Limits...
Periodic Breathing and Behavioral Awakenings at High Altitude.

Shogilev DJ, Tanner JB, Chang Y, Harris NS - Sleep Disord (2015)

Bottom Line: At high altitude, 10.5% (95% CI 6.5-14.6%) of total sleep time was spent in PB while 15 out of 50 awakenings (30%, 95% CI: 18-45%) occurring at high altitudes were associated with PB (P < 0.001).Conclusions.Our data reveals a higher than expected number of behavioral awakenings associated with PB compared to what would be expected by chance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Emergency Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. To study the relationship between nocturnal periodic breathing episodes and behavioral awakenings at high altitude. Methods. Observational study. It is 6-day ascent of 4 healthy subjects from Besisahar (760 meters) to Manang (3540 meters) in Nepal in March 2012. A recording pulse oximeter was worn by each subject to measure their oxygen saturation and the presence of periodic breathing continuously through the night. An actigraph was simultaneously worn in order to determine nocturnal behavioral awakenings. There were no interventions. Results. 187-hour sleep at high altitude was analyzed, and of this, 145 hours (78%) had at least one PB event. At high altitude, 10.5% (95% CI 6.5-14.6%) of total sleep time was spent in PB while 15 out of 50 awakenings (30%, 95% CI: 18-45%) occurring at high altitudes were associated with PB (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our data reveals a higher than expected number of behavioral awakenings associated with PB compared to what would be expected by chance. This suggests that PB likely plays a role in behavioral awakenings at high altitude.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ascent profile.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592922&req=5

fig1: Ascent profile.

Mentions: To test this hypothesis we performed nocturnal measurements of PB and wakefulness of four trekkers during a 6-day ascent from 760 meters to 3540 meters. This prospective study was carried out by medically savvy volunteers in March 2012. Table 1 shows the demographic profile of the four trekkers. The starting point of the trek was at Besisahar at an altitude of 760 meters. The peak altitude was reached on day 6 at Manang (3540 meters). The trekkers were monitored for 4 additional nights at this peak altitude. Figure 1 shows the complete ascent profile.


Periodic Breathing and Behavioral Awakenings at High Altitude.

Shogilev DJ, Tanner JB, Chang Y, Harris NS - Sleep Disord (2015)

Ascent profile.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592922&req=5

fig1: Ascent profile.
Mentions: To test this hypothesis we performed nocturnal measurements of PB and wakefulness of four trekkers during a 6-day ascent from 760 meters to 3540 meters. This prospective study was carried out by medically savvy volunteers in March 2012. Table 1 shows the demographic profile of the four trekkers. The starting point of the trek was at Besisahar at an altitude of 760 meters. The peak altitude was reached on day 6 at Manang (3540 meters). The trekkers were monitored for 4 additional nights at this peak altitude. Figure 1 shows the complete ascent profile.

Bottom Line: At high altitude, 10.5% (95% CI 6.5-14.6%) of total sleep time was spent in PB while 15 out of 50 awakenings (30%, 95% CI: 18-45%) occurring at high altitudes were associated with PB (P < 0.001).Conclusions.Our data reveals a higher than expected number of behavioral awakenings associated with PB compared to what would be expected by chance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Emergency Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. To study the relationship between nocturnal periodic breathing episodes and behavioral awakenings at high altitude. Methods. Observational study. It is 6-day ascent of 4 healthy subjects from Besisahar (760 meters) to Manang (3540 meters) in Nepal in March 2012. A recording pulse oximeter was worn by each subject to measure their oxygen saturation and the presence of periodic breathing continuously through the night. An actigraph was simultaneously worn in order to determine nocturnal behavioral awakenings. There were no interventions. Results. 187-hour sleep at high altitude was analyzed, and of this, 145 hours (78%) had at least one PB event. At high altitude, 10.5% (95% CI 6.5-14.6%) of total sleep time was spent in PB while 15 out of 50 awakenings (30%, 95% CI: 18-45%) occurring at high altitudes were associated with PB (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our data reveals a higher than expected number of behavioral awakenings associated with PB compared to what would be expected by chance. This suggests that PB likely plays a role in behavioral awakenings at high altitude.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus