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Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification.

Shah KG, Guelig D, Diesburg S, Buser J, Burton R, LaBarre P, Richards-Kortum R, Weigl B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device.Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment.This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America; PATH, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters.

No MeSH data available.


Ramp-up and holdover times.(a) Ramp-up times ( ± s) are reduced (*p = 0.018) and holdover times ( ± s) show no change with the addition of sodium chloride to the magnesium-iron fuel pack. (n = 3) (b) In contrast, the addition of copper (II) chloride does not significantly affect ramp-up, but significantly reduces holdover (**p = 0.005). (n = 3) † indicates identical data points.
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pone.0139449.g003: Ramp-up and holdover times.(a) Ramp-up times ( ± s) are reduced (*p = 0.018) and holdover times ( ± s) show no change with the addition of sodium chloride to the magnesium-iron fuel pack. (n = 3) (b) In contrast, the addition of copper (II) chloride does not significantly affect ramp-up, but significantly reduces holdover (**p = 0.005). (n = 3) † indicates identical data points.

Mentions: Fig 2 shows characteristic temperature-time profiles for the chemical heaters at varying levels of sodium chloride. As expected and shown in Fig 3a, there is a statistically-significant decrease in ramp-up time from 25.0 ± 5.6 minutes to 8.9 ± 1.5 minutes when comparing the negative sodium chloride control to all tested sodium chloride concentrations (p = 0.018). No statistically significant difference in holdover time was observed with the addition of sodium chloride (p = 0.32), and was 12.7 ± 3.4 minutes. Temperatures exceeding the 62°C upper threshold by up to 0.1°C were observed when 75 or 100 mg of sodium chloride was added.


Design of a New Type of Compact Chemical Heater for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification.

Shah KG, Guelig D, Diesburg S, Buser J, Burton R, LaBarre P, Richards-Kortum R, Weigl B - PLoS ONE (2015)

Ramp-up and holdover times.(a) Ramp-up times ( ± s) are reduced (*p = 0.018) and holdover times ( ± s) show no change with the addition of sodium chloride to the magnesium-iron fuel pack. (n = 3) (b) In contrast, the addition of copper (II) chloride does not significantly affect ramp-up, but significantly reduces holdover (**p = 0.005). (n = 3) † indicates identical data points.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591995&req=5

pone.0139449.g003: Ramp-up and holdover times.(a) Ramp-up times ( ± s) are reduced (*p = 0.018) and holdover times ( ± s) show no change with the addition of sodium chloride to the magnesium-iron fuel pack. (n = 3) (b) In contrast, the addition of copper (II) chloride does not significantly affect ramp-up, but significantly reduces holdover (**p = 0.005). (n = 3) † indicates identical data points.
Mentions: Fig 2 shows characteristic temperature-time profiles for the chemical heaters at varying levels of sodium chloride. As expected and shown in Fig 3a, there is a statistically-significant decrease in ramp-up time from 25.0 ± 5.6 minutes to 8.9 ± 1.5 minutes when comparing the negative sodium chloride control to all tested sodium chloride concentrations (p = 0.018). No statistically significant difference in holdover time was observed with the addition of sodium chloride (p = 0.32), and was 12.7 ± 3.4 minutes. Temperatures exceeding the 62°C upper threshold by up to 0.1°C were observed when 75 or 100 mg of sodium chloride was added.

Bottom Line: Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device.Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment.This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas, United States of America; PATH, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Previous chemical heater designs for isothermal nucleic acid amplification have been based on solid-liquid phase transition, but using this approach, developers have identified design challenges en route to developing a low-cost, disposable device. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a new heater configuration suitable for isothermal amplification in which one reactant of an exothermic reaction is a liquid-gas phase-change material, thereby eliminating the need for a separate phase-change compartment. This design offers potentially enhanced performance and energy density compared to other chemical and electric heaters.

No MeSH data available.