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Microparticles as Biomarkers of Blood Coagulation in Cancer.

Nomura S, Niki M, Nisizawa T, Tamaki T, Shimizu M - Biomark Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Tumor-derived tissue factor (TF)-bearing microparticles (MPs) are associated with VTE events in malignancy.MPs are small membrane vesicles released from many different cell types by exocytic budding of the plasma membrane in response to cellular activation or apoptosis.In lung and breast cancer patients, MPs induce metastasis and angiogenesis and may be indicators of vascular complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Cancer is associated with hypercoagulopathy and increased risk of thrombosis. This negatively influences patient morbidity and mortality. Cancer is also frequently complicated by the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Tumor-derived tissue factor (TF)-bearing microparticles (MPs) are associated with VTE events in malignancy. MPs are small membrane vesicles released from many different cell types by exocytic budding of the plasma membrane in response to cellular activation or apoptosis. MPs may also be involved in clinical diseases through expression of procoagulative phospholipids. The detection of TF-expressing MPs in cancer patients may be clinically useful. In lung and breast cancer patients, MPs induce metastasis and angiogenesis and may be indicators of vascular complications. Additionally, MPs in patients with various types of cancer possess adhesion proteins and bind target cells to promoting cancer progression or metastasis. Overexpression of TF by cancer cells is closely associated with tumor progression, and shedding of TF-expressing MPs by cancer cells correlates with the genetic status of cancer. Consequently, TF-expressing MPs represent important markers to consider in the prevention of and therapy for VTE complications in cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Role of TF-MPs in activation of target cells and organs. TF-MPs can carry some substances, such as integrin, cell adhesion molecule, chemokines, phospholipids, and TF. TF mainly contributes to activation of the extrinsic coagulation system.Abbreviations: TF, tissue factor; PS, phosphatidylserine; mRNA, messenger RNA; CAM, cell adhesion molecule.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f2-bic-7-2015-051: Role of TF-MPs in activation of target cells and organs. TF-MPs can carry some substances, such as integrin, cell adhesion molecule, chemokines, phospholipids, and TF. TF mainly contributes to activation of the extrinsic coagulation system.Abbreviations: TF, tissue factor; PS, phosphatidylserine; mRNA, messenger RNA; CAM, cell adhesion molecule.

Mentions: We have summarized the literature to date regarding TF-MPs, highlighting the growing list of cancer types that are associated with elevated MP levels. MPs were initially identified as small particles originating from multiple cell types and possessing PCA. MPs of multiple origins—including cancer cells—may contribute to the increased levels of TF-MPs found in cancer patients, ultimately resulting in cancer-associated coagulopathy (Fig. 2). The PCA of TF-MPs is mediated by expression of TF and the exposure of PS on the MP surface. Adhesion proteins, including CD24 and CD43, have been proposed to be involved in the binding of TF-MPs to target cells.88,89 The utilization of circulating MPs as cancer biomarkers may provide effective and noninvasive methods of cancer diagnosis, prognosis assessment, and disease surveillance to tailor and personalize therapies. However, the functional role played by TF-MPs in cancer patients needs to be understood in greater detail.


Microparticles as Biomarkers of Blood Coagulation in Cancer.

Nomura S, Niki M, Nisizawa T, Tamaki T, Shimizu M - Biomark Cancer (2015)

Role of TF-MPs in activation of target cells and organs. TF-MPs can carry some substances, such as integrin, cell adhesion molecule, chemokines, phospholipids, and TF. TF mainly contributes to activation of the extrinsic coagulation system.Abbreviations: TF, tissue factor; PS, phosphatidylserine; mRNA, messenger RNA; CAM, cell adhesion molecule.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592056&req=5

f2-bic-7-2015-051: Role of TF-MPs in activation of target cells and organs. TF-MPs can carry some substances, such as integrin, cell adhesion molecule, chemokines, phospholipids, and TF. TF mainly contributes to activation of the extrinsic coagulation system.Abbreviations: TF, tissue factor; PS, phosphatidylserine; mRNA, messenger RNA; CAM, cell adhesion molecule.
Mentions: We have summarized the literature to date regarding TF-MPs, highlighting the growing list of cancer types that are associated with elevated MP levels. MPs were initially identified as small particles originating from multiple cell types and possessing PCA. MPs of multiple origins—including cancer cells—may contribute to the increased levels of TF-MPs found in cancer patients, ultimately resulting in cancer-associated coagulopathy (Fig. 2). The PCA of TF-MPs is mediated by expression of TF and the exposure of PS on the MP surface. Adhesion proteins, including CD24 and CD43, have been proposed to be involved in the binding of TF-MPs to target cells.88,89 The utilization of circulating MPs as cancer biomarkers may provide effective and noninvasive methods of cancer diagnosis, prognosis assessment, and disease surveillance to tailor and personalize therapies. However, the functional role played by TF-MPs in cancer patients needs to be understood in greater detail.

Bottom Line: Tumor-derived tissue factor (TF)-bearing microparticles (MPs) are associated with VTE events in malignancy.MPs are small membrane vesicles released from many different cell types by exocytic budding of the plasma membrane in response to cellular activation or apoptosis.In lung and breast cancer patients, MPs induce metastasis and angiogenesis and may be indicators of vascular complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Cancer is associated with hypercoagulopathy and increased risk of thrombosis. This negatively influences patient morbidity and mortality. Cancer is also frequently complicated by the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Tumor-derived tissue factor (TF)-bearing microparticles (MPs) are associated with VTE events in malignancy. MPs are small membrane vesicles released from many different cell types by exocytic budding of the plasma membrane in response to cellular activation or apoptosis. MPs may also be involved in clinical diseases through expression of procoagulative phospholipids. The detection of TF-expressing MPs in cancer patients may be clinically useful. In lung and breast cancer patients, MPs induce metastasis and angiogenesis and may be indicators of vascular complications. Additionally, MPs in patients with various types of cancer possess adhesion proteins and bind target cells to promoting cancer progression or metastasis. Overexpression of TF by cancer cells is closely associated with tumor progression, and shedding of TF-expressing MPs by cancer cells correlates with the genetic status of cancer. Consequently, TF-expressing MPs represent important markers to consider in the prevention of and therapy for VTE complications in cancer patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus