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Female Moth Calling and Flight Behavior Are Altered Hours Following Pheromone Autodetection: Possible Implications for Practical Management with Mating Disruption.

Stelinski L, Holdcraft R, Rodriguez-Saona C - Insects (2014)

Bottom Line: A proposed hypothesis for the possible evolutionary benefits of autodetection is its possible role as a spacing mechanism to reduce female-female competition.Also, the propensity of female moths to initiate flight and the duration of flights, as quantified by a laboratory flight mill, were advanced in pre-exposed females as compared with controls.Pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated moths when they were confined with males in small enclosures over 24 hours in laboratory assays.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Citrus Research and Education Center, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, 700 Experiment Station Rd., Lake Alfred, FL 33850, USA. stelinski@ufl.edu.

ABSTRACT
Female moths are known to detect their own sex pheromone-a phenomenon called "autodetection". Autodetection has various effects on female moth behavior, including altering natural circadian rhythm of calling behavior, inducing flight, and in some cases causing aggregations of conspecifics. A proposed hypothesis for the possible evolutionary benefits of autodetection is its possible role as a spacing mechanism to reduce female-female competition. Here, we explore autodetection in two species of tortricids (Grapholita molesta (Busck) and Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris)). We find that females of both species not only "autodetect," but that learning (change in behavior following experience) occurs, which affects behavior for at least 24 hours after pheromone pre-exposure. Specifically, female calling in both species is advanced at least 24 hours, but not 5 days, following pheromone pre-exposure. Also, the propensity of female moths to initiate flight and the duration of flights, as quantified by a laboratory flight mill, were advanced in pre-exposed females as compared with controls. Pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated moths when they were confined with males in small enclosures over 24 hours in laboratory assays. We discuss the possible implications of these results with respect to management of these known pest species with the use of pheromone-based mating disruption.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mating status of female Grapholita molesta (A) or Choristoneura rosaceana (B) following a 24 hours interval in confined 1-L cages with a conspecific male under no pheromone exposure, and 24 hours or 5 days following pheromone exposure.
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insects-05-00459-f002: Mating status of female Grapholita molesta (A) or Choristoneura rosaceana (B) following a 24 hours interval in confined 1-L cages with a conspecific male under no pheromone exposure, and 24 hours or 5 days following pheromone exposure.

Mentions: At pheromone dosages that affected both calling and flight behavior of G. molesta and C. rosaceana, pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated G. molesta (Figure 2A) or C. rosaceana (Figure 2B) at either 24 hours or 5 days following pre-exposure as compared with the unexposed control treatment when pre-exposed or control females were confined with males (p > 0.05).


Female Moth Calling and Flight Behavior Are Altered Hours Following Pheromone Autodetection: Possible Implications for Practical Management with Mating Disruption.

Stelinski L, Holdcraft R, Rodriguez-Saona C - Insects (2014)

Mating status of female Grapholita molesta (A) or Choristoneura rosaceana (B) following a 24 hours interval in confined 1-L cages with a conspecific male under no pheromone exposure, and 24 hours or 5 days following pheromone exposure.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592591&req=5

insects-05-00459-f002: Mating status of female Grapholita molesta (A) or Choristoneura rosaceana (B) following a 24 hours interval in confined 1-L cages with a conspecific male under no pheromone exposure, and 24 hours or 5 days following pheromone exposure.
Mentions: At pheromone dosages that affected both calling and flight behavior of G. molesta and C. rosaceana, pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated G. molesta (Figure 2A) or C. rosaceana (Figure 2B) at either 24 hours or 5 days following pre-exposure as compared with the unexposed control treatment when pre-exposed or control females were confined with males (p > 0.05).

Bottom Line: A proposed hypothesis for the possible evolutionary benefits of autodetection is its possible role as a spacing mechanism to reduce female-female competition.Also, the propensity of female moths to initiate flight and the duration of flights, as quantified by a laboratory flight mill, were advanced in pre-exposed females as compared with controls.Pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated moths when they were confined with males in small enclosures over 24 hours in laboratory assays.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Citrus Research and Education Center, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, 700 Experiment Station Rd., Lake Alfred, FL 33850, USA. stelinski@ufl.edu.

ABSTRACT
Female moths are known to detect their own sex pheromone-a phenomenon called "autodetection". Autodetection has various effects on female moth behavior, including altering natural circadian rhythm of calling behavior, inducing flight, and in some cases causing aggregations of conspecifics. A proposed hypothesis for the possible evolutionary benefits of autodetection is its possible role as a spacing mechanism to reduce female-female competition. Here, we explore autodetection in two species of tortricids (Grapholita molesta (Busck) and Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris)). We find that females of both species not only "autodetect," but that learning (change in behavior following experience) occurs, which affects behavior for at least 24 hours after pheromone pre-exposure. Specifically, female calling in both species is advanced at least 24 hours, but not 5 days, following pheromone pre-exposure. Also, the propensity of female moths to initiate flight and the duration of flights, as quantified by a laboratory flight mill, were advanced in pre-exposed females as compared with controls. Pheromone pre-exposure did not affect the proportion of mated moths when they were confined with males in small enclosures over 24 hours in laboratory assays. We discuss the possible implications of these results with respect to management of these known pest species with the use of pheromone-based mating disruption.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus