Limits...
Effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on mesenteric perfusion in experimental induced intestinal ischemia in a porcine model.

Pavoni V, Nicoletti P, Benemei S, Materazzi S, Perna F, Romagnoli S, Chelazzi C, Zagli G, Coratti A - Heart Lung Vessel (2015)

Bottom Line: Fourteen male domestic pigs (≈10 Kg) were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated.After mini-laparotomy, each animal received incremental doses of sodium hydrogen sulfide every 20 minutes.Sodium hydrogen sulfide did not directly or indirectly (by blood flow redistribution) affect the sternal skin microcirculation, heart rates, or mean arterial pressure, suggesting a tissue-specific micro-vascular action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesia, Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Florence, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Insufficient mesenteric perfusion is a dramatic complication in critically ill patients. Hydrogen sulfide, a newly recognized endogenous gaseous mediator, acts as an intestinal vasoactive agent and seems to protect against mesenteric ischemic damage. We investigated whether sodium hydrogen sulfide, a hydrogen sulfide donor, can improve mesenteric perfusion in an experimental model of pigs, both in physiological and ischemic conditions.

Methods: The study was conducted at Careggi University Hospital (Florence, IT). Fourteen male domestic pigs (≈10 Kg) were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Animals were randomized in control and ischemia groups. Mesenteric ischemia was induced with a positive end-expiratory pressure of 15 cmH2O. After mini-laparotomy, each animal received incremental doses of sodium hydrogen sulfide every 20 minutes. Perfusion of both the jejunal mucosa and sternal skin were measured by laser Doppler flowmeter, and systemic hemodynamic parameters were monitored.

Results: In the control group, sodium hydrogen sulfide was able to significantly improve the mesenteric perfusion, showing a 50% increase from the baseline blood flow. In the ischemia group, NaHS-induced a two-fold increase of the mesenteric post-ischemic perfusion with a recovery up to 70% of pre- positive end-expiratory pressure mesenteric blood flow. Sodium hydrogen sulfide did not directly or indirectly (by blood flow redistribution) affect the sternal skin microcirculation, heart rates, or mean arterial pressure, suggesting a tissue-specific micro-vascular action.

Conclusions: In a porcine model, we observed a mesenteric perfusion recovery mediated by administration of hydrogen sulfide donor without affecting general hemodynamic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study protocol. Each point time represent the timing of data collection.Panel A: control animals.Panel B: ischemia-induced animals. PEEP ventilation has been fixed at 15 cm H2O and 40 minutes have been waited for the stabilization of hemodynamic parameters of the animal.PEEP = positive end-expiratory pressure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593018&req=5

Figure 001: Study protocol. Each point time represent the timing of data collection.Panel A: control animals.Panel B: ischemia-induced animals. PEEP ventilation has been fixed at 15 cm H2O and 40 minutes have been waited for the stabilization of hemodynamic parameters of the animal.PEEP = positive end-expiratory pressure.


Effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on mesenteric perfusion in experimental induced intestinal ischemia in a porcine model.

Pavoni V, Nicoletti P, Benemei S, Materazzi S, Perna F, Romagnoli S, Chelazzi C, Zagli G, Coratti A - Heart Lung Vessel (2015)

Study protocol. Each point time represent the timing of data collection.Panel A: control animals.Panel B: ischemia-induced animals. PEEP ventilation has been fixed at 15 cm H2O and 40 minutes have been waited for the stabilization of hemodynamic parameters of the animal.PEEP = positive end-expiratory pressure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4593018&req=5

Figure 001: Study protocol. Each point time represent the timing of data collection.Panel A: control animals.Panel B: ischemia-induced animals. PEEP ventilation has been fixed at 15 cm H2O and 40 minutes have been waited for the stabilization of hemodynamic parameters of the animal.PEEP = positive end-expiratory pressure.
Bottom Line: Fourteen male domestic pigs (≈10 Kg) were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated.After mini-laparotomy, each animal received incremental doses of sodium hydrogen sulfide every 20 minutes.Sodium hydrogen sulfide did not directly or indirectly (by blood flow redistribution) affect the sternal skin microcirculation, heart rates, or mean arterial pressure, suggesting a tissue-specific micro-vascular action.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesia, Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Florence, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Insufficient mesenteric perfusion is a dramatic complication in critically ill patients. Hydrogen sulfide, a newly recognized endogenous gaseous mediator, acts as an intestinal vasoactive agent and seems to protect against mesenteric ischemic damage. We investigated whether sodium hydrogen sulfide, a hydrogen sulfide donor, can improve mesenteric perfusion in an experimental model of pigs, both in physiological and ischemic conditions.

Methods: The study was conducted at Careggi University Hospital (Florence, IT). Fourteen male domestic pigs (≈10 Kg) were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Animals were randomized in control and ischemia groups. Mesenteric ischemia was induced with a positive end-expiratory pressure of 15 cmH2O. After mini-laparotomy, each animal received incremental doses of sodium hydrogen sulfide every 20 minutes. Perfusion of both the jejunal mucosa and sternal skin were measured by laser Doppler flowmeter, and systemic hemodynamic parameters were monitored.

Results: In the control group, sodium hydrogen sulfide was able to significantly improve the mesenteric perfusion, showing a 50% increase from the baseline blood flow. In the ischemia group, NaHS-induced a two-fold increase of the mesenteric post-ischemic perfusion with a recovery up to 70% of pre- positive end-expiratory pressure mesenteric blood flow. Sodium hydrogen sulfide did not directly or indirectly (by blood flow redistribution) affect the sternal skin microcirculation, heart rates, or mean arterial pressure, suggesting a tissue-specific micro-vascular action.

Conclusions: In a porcine model, we observed a mesenteric perfusion recovery mediated by administration of hydrogen sulfide donor without affecting general hemodynamic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus