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Global, regional and national consumption of major food groups in 1990 and 2010: a systematic analysis including 266 country-specific nutrition surveys worldwide.

Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Shi P, Andrews KG, Engell RE, Mozaffarian D, Global Burden of Diseases Nutrition and Chronic Diseases Expert Group (NutriCoD - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Intakes were generally similar by sex.Vegetable, seafood and processed meat intakes were stable over time; fruits, nuts/seeds and red meat, increased; and whole grains, decreased.These global dietary data by nation, age and sex identify key challenges and opportunities for optimising diets, informing policies and priorities for improving global health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Global and regional mean fruit (A), vegetable (B), nut and seed (C), and whole grain (D) intake in 1990 and 2010, for adults ≥20 years of age in relation to their uncertainty.
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BMJOPEN2015008705F5: Global and regional mean fruit (A), vegetable (B), nut and seed (C), and whole grain (D) intake in 1990 and 2010, for adults ≥20 years of age in relation to their uncertainty.

Mentions: In 2010, mean global fruit consumption in adults was 81.3 g/day (95% UI 78.9–83.7; table 3 and figure 2), yet with 6-fold variation across 21 world regions (from 27.6 to 169.9 g/day; figure 5) and 17-fold variation across 187 countries (from 19.2 to 325.1 g/day). Highest intakes were identified in Jamaica, Malaysia, Jordan, Greece and New Zealand (see eTable 3); and lowest intakes in Ethiopia, Nepal, India, Vanuatu and Pakistan. Only 2 of 187 countries, Jamaica and Malaysia, representing roughly 19 million adults (0.4% of the global adult population), had mean consumption ≥300 g/day.


Global, regional and national consumption of major food groups in 1990 and 2010: a systematic analysis including 266 country-specific nutrition surveys worldwide.

Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Shi P, Andrews KG, Engell RE, Mozaffarian D, Global Burden of Diseases Nutrition and Chronic Diseases Expert Group (NutriCoD - BMJ Open (2015)

Global and regional mean fruit (A), vegetable (B), nut and seed (C), and whole grain (D) intake in 1990 and 2010, for adults ≥20 years of age in relation to their uncertainty.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593162&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008705F5: Global and regional mean fruit (A), vegetable (B), nut and seed (C), and whole grain (D) intake in 1990 and 2010, for adults ≥20 years of age in relation to their uncertainty.
Mentions: In 2010, mean global fruit consumption in adults was 81.3 g/day (95% UI 78.9–83.7; table 3 and figure 2), yet with 6-fold variation across 21 world regions (from 27.6 to 169.9 g/day; figure 5) and 17-fold variation across 187 countries (from 19.2 to 325.1 g/day). Highest intakes were identified in Jamaica, Malaysia, Jordan, Greece and New Zealand (see eTable 3); and lowest intakes in Ethiopia, Nepal, India, Vanuatu and Pakistan. Only 2 of 187 countries, Jamaica and Malaysia, representing roughly 19 million adults (0.4% of the global adult population), had mean consumption ≥300 g/day.

Bottom Line: Intakes were generally similar by sex.Vegetable, seafood and processed meat intakes were stable over time; fruits, nuts/seeds and red meat, increased; and whole grains, decreased.These global dietary data by nation, age and sex identify key challenges and opportunities for optimising diets, informing policies and priorities for improving global health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

No MeSH data available.