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Pacific Broad Tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus as a Causative Agent of Globally Reemerging Diphyllobothriosis.

Kuchta R, Serrano-Martínez ME, Scholz T - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: Diphyllobothrium pacificum) is the causative agent of the third most common fish-borne cestodosis among humans.Although most of the nearly 1,000 cases among humans have been reported in South America (Peru, Chile, and Ecuador), cases recently imported to Europe demonstrate the potential for spread of this tapeworm throughout the world as a result of global trade of fresh or chilled marine fish and travel or migration of humans.We provide a comprehensive survey of human cases of infection with this zoonotic parasite, summarize the history of this re-emerging disease, and identify marine fish species that may serve as a source of human infection when eaten raw or undercooked.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The Pacific broad tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus (syn. Diphyllobothrium pacificum) is the causative agent of the third most common fish-borne cestodosis among humans. Although most of the nearly 1,000 cases among humans have been reported in South America (Peru, Chile, and Ecuador), cases recently imported to Europe demonstrate the potential for spread of this tapeworm throughout the world as a result of global trade of fresh or chilled marine fish and travel or migration of humans. We provide a comprehensive survey of human cases of infection with this zoonotic parasite, summarize the history of this re-emerging disease, and identify marine fish species that may serve as a source of human infection when eaten raw or undercooked.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of the Pacific broad tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus among humans and wild animals on the A) northern and B) southern Pacific coast of South America.
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Figure 1: Distribution of the Pacific broad tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus among humans and wild animals on the A) northern and B) southern Pacific coast of South America.

Mentions: The first archeological records of A. pacificus found in coprolites were from the coastal site of Los Gavilanes in Peru, dated from 2850 to 2700 bce (7), and from the site of Tiliviche in northern Chile (Iquique), with Chinchorro culture dating from 4110 to 1950 BCE (8) (Figure 1). The latter site lies 40 km from the Pacific coast at an altitude of 950 meters, which may demonstrate that diphyllobothriosis was not limited to the coastal areas, either as a result of import of marine fish or movement of infected persons from the coast (8,9). The presence of A. pacificus eggs were then confirmed in other mummified bodies of humans in Chinchorro, dated 3050–2050 bce (10). (Figure 1).


Pacific Broad Tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus as a Causative Agent of Globally Reemerging Diphyllobothriosis.

Kuchta R, Serrano-Martínez ME, Scholz T - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2015)

Distribution of the Pacific broad tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus among humans and wild animals on the A) northern and B) southern Pacific coast of South America.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593442&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of the Pacific broad tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus among humans and wild animals on the A) northern and B) southern Pacific coast of South America.
Mentions: The first archeological records of A. pacificus found in coprolites were from the coastal site of Los Gavilanes in Peru, dated from 2850 to 2700 bce (7), and from the site of Tiliviche in northern Chile (Iquique), with Chinchorro culture dating from 4110 to 1950 BCE (8) (Figure 1). The latter site lies 40 km from the Pacific coast at an altitude of 950 meters, which may demonstrate that diphyllobothriosis was not limited to the coastal areas, either as a result of import of marine fish or movement of infected persons from the coast (8,9). The presence of A. pacificus eggs were then confirmed in other mummified bodies of humans in Chinchorro, dated 3050–2050 bce (10). (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Diphyllobothrium pacificum) is the causative agent of the third most common fish-borne cestodosis among humans.Although most of the nearly 1,000 cases among humans have been reported in South America (Peru, Chile, and Ecuador), cases recently imported to Europe demonstrate the potential for spread of this tapeworm throughout the world as a result of global trade of fresh or chilled marine fish and travel or migration of humans.We provide a comprehensive survey of human cases of infection with this zoonotic parasite, summarize the history of this re-emerging disease, and identify marine fish species that may serve as a source of human infection when eaten raw or undercooked.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The Pacific broad tapeworm Adenocephalus pacificus (syn. Diphyllobothrium pacificum) is the causative agent of the third most common fish-borne cestodosis among humans. Although most of the nearly 1,000 cases among humans have been reported in South America (Peru, Chile, and Ecuador), cases recently imported to Europe demonstrate the potential for spread of this tapeworm throughout the world as a result of global trade of fresh or chilled marine fish and travel or migration of humans. We provide a comprehensive survey of human cases of infection with this zoonotic parasite, summarize the history of this re-emerging disease, and identify marine fish species that may serve as a source of human infection when eaten raw or undercooked.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus