Limits...
The Role of Self-Compassion in Buffering Symptoms of Depression in the General Population.

Körner A, Coroiu A, Copeland L, Gomez-Garibello C, Albani C, Zenger M, Brähler E - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The SCS subscales of self-judgment, isolation, and over-identification, and the "self-coldness", composite score, which encompass these three negative subscales, consistently differed between subsamples of individuals without any depressive symptoms, with any depressive syndromes, and with major depressive disorder.The contribution of the positive SCS subscales of self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness to the variance in depressive symptomatology was almost negligible.However, when combined to a "self-compassion composite", the positive SCS subscales significantly moderated the relationship between "self-coldness" and depressive symptoms in the general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Louise-Granofsky-Psychosocial Oncology Program, Segal Cancer Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada; Psychosocial Oncology Program, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Self-compassion, typically operationalized as the total score of the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS; Neff, 2003b), has been shown to be related to increased psychological well-being and lower depression in students of the social sciences, users of psychology websites and psychotherapy patients. The current study builds on the existing literature by examining the link between self-compassion and depressive symptomatology in a sample representative of the German general population (n = 2,404). The SCS subscales of self-judgment, isolation, and over-identification, and the "self-coldness", composite score, which encompass these three negative subscales, consistently differed between subsamples of individuals without any depressive symptoms, with any depressive syndromes, and with major depressive disorder. The contribution of the positive SCS subscales of self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness to the variance in depressive symptomatology was almost negligible. However, when combined to a "self-compassion composite", the positive SCS subscales significantly moderated the relationship between "self-coldness" and depressive symptoms in the general population. This speaks for self-compassion having the potential to buffer self-coldness related to depression--providing an argument for interventions that foster self-caring, kind, and forgiving attitudes towards oneself.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of the moderation of the relationship between self-coldness and depression by self-compassion (n = 2,404).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591980&req=5

pone.0136598.g001: Illustration of the moderation of the relationship between self-coldness and depression by self-compassion (n = 2,404).

Mentions: Moderation was tested via methodology developed by Preacher and Hayes [45]. The hypothesized model suggested a significant interaction effect of self-compassion and self-coldness on depression scores (p < .001). The fact that the lower and upper limits of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the interaction did not cross the zero mark, further corroborates the statistical significance of the moderation effect (see Table 4 for detailed results). As such, this model was considered significant, R2 = .23, MSE = .09, F(3, 2307) = 229.07, p < .001. The variance increase due to the interaction effect was R2 = .01. The moderation effect is plotted in Fig 1. As the relationship between self-coldness and depression severity was moderated by self-compassion at all levels (i.e., high, average, low) of the moderator, a slope analysis was conducted to better understand this moderation effect. Following guidelines developed by Hayes [46], a simple slope analysis assessed the relationship between self-coldness and depression at high (i.e., 1 SD above the mean) and low (i.e., 1 SD below the mean) levels of the moderator (i.e., positive SCS). The association between self-coldness and depression was significantly weaker (t(2312) = -.6.75, p < .001) among individuals with high self-compassion (β = 1.76, t = 9.24, p < .001) than among those with low self-compassion (β = 2.69, t = 16.53, p < .001).


The Role of Self-Compassion in Buffering Symptoms of Depression in the General Population.

Körner A, Coroiu A, Copeland L, Gomez-Garibello C, Albani C, Zenger M, Brähler E - PLoS ONE (2015)

Illustration of the moderation of the relationship between self-coldness and depression by self-compassion (n = 2,404).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591980&req=5

pone.0136598.g001: Illustration of the moderation of the relationship between self-coldness and depression by self-compassion (n = 2,404).
Mentions: Moderation was tested via methodology developed by Preacher and Hayes [45]. The hypothesized model suggested a significant interaction effect of self-compassion and self-coldness on depression scores (p < .001). The fact that the lower and upper limits of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the interaction did not cross the zero mark, further corroborates the statistical significance of the moderation effect (see Table 4 for detailed results). As such, this model was considered significant, R2 = .23, MSE = .09, F(3, 2307) = 229.07, p < .001. The variance increase due to the interaction effect was R2 = .01. The moderation effect is plotted in Fig 1. As the relationship between self-coldness and depression severity was moderated by self-compassion at all levels (i.e., high, average, low) of the moderator, a slope analysis was conducted to better understand this moderation effect. Following guidelines developed by Hayes [46], a simple slope analysis assessed the relationship between self-coldness and depression at high (i.e., 1 SD above the mean) and low (i.e., 1 SD below the mean) levels of the moderator (i.e., positive SCS). The association between self-coldness and depression was significantly weaker (t(2312) = -.6.75, p < .001) among individuals with high self-compassion (β = 1.76, t = 9.24, p < .001) than among those with low self-compassion (β = 2.69, t = 16.53, p < .001).

Bottom Line: The SCS subscales of self-judgment, isolation, and over-identification, and the "self-coldness", composite score, which encompass these three negative subscales, consistently differed between subsamples of individuals without any depressive symptoms, with any depressive syndromes, and with major depressive disorder.The contribution of the positive SCS subscales of self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness to the variance in depressive symptomatology was almost negligible.However, when combined to a "self-compassion composite", the positive SCS subscales significantly moderated the relationship between "self-coldness" and depressive symptoms in the general population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Louise-Granofsky-Psychosocial Oncology Program, Segal Cancer Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada; Psychosocial Oncology Program, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Self-compassion, typically operationalized as the total score of the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS; Neff, 2003b), has been shown to be related to increased psychological well-being and lower depression in students of the social sciences, users of psychology websites and psychotherapy patients. The current study builds on the existing literature by examining the link between self-compassion and depressive symptomatology in a sample representative of the German general population (n = 2,404). The SCS subscales of self-judgment, isolation, and over-identification, and the "self-coldness", composite score, which encompass these three negative subscales, consistently differed between subsamples of individuals without any depressive symptoms, with any depressive syndromes, and with major depressive disorder. The contribution of the positive SCS subscales of self-kindness, common humanity, and mindfulness to the variance in depressive symptomatology was almost negligible. However, when combined to a "self-compassion composite", the positive SCS subscales significantly moderated the relationship between "self-coldness" and depressive symptoms in the general population. This speaks for self-compassion having the potential to buffer self-coldness related to depression--providing an argument for interventions that foster self-caring, kind, and forgiving attitudes towards oneself.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus