Limits...
Preference of Diamondback Moth Larvae for Novel and Original Host Plant after Host Range Expansion.

Henniges-Janssen K, Heckel DG, Groot AT - Insects (2014)

Bottom Line: Here we examine larval preference for the novel host plant.However, pea-adapted larvae, which were reared on cabbage, also preferred cabbage.Thus both genetic differences and previous exposure affect larval host choice, while adult choice for the novel host has not yet evolved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knöll-Str. 8, Jena 07745, Germany. kjanssen@ice.mpg.de.

ABSTRACT
Utilization of a novel plant host by herbivorous insects requires coordination of numerous physiological and behavioral adaptations in both larvae and adults. The recent host range expansion of the crucifer-specialist diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), to the sugar pea crop in Kenya provides an opportunity to study this process in action. Previous studies have shown that larval ability to grow and complete development on sugar pea is genetically based, but that females of the pea-adapted strain do not prefer to oviposit on pea. Here we examine larval preference for the novel host plant. Larvae of the newly evolved pea-adapted host strain were offered the choice of the novel host plant sugar pea and the original host cabbage. These larvae significantly preferred pea, while in contrast, all larvae of a cabbage-adapted DBM strain preferred cabbage. However, pea-adapted larvae, which were reared on cabbage, also preferred cabbage. Thus both genetic differences and previous exposure affect larval host choice, while adult choice for the novel host has not yet evolved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental set-up of larval feeding choice assay. Pea and cabbage leaf discs were offered in an alternate order and a fourth-instar larva was placed in the middle of the Petri dish. The positions of larva were recorded after 5 min, 30 min, 6 h and 12 h, and percentage of consumed leaf area was recorded after 30 min, 6 h and 12 h, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592610&req=5

insects-05-00793-f001: Experimental set-up of larval feeding choice assay. Pea and cabbage leaf discs were offered in an alternate order and a fourth-instar larva was placed in the middle of the Petri dish. The positions of larva were recorded after 5 min, 30 min, 6 h and 12 h, and percentage of consumed leaf area was recorded after 30 min, 6 h and 12 h, respectively.

Mentions: The set-up of the larval feeding choice experiment is depicted in Figure 1. We used pea and cabbage leaf discs (1 cm diam) that were punched from the leaves of plants grown under the above-described conditions. The discs were placed in a Petri dish (12 cm diam). Larvae crawling on the bottom of the Petri dish could easily reach a disc and begin feeding. A filter paper moisturized with 1 mL of H2O was placed on the bottom of the Petri dish to prevent desiccation of the plant material. Three leaf discs from the two host plants tested, pea and cabbage, were arranged in alternating order (i.e., in total six leaf discs for each arena). This kind of arrangement increased the probability that a larva leaving a disc would encounter the other plant before coming again to the first plant.


Preference of Diamondback Moth Larvae for Novel and Original Host Plant after Host Range Expansion.

Henniges-Janssen K, Heckel DG, Groot AT - Insects (2014)

Experimental set-up of larval feeding choice assay. Pea and cabbage leaf discs were offered in an alternate order and a fourth-instar larva was placed in the middle of the Petri dish. The positions of larva were recorded after 5 min, 30 min, 6 h and 12 h, and percentage of consumed leaf area was recorded after 30 min, 6 h and 12 h, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592610&req=5

insects-05-00793-f001: Experimental set-up of larval feeding choice assay. Pea and cabbage leaf discs were offered in an alternate order and a fourth-instar larva was placed in the middle of the Petri dish. The positions of larva were recorded after 5 min, 30 min, 6 h and 12 h, and percentage of consumed leaf area was recorded after 30 min, 6 h and 12 h, respectively.
Mentions: The set-up of the larval feeding choice experiment is depicted in Figure 1. We used pea and cabbage leaf discs (1 cm diam) that were punched from the leaves of plants grown under the above-described conditions. The discs were placed in a Petri dish (12 cm diam). Larvae crawling on the bottom of the Petri dish could easily reach a disc and begin feeding. A filter paper moisturized with 1 mL of H2O was placed on the bottom of the Petri dish to prevent desiccation of the plant material. Three leaf discs from the two host plants tested, pea and cabbage, were arranged in alternating order (i.e., in total six leaf discs for each arena). This kind of arrangement increased the probability that a larva leaving a disc would encounter the other plant before coming again to the first plant.

Bottom Line: Here we examine larval preference for the novel host plant.However, pea-adapted larvae, which were reared on cabbage, also preferred cabbage.Thus both genetic differences and previous exposure affect larval host choice, while adult choice for the novel host has not yet evolved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knöll-Str. 8, Jena 07745, Germany. kjanssen@ice.mpg.de.

ABSTRACT
Utilization of a novel plant host by herbivorous insects requires coordination of numerous physiological and behavioral adaptations in both larvae and adults. The recent host range expansion of the crucifer-specialist diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), to the sugar pea crop in Kenya provides an opportunity to study this process in action. Previous studies have shown that larval ability to grow and complete development on sugar pea is genetically based, but that females of the pea-adapted strain do not prefer to oviposit on pea. Here we examine larval preference for the novel host plant. Larvae of the newly evolved pea-adapted host strain were offered the choice of the novel host plant sugar pea and the original host cabbage. These larvae significantly preferred pea, while in contrast, all larvae of a cabbage-adapted DBM strain preferred cabbage. However, pea-adapted larvae, which were reared on cabbage, also preferred cabbage. Thus both genetic differences and previous exposure affect larval host choice, while adult choice for the novel host has not yet evolved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus