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Observation of the Mating Behavior of Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.) Queens Using Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID): Factors Influencing the Duration and Frequency of Nuptial Flights.

Heidinger IM, Meixner MD, Berg S, Büchler R - Insects (2014)

Bottom Line: We found significant differences between the two locations concerning the number of flights on the first three days.We also observed an effect of the ambient temperature, with queens flying less often but longer at high temperatures compared to lower temperatures.Increasing the number of drone colonies from 33 to 80 colonies had no effect on the duration or on the frequency of nuptial flights.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: LLH, Bee Institute, Erlenstrasse 9, D-35274 Kirchhain, Germany. ina.heidinger@gmx.de.

ABSTRACT
We used radio-frequency identification (RFID) to record the duration and frequency of nuptial flights of honey bee queens (Apis mellifera carnica) at two mainland mating apiaries. We investigated the effect of a number of factors on flight duration and frequency: mating apiary, number of drone colonies, queen's age and temperature. We found significant differences between the two locations concerning the number of flights on the first three days. We also observed an effect of the ambient temperature, with queens flying less often but longer at high temperatures compared to lower temperatures. Increasing the number of drone colonies from 33 to 80 colonies had no effect on the duration or on the frequency of nuptial flights. Since our results agree well with the results of previous studies, we suggest RFID as an appropriate tool to investigate the mating behavior of honey bee queens.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Duration of the nuptial flights depending on the age of the queen. Arithmetic mean and standard error are given for each age class. N is the number of flights in the dataset. (b) Comparison of the duration of the first, second and third nuptial flights on a given day and all other flights of the same day. Arithmetic mean and standard error are given for each class. N is the number of flights in the dataset. (c) The nuptial flight duration in relation to the temperature when queens left their nuc.
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insects-05-00513-f006: (a) Duration of the nuptial flights depending on the age of the queen. Arithmetic mean and standard error are given for each age class. N is the number of flights in the dataset. (b) Comparison of the duration of the first, second and third nuptial flights on a given day and all other flights of the same day. Arithmetic mean and standard error are given for each class. N is the number of flights in the dataset. (c) The nuptial flight duration in relation to the temperature when queens left their nuc.

Mentions: In contrast to the number of nuptial flights of all queens, their mean duration did not differ significantly between the two mating apiaries (Table 5). The mean daily nuptial flight duration of each queen did not differ between flights taken on different days (Kruskal-Wallis-test; Chi2 = 2.58, p = 0.631). We also found no effect of the number of drone colonies on the duration of the nuptial flights (Table 5). However, flight duration significantly depends on the age of the queen (Table 5, Figure 6a), with the youngest (<9 days) and oldest (>15 days) queens flying significantly longer than queens of medium age (10 to 14 days). Flight duration also depends on the rank of the flight (Table 5, Figure 6b), where the first flights were the longest ones. In addition, the duration of the nuptial flights significantly increased with increasing temperature (at departure; Table 5, Figure 6c).


Observation of the Mating Behavior of Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.) Queens Using Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID): Factors Influencing the Duration and Frequency of Nuptial Flights.

Heidinger IM, Meixner MD, Berg S, Büchler R - Insects (2014)

(a) Duration of the nuptial flights depending on the age of the queen. Arithmetic mean and standard error are given for each age class. N is the number of flights in the dataset. (b) Comparison of the duration of the first, second and third nuptial flights on a given day and all other flights of the same day. Arithmetic mean and standard error are given for each class. N is the number of flights in the dataset. (c) The nuptial flight duration in relation to the temperature when queens left their nuc.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592583&req=5

insects-05-00513-f006: (a) Duration of the nuptial flights depending on the age of the queen. Arithmetic mean and standard error are given for each age class. N is the number of flights in the dataset. (b) Comparison of the duration of the first, second and third nuptial flights on a given day and all other flights of the same day. Arithmetic mean and standard error are given for each class. N is the number of flights in the dataset. (c) The nuptial flight duration in relation to the temperature when queens left their nuc.
Mentions: In contrast to the number of nuptial flights of all queens, their mean duration did not differ significantly between the two mating apiaries (Table 5). The mean daily nuptial flight duration of each queen did not differ between flights taken on different days (Kruskal-Wallis-test; Chi2 = 2.58, p = 0.631). We also found no effect of the number of drone colonies on the duration of the nuptial flights (Table 5). However, flight duration significantly depends on the age of the queen (Table 5, Figure 6a), with the youngest (<9 days) and oldest (>15 days) queens flying significantly longer than queens of medium age (10 to 14 days). Flight duration also depends on the rank of the flight (Table 5, Figure 6b), where the first flights were the longest ones. In addition, the duration of the nuptial flights significantly increased with increasing temperature (at departure; Table 5, Figure 6c).

Bottom Line: We found significant differences between the two locations concerning the number of flights on the first three days.We also observed an effect of the ambient temperature, with queens flying less often but longer at high temperatures compared to lower temperatures.Increasing the number of drone colonies from 33 to 80 colonies had no effect on the duration or on the frequency of nuptial flights.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: LLH, Bee Institute, Erlenstrasse 9, D-35274 Kirchhain, Germany. ina.heidinger@gmx.de.

ABSTRACT
We used radio-frequency identification (RFID) to record the duration and frequency of nuptial flights of honey bee queens (Apis mellifera carnica) at two mainland mating apiaries. We investigated the effect of a number of factors on flight duration and frequency: mating apiary, number of drone colonies, queen's age and temperature. We found significant differences between the two locations concerning the number of flights on the first three days. We also observed an effect of the ambient temperature, with queens flying less often but longer at high temperatures compared to lower temperatures. Increasing the number of drone colonies from 33 to 80 colonies had no effect on the duration or on the frequency of nuptial flights. Since our results agree well with the results of previous studies, we suggest RFID as an appropriate tool to investigate the mating behavior of honey bee queens.

No MeSH data available.