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Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience.

Bonett J - J Med Radiat Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: The responses were dichotomised to 'positive' or 'negative'.Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays.The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients.

Methods: Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to 'positive' or 'negative'. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays.

Results: The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients' experiences during radiation therapy treatment.

Conclusion: The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

No MeSH data available.


Radiation therapy bunker with the night theme ceiling art (SUN2).
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fig02: Radiation therapy bunker with the night theme ceiling art (SUN2).

Mentions: A healing and hopeful environment can be created for both patients and staff, which ultimately creates a positive distraction. Further, this has downstream implications in providing positive branding of a specific centre or environment. Becker et al.4 found that, in patient-centred facilities, patients perceived their care to be significantly better when their interaction with staff was perceived to be of greater quality. This was associated with more positive environmental appraisals, improved mood, an altered physiological state and greater reported satisfaction by the patients.5 This formed the basis of a new initiative at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre (SHRTC), where considerations were made to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. Within SHRTC both the computed tomography (CT) rooms and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to have ceiling art that replicated a number of different visual scenes. These scenes included blue skies with surrounding trees (Fig.1) and night scenes with images representing the external environment (Fig.2). Beukeboom et al.6 found that patients exposed to natural elements, such as real plants or images of natural surrounds, during their time in patient waiting rooms, reported lower levels of stress compared to those who were not exposed to any form of nature.


Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience.

Bonett J - J Med Radiat Sci (2015)

Radiation therapy bunker with the night theme ceiling art (SUN2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592673&req=5

fig02: Radiation therapy bunker with the night theme ceiling art (SUN2).
Mentions: A healing and hopeful environment can be created for both patients and staff, which ultimately creates a positive distraction. Further, this has downstream implications in providing positive branding of a specific centre or environment. Becker et al.4 found that, in patient-centred facilities, patients perceived their care to be significantly better when their interaction with staff was perceived to be of greater quality. This was associated with more positive environmental appraisals, improved mood, an altered physiological state and greater reported satisfaction by the patients.5 This formed the basis of a new initiative at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre (SHRTC), where considerations were made to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. Within SHRTC both the computed tomography (CT) rooms and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to have ceiling art that replicated a number of different visual scenes. These scenes included blue skies with surrounding trees (Fig.1) and night scenes with images representing the external environment (Fig.2). Beukeboom et al.6 found that patients exposed to natural elements, such as real plants or images of natural surrounds, during their time in patient waiting rooms, reported lower levels of stress compared to those who were not exposed to any form of nature.

Bottom Line: The responses were dichotomised to 'positive' or 'negative'.Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays.The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients.

Methods: Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to 'positive' or 'negative'. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays.

Results: The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients' experiences during radiation therapy treatment.

Conclusion: The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

No MeSH data available.