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Impact of UV-H2O2 Advanced Oxidation and Aging Processes on GAC Capacity for the Removal of Cyanobacterial Taste and Odor Compounds.

Zamyadi A, Sawade E, Ho L, Newcombe G, Hofmann R - Environ Health Insights (2015)

Bottom Line: Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) are the most commonly detected T&O compounds associated with cyanobacterial presence in drinking water sources.However, residual H2O2 (>80% of the initial dose) has to be removed from water prior final disinfection.Recently, granular activated carbon (GAC) is used to remove H2O2 residual.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ; Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Cyanobacteria and their taste and odor (T&O) compounds are a growing concern in water sources globally. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) are the most commonly detected T&O compounds associated with cyanobacterial presence in drinking water sources. The use of ultraviolet and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an advanced oxidation treatment for T&O control is an emerging technology. However, residual H2O2 (>80% of the initial dose) has to be removed from water prior final disinfection. Recently, granular activated carbon (GAC) is used to remove H2O2 residual. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of H2O2 quenching and aging processes on GAC capacity for the removal of geosmin and MIB. Pilot columns with different types of GAC and presence/absence of H2O2 have been used for this study. H2O2 removal for the operational period of 6 months has no significant impact on GAC capacity to remove the geosmin and MIB from water.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of a UF and advanced oxidation plant in Ontario, Canada, and fate of algal cells and their by-products during the treatment: red square highlights the UV–H2O2 process that causes the residual H2O2 in the water post-AOPNotes: *T&O, T&O compounds; **UV, ultraviolet advanced oxidation; and ***GAC, granular activated carbon.
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f2-ehi-suppl.3-2015-001: Schematic representation of a UF and advanced oxidation plant in Ontario, Canada, and fate of algal cells and their by-products during the treatment: red square highlights the UV–H2O2 process that causes the residual H2O2 in the water post-AOPNotes: *T&O, T&O compounds; **UV, ultraviolet advanced oxidation; and ***GAC, granular activated carbon.

Mentions: Multibarrier treatment system in a water treatment plant (WTP) in southern Ontario, Canada, includes the use of UV–H2O2 as an advanced oxidation treatment for T&O control (Fig. 2). The studied Canadian WTP is using GAC contactor to quench the residual H2O2 (Fig. 2). This pilot study was conducted to verify the performance of virgin and aged GAC (from quenching H2O2) at different depths for the removal of geosmin and MIB. Figure 3 demonstrates the schematic representation and the complete installation of the pilot setup that was installed in the studied Canadian WTP. The conditions of the columns are presented in Table 1.


Impact of UV-H2O2 Advanced Oxidation and Aging Processes on GAC Capacity for the Removal of Cyanobacterial Taste and Odor Compounds.

Zamyadi A, Sawade E, Ho L, Newcombe G, Hofmann R - Environ Health Insights (2015)

Schematic representation of a UF and advanced oxidation plant in Ontario, Canada, and fate of algal cells and their by-products during the treatment: red square highlights the UV–H2O2 process that causes the residual H2O2 in the water post-AOPNotes: *T&O, T&O compounds; **UV, ultraviolet advanced oxidation; and ***GAC, granular activated carbon.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592064&req=5

f2-ehi-suppl.3-2015-001: Schematic representation of a UF and advanced oxidation plant in Ontario, Canada, and fate of algal cells and their by-products during the treatment: red square highlights the UV–H2O2 process that causes the residual H2O2 in the water post-AOPNotes: *T&O, T&O compounds; **UV, ultraviolet advanced oxidation; and ***GAC, granular activated carbon.
Mentions: Multibarrier treatment system in a water treatment plant (WTP) in southern Ontario, Canada, includes the use of UV–H2O2 as an advanced oxidation treatment for T&O control (Fig. 2). The studied Canadian WTP is using GAC contactor to quench the residual H2O2 (Fig. 2). This pilot study was conducted to verify the performance of virgin and aged GAC (from quenching H2O2) at different depths for the removal of geosmin and MIB. Figure 3 demonstrates the schematic representation and the complete installation of the pilot setup that was installed in the studied Canadian WTP. The conditions of the columns are presented in Table 1.

Bottom Line: Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) are the most commonly detected T&O compounds associated with cyanobacterial presence in drinking water sources.However, residual H2O2 (>80% of the initial dose) has to be removed from water prior final disinfection.Recently, granular activated carbon (GAC) is used to remove H2O2 residual.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ; Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Cyanobacteria and their taste and odor (T&O) compounds are a growing concern in water sources globally. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) are the most commonly detected T&O compounds associated with cyanobacterial presence in drinking water sources. The use of ultraviolet and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an advanced oxidation treatment for T&O control is an emerging technology. However, residual H2O2 (>80% of the initial dose) has to be removed from water prior final disinfection. Recently, granular activated carbon (GAC) is used to remove H2O2 residual. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of H2O2 quenching and aging processes on GAC capacity for the removal of geosmin and MIB. Pilot columns with different types of GAC and presence/absence of H2O2 have been used for this study. H2O2 removal for the operational period of 6 months has no significant impact on GAC capacity to remove the geosmin and MIB from water.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus