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A New Visual Trap for Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

Daniel C, Mathis S, Feichtinger G - Insects (2014)

Bottom Line: The European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most important pest of sweet cherries in Europe.Yellow traps with increased reflectance in the blue region (400-500 nm) were least attractive.Trap shape was of minor importance, as long as the object was three-dimensional and visible from all directions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 113, Postfach 219, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. claudia.daniel@fibl.org.

ABSTRACT
The European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most important pest of sweet cherries in Europe. The aim of our experiments was to develop a new, cost-efficient, lead chromate-free and more eco-friendly trap for monitoring and mass trapping of R. cerasi. Five different-colored yellow panels and three different trap shapes were compared to a standard Rebell(®) amarillo trap in three experimental orchards in 2012. Trap color F, with a strong increase in reflectance at 500-550 nm and a secondary peak in the UV-region at 300-400 nm, captured significantly more flies than the standard Rebell(®) amarillo trap. Yellow traps with increased reflectance in the blue region (400-500 nm) were least attractive. Trap shape was of minor importance, as long as the object was three-dimensional and visible from all directions. Based on economic and practical considerations, a cylinder-shaped trap "UFA-Samen Kirschenfliegenfalle" was developed for commercial use and is currently under on-farm evaluation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The color of trap types before and after the experiment (trap Type L = Rebell® amarillo).
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insects-05-00564-f005: The color of trap types before and after the experiment (trap Type L = Rebell® amarillo).

Mentions: Captures of cherry fruit flies during the fifth week of the experiment (Figure 4, grey bars) were lower than during the second week of the experiment (Figure 4, white bars). This observation can be due to several reasons: (1) reduced fly abundance due to natural mortality; (2) reduced flight activity of the cherry fruit fly; (3) reduced attractiveness of the traps, due to fading of the yellow color; or (4) reduced attractiveness of the traps due to black pollution with already captured insects. The reduction of captures was most pronounced in trap Type K, which visually faded during the experimental period (Figure 5). Trap Type H also faded, but the reduction in captures was less pronounced. Both trap Types H and K were nearly white at the end of the experiment. Fading was less obvious in the other trap types. Trap Type I was a bit lighter at the end of the experiment and also showed a reduction in captures in the fifth week of the experiment. Trap Types F and G were very stable, because the yellow color was not printed onto the trap, but imbued within it. Reduced captures in trap Types F and G might also be due to pollution with already captured insects. Absolutely no visual fading was observed in the Rebell® amarillo trap. This observation is in accordance with other experiments [27,28]. The Rebell® amarillo trap contains highly-stable lead chromate yellow pigments and is intended to be reusable for several years after cleaning and new gluing. The Rebell® amarillo trap showed the lowest reduction in captures. However, fading might have been of minor importance, because the rank order of captures of the different trap types was the same during the second and the fifth week of the experiment. Thus, we assume that the performance of the traps was stable over one flight period of R. cerasi. However, given the observed fading, the new trap types are not reusable in consecutive years.


A New Visual Trap for Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

Daniel C, Mathis S, Feichtinger G - Insects (2014)

The color of trap types before and after the experiment (trap Type L = Rebell® amarillo).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592580&req=5

insects-05-00564-f005: The color of trap types before and after the experiment (trap Type L = Rebell® amarillo).
Mentions: Captures of cherry fruit flies during the fifth week of the experiment (Figure 4, grey bars) were lower than during the second week of the experiment (Figure 4, white bars). This observation can be due to several reasons: (1) reduced fly abundance due to natural mortality; (2) reduced flight activity of the cherry fruit fly; (3) reduced attractiveness of the traps, due to fading of the yellow color; or (4) reduced attractiveness of the traps due to black pollution with already captured insects. The reduction of captures was most pronounced in trap Type K, which visually faded during the experimental period (Figure 5). Trap Type H also faded, but the reduction in captures was less pronounced. Both trap Types H and K were nearly white at the end of the experiment. Fading was less obvious in the other trap types. Trap Type I was a bit lighter at the end of the experiment and also showed a reduction in captures in the fifth week of the experiment. Trap Types F and G were very stable, because the yellow color was not printed onto the trap, but imbued within it. Reduced captures in trap Types F and G might also be due to pollution with already captured insects. Absolutely no visual fading was observed in the Rebell® amarillo trap. This observation is in accordance with other experiments [27,28]. The Rebell® amarillo trap contains highly-stable lead chromate yellow pigments and is intended to be reusable for several years after cleaning and new gluing. The Rebell® amarillo trap showed the lowest reduction in captures. However, fading might have been of minor importance, because the rank order of captures of the different trap types was the same during the second and the fifth week of the experiment. Thus, we assume that the performance of the traps was stable over one flight period of R. cerasi. However, given the observed fading, the new trap types are not reusable in consecutive years.

Bottom Line: The European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most important pest of sweet cherries in Europe.Yellow traps with increased reflectance in the blue region (400-500 nm) were least attractive.Trap shape was of minor importance, as long as the object was three-dimensional and visible from all directions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 113, Postfach 219, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland. claudia.daniel@fibl.org.

ABSTRACT
The European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most important pest of sweet cherries in Europe. The aim of our experiments was to develop a new, cost-efficient, lead chromate-free and more eco-friendly trap for monitoring and mass trapping of R. cerasi. Five different-colored yellow panels and three different trap shapes were compared to a standard Rebell(®) amarillo trap in three experimental orchards in 2012. Trap color F, with a strong increase in reflectance at 500-550 nm and a secondary peak in the UV-region at 300-400 nm, captured significantly more flies than the standard Rebell(®) amarillo trap. Yellow traps with increased reflectance in the blue region (400-500 nm) were least attractive. Trap shape was of minor importance, as long as the object was three-dimensional and visible from all directions. Based on economic and practical considerations, a cylinder-shaped trap "UFA-Samen Kirschenfliegenfalle" was developed for commercial use and is currently under on-farm evaluation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus