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Chinese Herbal Bath Therapy for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Chen B, Zhan H, Chung M, Lin X, Zhang M, Pang J, Wang C - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Results from meta-analysis showed superior pain improvement (mean difference = -0.59 points; 95% confidence intervals [CI], -0.83 to -0.36; p < 0.00001) and higher total effectiveness rate (risk ratio = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.28; p < 0.00001) when compared with standard western treatment.No serious adverse events were reported.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Orthopedics & Traumatology, Shuguang Hospital affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
Objective. Chinese herbal bath therapy (CHBT) has traditionally been considered to have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. We conducted the first meta-analysis evaluating its benefits for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. We searched three English and four Chinese databases through October, 2014. Randomized trials evaluating at least 2 weeks of CHBT for knee OA were selected. The effects of CHBT on clinical symptoms included both pain level (via the visual analog scale) and total effectiveness rate, which assessed pain, physical performance, and wellness. We performed random-effects meta-analyses using mean difference. Results. Fifteen studies totaling 1618 subjects met eligibility criteria. Bath prescription included, on average, 13 Chinese herbs with directions to steam and wash around the knee for 20-40 minutes once or twice daily. Mean treatment duration was 3 weeks. Results from meta-analysis showed superior pain improvement (mean difference = -0.59 points; 95% confidence intervals [CI], -0.83 to -0.36; p < 0.00001) and higher total effectiveness rate (risk ratio = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.28; p < 0.00001) when compared with standard western treatment. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Chinese herbal bath therapy may be a safe, effective, and simple alternative treatment modality for knee OA. Further rigorously designed, randomized trials are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk of bias for randomized, controlled trials (n = 15).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig4: Risk of bias for randomized, controlled trials (n = 15).

Mentions: The quality assessment of the trials was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The detailed results are presented in Figure 4. The overall quality of trials was moderate. Randomization was adequate in 4 trials (26.7%) and unclear in 11 trials (73%). All studies reported the similarity of study groups at baseline (100%). Outcome assessors blinded in 1 trials (6.7%), unclear in 14 trials (93.3%). The bias of blinding to patients, allocation concealment, and intention to treat items were similarly difficult to assess from reported information.


Chinese Herbal Bath Therapy for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Chen B, Zhan H, Chung M, Lin X, Zhang M, Pang J, Wang C - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Risk of bias for randomized, controlled trials (n = 15).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592903&req=5

fig4: Risk of bias for randomized, controlled trials (n = 15).
Mentions: The quality assessment of the trials was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The detailed results are presented in Figure 4. The overall quality of trials was moderate. Randomization was adequate in 4 trials (26.7%) and unclear in 11 trials (73%). All studies reported the similarity of study groups at baseline (100%). Outcome assessors blinded in 1 trials (6.7%), unclear in 14 trials (93.3%). The bias of blinding to patients, allocation concealment, and intention to treat items were similarly difficult to assess from reported information.

Bottom Line: Results from meta-analysis showed superior pain improvement (mean difference = -0.59 points; 95% confidence intervals [CI], -0.83 to -0.36; p < 0.00001) and higher total effectiveness rate (risk ratio = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.28; p < 0.00001) when compared with standard western treatment.No serious adverse events were reported.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Orthopedics & Traumatology, Shuguang Hospital affiliated to Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT
Objective. Chinese herbal bath therapy (CHBT) has traditionally been considered to have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. We conducted the first meta-analysis evaluating its benefits for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. We searched three English and four Chinese databases through October, 2014. Randomized trials evaluating at least 2 weeks of CHBT for knee OA were selected. The effects of CHBT on clinical symptoms included both pain level (via the visual analog scale) and total effectiveness rate, which assessed pain, physical performance, and wellness. We performed random-effects meta-analyses using mean difference. Results. Fifteen studies totaling 1618 subjects met eligibility criteria. Bath prescription included, on average, 13 Chinese herbs with directions to steam and wash around the knee for 20-40 minutes once or twice daily. Mean treatment duration was 3 weeks. Results from meta-analysis showed superior pain improvement (mean difference = -0.59 points; 95% confidence intervals [CI], -0.83 to -0.36; p < 0.00001) and higher total effectiveness rate (risk ratio = 1.21; 95% CI, 1.15 to 1.28; p < 0.00001) when compared with standard western treatment. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion. Chinese herbal bath therapy may be a safe, effective, and simple alternative treatment modality for knee OA. Further rigorously designed, randomized trials are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus