Limits...
The updated incidences and mortalities of major cancers in China, 2011.

Chen W, Zheng R, Zeng H, Zhang S - Chin J Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: All incidences and mortalities were age-standardized to the 2000 Chinese standard population and Segi's population.The crude incidence was 250.28/1,00,000 (277.77/1,00,000 for males and 221.37/1,00,000 for females).The ASRs of incidence by the Chinese standard population (ASRIC) and by the world standard population (ASRIW) were 186.34/1,00,000 and 182.76/1,00,000, respectively, with a cumulative incidence (0-74 years old) of 21.20%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Office for Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Center, Beijing, 100021, P. R. China. chenwq@cicams.ac.cn.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) of China collected population-based cancer registration data from all cancer registries in China. This study aimed to compile national cancer incidences and mortalities in 2011 and estimate cancer incident new cases and cancer deaths.

Methods: In 2014, there were 234 cancer registries that submitted records of new cancer cases and cancer deaths that occurred in 2011 to the NCCR. All datasets were evaluated based on the criteria of data quality of the NCCR. The data of 177 registries was of sufficient quality and was compiled to evaluate cancer statistics in 2011. The pooled data were stratified by area, sex, age group, and cancer type. Cancer incident cases and deaths were estimated using age-standardized rates (ASR) and the Chinese population. All incidences and mortalities were age-standardized to the 2000 Chinese standard population and Segi's population.

Results: The estimates of new cancer incident cases and cancer deaths were 3,372,175 and 2,113,048 in 2011, respectively. The crude incidence was 250.28/1,00,000 (277.77/1,00,000 for males and 221.37/1,00,000 for females). The ASRs of incidence by the Chinese standard population (ASRIC) and by the world standard population (ASRIW) were 186.34/1,00,000 and 182.76/1,00,000, respectively, with a cumulative incidence (0-74 years old) of 21.20%. Cancers of the lung, female breast, stomach, liver, colorectum, esophagus, cervix, uterus, prostate, and ovary were the most common cancers, accounting for approximately 75% of all new cancer cases. Lung, liver, gastric, esophageal, colorectal, female breast, pancreatic, brain, and cervical cancers and leukemia were the leading causes of cancer death, accounting for approximately 80% of all cancer deaths. Cancer incidence, mortality, and spectrum were all different between urban and rural areas and between males and females.

Conclusions: The population covered by the cancer registries greatly increased from 2010 to 2011. The data quality and representativeness of cancer registries have gradually improved. Cancer registries have an irreplaceable role in research on cancer prevention and control. The disease burden of cancer is increasing, and the health department must implement effective measures to contain the increased cancer burden in China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cancer incidences and mortalities in urban and rural areas for females in China, 2011 (1/1,00,000).
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593358&req=5

Fig3: Cancer incidences and mortalities in urban and rural areas for females in China, 2011 (1/1,00,000).

Mentions: Lung cancer was the most common cancer in all areas, followed by female breast, gastric, liver, and colorectal cancers, with estimated new cases of 651,053, 248,620, 420,489, 355,595, and 310,244 in 2011, respectively. Lung cancer was the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males, followed by gastric, liver, esophageal, and colorectal cancers; breast cancer was the most common cancer in females, followed by lung, colorectal, gastric, and liver cancers (Table 3). The 10 most common cancers accounted for approximately 75% of all cancer cases (Figure 1). In urban areas, lung cancer was the most frequently diagnosed cancer (3,41,543 estimated new cases with an incidence of 49.44/1,00,000), followed by female breast, colorectal, gastric, and liver cancer; in rural areas, lung cancer was the most frequently diagnosed cancer (3,09,510 estimated new cases with an incidence of 47.14/1,00,000), followed by gastric, esophageal, liver, and colorectal cancers (Figures 2, 3).Table 3


The updated incidences and mortalities of major cancers in China, 2011.

Chen W, Zheng R, Zeng H, Zhang S - Chin J Cancer (2015)

Cancer incidences and mortalities in urban and rural areas for females in China, 2011 (1/1,00,000).
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593358&req=5

Fig3: Cancer incidences and mortalities in urban and rural areas for females in China, 2011 (1/1,00,000).
Mentions: Lung cancer was the most common cancer in all areas, followed by female breast, gastric, liver, and colorectal cancers, with estimated new cases of 651,053, 248,620, 420,489, 355,595, and 310,244 in 2011, respectively. Lung cancer was the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males, followed by gastric, liver, esophageal, and colorectal cancers; breast cancer was the most common cancer in females, followed by lung, colorectal, gastric, and liver cancers (Table 3). The 10 most common cancers accounted for approximately 75% of all cancer cases (Figure 1). In urban areas, lung cancer was the most frequently diagnosed cancer (3,41,543 estimated new cases with an incidence of 49.44/1,00,000), followed by female breast, colorectal, gastric, and liver cancer; in rural areas, lung cancer was the most frequently diagnosed cancer (3,09,510 estimated new cases with an incidence of 47.14/1,00,000), followed by gastric, esophageal, liver, and colorectal cancers (Figures 2, 3).Table 3

Bottom Line: All incidences and mortalities were age-standardized to the 2000 Chinese standard population and Segi's population.The crude incidence was 250.28/1,00,000 (277.77/1,00,000 for males and 221.37/1,00,000 for females).The ASRs of incidence by the Chinese standard population (ASRIC) and by the world standard population (ASRIW) were 186.34/1,00,000 and 182.76/1,00,000, respectively, with a cumulative incidence (0-74 years old) of 21.20%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Office for Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Center, Beijing, 100021, P. R. China. chenwq@cicams.ac.cn.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) of China collected population-based cancer registration data from all cancer registries in China. This study aimed to compile national cancer incidences and mortalities in 2011 and estimate cancer incident new cases and cancer deaths.

Methods: In 2014, there were 234 cancer registries that submitted records of new cancer cases and cancer deaths that occurred in 2011 to the NCCR. All datasets were evaluated based on the criteria of data quality of the NCCR. The data of 177 registries was of sufficient quality and was compiled to evaluate cancer statistics in 2011. The pooled data were stratified by area, sex, age group, and cancer type. Cancer incident cases and deaths were estimated using age-standardized rates (ASR) and the Chinese population. All incidences and mortalities were age-standardized to the 2000 Chinese standard population and Segi's population.

Results: The estimates of new cancer incident cases and cancer deaths were 3,372,175 and 2,113,048 in 2011, respectively. The crude incidence was 250.28/1,00,000 (277.77/1,00,000 for males and 221.37/1,00,000 for females). The ASRs of incidence by the Chinese standard population (ASRIC) and by the world standard population (ASRIW) were 186.34/1,00,000 and 182.76/1,00,000, respectively, with a cumulative incidence (0-74 years old) of 21.20%. Cancers of the lung, female breast, stomach, liver, colorectum, esophagus, cervix, uterus, prostate, and ovary were the most common cancers, accounting for approximately 75% of all new cancer cases. Lung, liver, gastric, esophageal, colorectal, female breast, pancreatic, brain, and cervical cancers and leukemia were the leading causes of cancer death, accounting for approximately 80% of all cancer deaths. Cancer incidence, mortality, and spectrum were all different between urban and rural areas and between males and females.

Conclusions: The population covered by the cancer registries greatly increased from 2010 to 2011. The data quality and representativeness of cancer registries have gradually improved. Cancer registries have an irreplaceable role in research on cancer prevention and control. The disease burden of cancer is increasing, and the health department must implement effective measures to contain the increased cancer burden in China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus