study conducted an M-based visual-motor intervention on Chinese children with DD to investigate the relationship between M deficit and Chinese DD. Intervention programs included coherent motion detection, visual search, visual tracking, and juggling, which were related to M function. The results showed that M function and phonological awareness of training dyslexic group were improved to a normal level as age-matched normal children after intervention, while non-training dyslexics did not. It supported M deficit theory, and suggested M deficit might be the core deficit of Chinese DD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The examples of visual search and visual tracking tasks. (A) The example of visual search; (B) The example of dynamic tracking; (C) The example of line puzzle (a task of static tracking); (D) The example of maze puzzle (a task of static tracking).
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Figure 1: The examples of visual search and visual tracking tasks. (A) The example of visual search; (B) The example of dynamic tracking; (C) The example of line puzzle (a task of static tracking); (D) The example of maze puzzle (a task of static tracking).

Mentions: Visual search and visual tracking tasks. The tasks focused on eye movement, object localization and visual spatial attention, which were the function of M pathway (Boden and Giaschi, 2007). These tasks were also involved in previous intervention studies (Solan et al., 2004; Lawton, 2011). (i) In the visual search task, participants were asked to search certain digits (0–9) rapidly and delete them in the sequence from small to large (i.e., 0, 1, 2, 3 ……9) on a paper of 100 digits. (ii) Visual tracking task included dynamic tracking and static tracking. In dynamic tracking task (12 trials), participants were required to gaze the moving object, pursuit its moving direction, and localize its final position. Static tracking task involved line puzzle (six trials) and maze puzzle (six trials). In the line puzzle task, participants were asked to follow the correct line to find the correct object in connection with the target; in the maze puzzle task, participants were required to find the correct path from entrance to exit. The paradigms of these tasks referred to a previous study (Yu et al., 2006) and the Internet (http://www.eyecanlearn.com/). Stimuli in visual search and static visual tracking were presented on papers, while stimuli in dynamic tracking were presented by the computer. The stimuli were different in each training session, and the examples were shown in Figure 1.


The effect of magnocellular-based visual-motor intervention on Chinese children with developmental dyslexia.

Qian Y, Bi HY - Front Psychol (2015)

The examples of visual search and visual tracking tasks. (A) The example of visual search; (B) The example of dynamic tracking; (C) The example of line puzzle (a task of static tracking); (D) The example of maze puzzle (a task of static tracking).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593944&req=5

Figure 1: The examples of visual search and visual tracking tasks. (A) The example of visual search; (B) The example of dynamic tracking; (C) The example of line puzzle (a task of static tracking); (D) The example of maze puzzle (a task of static tracking).
Mentions: Visual search and visual tracking tasks. The tasks focused on eye movement, object localization and visual spatial attention, which were the function of M pathway (Boden and Giaschi, 2007). These tasks were also involved in previous intervention studies (Solan et al., 2004; Lawton, 2011). (i) In the visual search task, participants were asked to search certain digits (0–9) rapidly and delete them in the sequence from small to large (i.e., 0, 1, 2, 3 ……9) on a paper of 100 digits. (ii) Visual tracking task included dynamic tracking and static tracking. In dynamic tracking task (12 trials), participants were required to gaze the moving object, pursuit its moving direction, and localize its final position. Static tracking task involved line puzzle (six trials) and maze puzzle (six trials). In the line puzzle task, participants were asked to follow the correct line to find the correct object in connection with the target; in the maze puzzle task, participants were required to find the correct path from entrance to exit. The paradigms of these tasks referred to a previous study (Yu et al., 2006) and the Internet (http://www.eyecanlearn.com/). Stimuli in visual search and static visual tracking were presented on papers, while stimuli in dynamic tracking were presented by the computer. The stimuli were different in each training session, and the examples were shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Magnocellular (M) deficit theory points out that the core deficit of developmental dyslexia (DD) is the impairment in M pathway, which has been evidenced in many previous studies.However, the number and reliability of these training studies were limited.It supported M deficit theory, and suggested M deficit might be the core deficit of Chinese DD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China ; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China.

ABSTRACT
Magnocellular (M) deficit theory points out that the core deficit of developmental dyslexia (DD) is the impairment in M pathway, which has been evidenced in many previous studies. Based on the M deficit, some researchers found that visual intervention focusing on M deficit improved dyslexics' M function as well as reading abilities. However, the number and reliability of these training studies were limited. Therefore, the present study conducted an M-based visual-motor intervention on Chinese children with DD to investigate the relationship between M deficit and Chinese DD. Intervention programs included coherent motion detection, visual search, visual tracking, and juggling, which were related to M function. The results showed that M function and phonological awareness of training dyslexic group were improved to a normal level as age-matched normal children after intervention, while non-training dyslexics did not. It supported M deficit theory, and suggested M deficit might be the core deficit of Chinese DD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus