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What the Young Physician Should Know About May-Thurner Syndrome.

Donatella N, Marcello BU, Gaetano V, Massimo P, Massimo M, Giancarlo B - Transl Med UniSa (2014)

Bottom Line: Mainly, clinical symptoms and signs include, but are not limited to, pain, swelling, venous stasis ulcers, skin pigmentation changes and post-thrombotic syndrome.Correct treatment is not well established and is based on clinical presentation.The aim of this review is to present in a simple and didactic form all variable clinical presentations of MTS and to outline possible management within the current guidelines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology D.I.B.I.M.E.F., "P. Giaccone" University Hospital, Palermo, Italy.

ABSTRACT
May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is an anatomically variable condition resulting in compression of the left common iliac vein between the right common iliac artery and the underlying spine with subsequent development of a left deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Although this syndrome is rare, its true prevalence is likely underestimated. Mainly, clinical symptoms and signs include, but are not limited to, pain, swelling, venous stasis ulcers, skin pigmentation changes and post-thrombotic syndrome. Correct treatment is not well established and is based on clinical presentation. Staged thrombolysis with/without prophylactic retrievable inferior vena cava filter placement followed by angioplasty/stenting of the left iliac vein appears to be the best option in MTS patients with extensive DVT. The aim of this review is to present in a simple and didactic form all variable clinical presentations of MTS and to outline possible management within the current guidelines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

drawing showing Palma operation with autologous saphenous vein graft
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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f5-tm-12-19: drawing showing Palma operation with autologous saphenous vein graft

Mentions: Surgical management can be offered with different surgical treatment methods. (Fig. 5).


What the Young Physician Should Know About May-Thurner Syndrome.

Donatella N, Marcello BU, Gaetano V, Massimo P, Massimo M, Giancarlo B - Transl Med UniSa (2014)

drawing showing Palma operation with autologous saphenous vein graft
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4592040&req=5

f5-tm-12-19: drawing showing Palma operation with autologous saphenous vein graft
Mentions: Surgical management can be offered with different surgical treatment methods. (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: Mainly, clinical symptoms and signs include, but are not limited to, pain, swelling, venous stasis ulcers, skin pigmentation changes and post-thrombotic syndrome.Correct treatment is not well established and is based on clinical presentation.The aim of this review is to present in a simple and didactic form all variable clinical presentations of MTS and to outline possible management within the current guidelines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology D.I.B.I.M.E.F., "P. Giaccone" University Hospital, Palermo, Italy.

ABSTRACT
May-Thurner syndrome (MTS) is an anatomically variable condition resulting in compression of the left common iliac vein between the right common iliac artery and the underlying spine with subsequent development of a left deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Although this syndrome is rare, its true prevalence is likely underestimated. Mainly, clinical symptoms and signs include, but are not limited to, pain, swelling, venous stasis ulcers, skin pigmentation changes and post-thrombotic syndrome. Correct treatment is not well established and is based on clinical presentation. Staged thrombolysis with/without prophylactic retrievable inferior vena cava filter placement followed by angioplasty/stenting of the left iliac vein appears to be the best option in MTS patients with extensive DVT. The aim of this review is to present in a simple and didactic form all variable clinical presentations of MTS and to outline possible management within the current guidelines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus