Limits...
Cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric risks of varenicline: a retrospective cohort study.

Kotz D, Viechtbauer W, Simpson C, van Schayck OC, West R, Sheikh A - Lancet Respir Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Varenicline does not seem to be associated with an increased risk of documented cardiovascular events, depression, or self-harm when compared with NRT.Adverse events that do not come to attention of general practitioners cannot be excluded.These findings suggest an opportunity for physicians to prescribe varenicline more broadly, even for patients with comorbidities, thereby helping more smokers to quit successfully than do at present.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of General Practice, Medical Faculty of the Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany; Department of Family Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, Netherlands; Allergy and Respiratory Research Group, Centre for Medical Informatics, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address: daniel.kotz@med.uni-duesseldorf.de.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chartNRT=nicotine replacement treatment. PS=propensity score.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593936&req=5

fig1: Flow chartNRT=nicotine replacement treatment. PS=propensity score.

Mentions: We identified 164 766 patients who received prescriptions between Jan 1, 2007, and June 30, 2012, and included them in the analyses: 106 759 NRT users, 6557 bupropion users, and 51 450 varenicline users (figure). A few patients (125 [<1%] of 164 891 patients using NRT, bupropion, or varenicline) had missing data on the measure of socioeconomic status and we therefore excluded them. NRT users were older and more socioeconomically deprived than were bupropion and varenicline users, and showed a higher prevalence of all confounding factors (table 1). We noted the highest incidence of events for depression and ischaemic heart disease (table 2, appendix).


Cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric risks of varenicline: a retrospective cohort study.

Kotz D, Viechtbauer W, Simpson C, van Schayck OC, West R, Sheikh A - Lancet Respir Med (2015)

Flow chartNRT=nicotine replacement treatment. PS=propensity score.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593936&req=5

fig1: Flow chartNRT=nicotine replacement treatment. PS=propensity score.
Mentions: We identified 164 766 patients who received prescriptions between Jan 1, 2007, and June 30, 2012, and included them in the analyses: 106 759 NRT users, 6557 bupropion users, and 51 450 varenicline users (figure). A few patients (125 [<1%] of 164 891 patients using NRT, bupropion, or varenicline) had missing data on the measure of socioeconomic status and we therefore excluded them. NRT users were older and more socioeconomically deprived than were bupropion and varenicline users, and showed a higher prevalence of all confounding factors (table 1). We noted the highest incidence of events for depression and ischaemic heart disease (table 2, appendix).

Bottom Line: Varenicline does not seem to be associated with an increased risk of documented cardiovascular events, depression, or self-harm when compared with NRT.Adverse events that do not come to attention of general practitioners cannot be excluded.These findings suggest an opportunity for physicians to prescribe varenicline more broadly, even for patients with comorbidities, thereby helping more smokers to quit successfully than do at present.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of General Practice, Medical Faculty of the Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany; Department of Family Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, Netherlands; Allergy and Respiratory Research Group, Centre for Medical Informatics, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, London, UK. Electronic address: daniel.kotz@med.uni-duesseldorf.de.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus