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Asymmetry in the discrimination of quantity: The role of stimulus generalization.

Inman RA, Honey RC, Pearce JM - J Exp Psychol Anim Learn Cogn (2015)

Bottom Line: One group received a 20+/5- discrimination, with food signaled by 20 squares but not 5 squares; the other group received the opposite discrimination, 5+/20-.The 20+/5- discrimination was acquired more readily than 5+/20- in Experiments 1, 3a, 3b, and 4.The asymmetry in the acquisition of the magnitude discriminations in each experiment is attributed to inhibition being associated with the stimuli present during the ITI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Cardiff University.

No MeSH data available.


The stimuli for Experiments 3a and 3b (the figure is for illustrative purposes and does not depict accurately the images displayed to the pigeons).
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fig5: The stimuli for Experiments 3a and 3b (the figure is for illustrative purposes and does not depict accurately the images displayed to the pigeons).

Mentions: The two groups of Experiment 3 received the same discrimination training as for the previous experiments, except that the TV screen was entirely black during the ITI (see Figure 5). If generalization between the experimental stimuli and the cues present during the ITI is based on the dimension of brightness, then there will be more scope for generalization between the black TV screen of the ITI and the patterns containing 20 black squares, than the patterns containing 5 black squares. On this basis, therefore, the proposals of Kosaki et al. (2013) predict that a group receiving a 5+/20– discrimination will acquire it more readily than one receiving a 20+/5– discrimination. In other words, using a black screen during the ITI should reverse the asymmetry that was seen in Experiment 1, in much the same manner as the 288 black squares that were presented on the white screen during the ITI in Experiment 2. A different outcome is predicted if generalization between the stimuli used in the experiment is based on number. The absence of any small squares on the black screen during the ITI might result in it being treated as zero on the dimension of number and result in more generalization of inhibition from this cue to the patterns displaying 5 rather than 20 squares. As a consequence, despite the very different stimulation provided by the TV screen during the ITI in the present experiment, and Experiment 1, the outcome of both experiments is predicted to be the same. The 20+/5– group should acquire its discrimination more readily than the 5+/20– group.


Asymmetry in the discrimination of quantity: The role of stimulus generalization.

Inman RA, Honey RC, Pearce JM - J Exp Psychol Anim Learn Cogn (2015)

The stimuli for Experiments 3a and 3b (the figure is for illustrative purposes and does not depict accurately the images displayed to the pigeons).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593466&req=5

fig5: The stimuli for Experiments 3a and 3b (the figure is for illustrative purposes and does not depict accurately the images displayed to the pigeons).
Mentions: The two groups of Experiment 3 received the same discrimination training as for the previous experiments, except that the TV screen was entirely black during the ITI (see Figure 5). If generalization between the experimental stimuli and the cues present during the ITI is based on the dimension of brightness, then there will be more scope for generalization between the black TV screen of the ITI and the patterns containing 20 black squares, than the patterns containing 5 black squares. On this basis, therefore, the proposals of Kosaki et al. (2013) predict that a group receiving a 5+/20– discrimination will acquire it more readily than one receiving a 20+/5– discrimination. In other words, using a black screen during the ITI should reverse the asymmetry that was seen in Experiment 1, in much the same manner as the 288 black squares that were presented on the white screen during the ITI in Experiment 2. A different outcome is predicted if generalization between the stimuli used in the experiment is based on number. The absence of any small squares on the black screen during the ITI might result in it being treated as zero on the dimension of number and result in more generalization of inhibition from this cue to the patterns displaying 5 rather than 20 squares. As a consequence, despite the very different stimulation provided by the TV screen during the ITI in the present experiment, and Experiment 1, the outcome of both experiments is predicted to be the same. The 20+/5– group should acquire its discrimination more readily than the 5+/20– group.

Bottom Line: One group received a 20+/5- discrimination, with food signaled by 20 squares but not 5 squares; the other group received the opposite discrimination, 5+/20-.The 20+/5- discrimination was acquired more readily than 5+/20- in Experiments 1, 3a, 3b, and 4.The asymmetry in the acquisition of the magnitude discriminations in each experiment is attributed to inhibition being associated with the stimuli present during the ITI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Cardiff University.

No MeSH data available.