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Collider Interplay for Supersymmetry, Higgs and Dark Matter.

Buchmueller O, Citron M, Ellis J, Guha S, Marrouche J, Olive KA, de Vries K, Zheng J - Eur Phys J C Part Fields (2015)

Bottom Line: If supersymmetry is not discovered at the LHC, it is likely to lie somewhere along a focus-point, stop-coannihilation strip or direct-channel A / H resonance funnel.We discuss the prospects for discovering supersymmetry along these strips at a future circular proton-proton collider such as FCC-hh.Illustrative benchmark points on these strips indicate that also in this case FCC-ee could provide tests of the CMSSM at the loop level.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Lab., Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ UK.

ABSTRACT

We discuss the potential impacts on the CMSSM of future LHC runs and possible [Formula: see text] and higher-energy proton-proton colliders, considering searches for supersymmetry via  [Formula: see text] events, precision electroweak physics, Higgs measurements and dark matter searches. We validate and present estimates of the physics reach for exclusion or discovery of supersymmetry via [Formula: see text] searches at the LHC, which should cover the low-mass regions of the CMSSM parameter space favoured in a recent global analysis. As we illustrate with a low-mass benchmark point, a discovery would make possible accurate LHC measurements of sparticle masses using the MT2 variable, which could be combined with cross-section and other measurements to constrain the gluino, squark and stop masses and hence the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] of the CMSSM. Slepton measurements at CLIC would enable [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] to be determined with high precision. If supersymmetry is indeed discovered in the low-mass region, precision electroweak and Higgs measurements with a future circular [Formula: see text] collider (FCC-ee, also known as TLEP) combined with LHC measurements would provide tests of the CMSSM at the loop level. If supersymmetry is not discovered at the LHC, it is likely to lie somewhere along a focus-point, stop-coannihilation strip or direct-channel A / H resonance funnel. We discuss the prospects for discovering supersymmetry along these strips at a future circular proton-proton collider such as FCC-hh. Illustrative benchmark points on these strips indicate that also in this case FCC-ee could provide tests of the CMSSM at the loop level.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The  plane in the CMSSM. The  2.30 (68 % CL) and 5.99 (95 % CL) regions found in recent global fits are bounded by solid red and blue lines, respectively. The best-fit point in the low-mass ‘Crimea’ regions is indicated by a filled green star. Also shown as solid black (purple, green) lines are the sensitivities of LHC   searches for exclusions at the 95 % CLs with 20/fb of data at 8 TeV (300, 3000/fb of data at 14 TeV). The purple contour is expected to coincide (within uncertainties) with the 5- discovery contour at the LHC with 3000/fb of data at 14 TeV
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Fig1: The plane in the CMSSM. The 2.30 (68 % CL) and 5.99 (95 % CL) regions found in recent global fits are bounded by solid red and blue lines, respectively. The best-fit point in the low-mass ‘Crimea’ regions is indicated by a filled green star. Also shown as solid black (purple, green) lines are the sensitivities of LHC   searches for exclusions at the 95 % CLs with 20/fb of data at 8 TeV (300, 3000/fb of data at 14 TeV). The purple contour is expected to coincide (within uncertainties) with the 5- discovery contour at the LHC with 3000/fb of data at 14 TeV

Mentions: The baseline for our studies is provided by a recent global fit to the parameters of the CMSSM [33].1 In addition to the ATLAS search for jets + events with 20/fb of 8 TeV data [3, 4], these global fits included the measurement of  [1, 2, 85] (which was related to the CMSSM parameters via calculations using FeynHiggs 2.10.0 [86–91]), electroweak precision observables and  [92, 93], precision flavour observables including  [94–97] and  [98–103], and dark matter observables including the direct LUX constraint on dark matter scattering [104] and the total cold dark matter density [105]. These measurements were combined into a global likelihood function, whose projection on the plane of the CMSSM is displayed in Fig. 1. In this and subsequent figures, we marginalise over the other CMSSM parameters and . We display in red and blue, respectively, and 5.99 contours (which we use as proxies for 68 and 95 % CL contours). For each set of values within these contours, there is some choice of and for which or 5.99, respectively, and outside these contours there are no choices of and that satisfy these conditions. In the figure, a low-mass “Crimea” region and a high-mass “Eurasia” region can be distinguished. The former consists of points in the stau-coannihilation region, and the latter includes points along rapid H / A annihilation funnels, and along the high-mass focus-point and stop-coannihilation strips we discuss in Sect. 6. We also show as a filled green star a representative best-fit point in the low-mass region, whose parameters are listed in Table 1. In the low-mass region, makes a significantly smaller contribution to the global function than in the high-mass region, although the CMSSM and related models could not by themselves resolve the discrepancy between the experimental measurement and the theoretical calculation within the Standard Model.2 We discuss later characteristics of points in the high-mass ‘Eurasia’ region: the likelihood function is relatively flat across this region, and there is no well-defined best-fit point that is favoured strongly with respect to other points.Fig. 1


Collider Interplay for Supersymmetry, Higgs and Dark Matter.

Buchmueller O, Citron M, Ellis J, Guha S, Marrouche J, Olive KA, de Vries K, Zheng J - Eur Phys J C Part Fields (2015)

The  plane in the CMSSM. The  2.30 (68 % CL) and 5.99 (95 % CL) regions found in recent global fits are bounded by solid red and blue lines, respectively. The best-fit point in the low-mass ‘Crimea’ regions is indicated by a filled green star. Also shown as solid black (purple, green) lines are the sensitivities of LHC   searches for exclusions at the 95 % CLs with 20/fb of data at 8 TeV (300, 3000/fb of data at 14 TeV). The purple contour is expected to coincide (within uncertainties) with the 5- discovery contour at the LHC with 3000/fb of data at 14 TeV
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591918&req=5

Fig1: The plane in the CMSSM. The 2.30 (68 % CL) and 5.99 (95 % CL) regions found in recent global fits are bounded by solid red and blue lines, respectively. The best-fit point in the low-mass ‘Crimea’ regions is indicated by a filled green star. Also shown as solid black (purple, green) lines are the sensitivities of LHC   searches for exclusions at the 95 % CLs with 20/fb of data at 8 TeV (300, 3000/fb of data at 14 TeV). The purple contour is expected to coincide (within uncertainties) with the 5- discovery contour at the LHC with 3000/fb of data at 14 TeV
Mentions: The baseline for our studies is provided by a recent global fit to the parameters of the CMSSM [33].1 In addition to the ATLAS search for jets + events with 20/fb of 8 TeV data [3, 4], these global fits included the measurement of  [1, 2, 85] (which was related to the CMSSM parameters via calculations using FeynHiggs 2.10.0 [86–91]), electroweak precision observables and  [92, 93], precision flavour observables including  [94–97] and  [98–103], and dark matter observables including the direct LUX constraint on dark matter scattering [104] and the total cold dark matter density [105]. These measurements were combined into a global likelihood function, whose projection on the plane of the CMSSM is displayed in Fig. 1. In this and subsequent figures, we marginalise over the other CMSSM parameters and . We display in red and blue, respectively, and 5.99 contours (which we use as proxies for 68 and 95 % CL contours). For each set of values within these contours, there is some choice of and for which or 5.99, respectively, and outside these contours there are no choices of and that satisfy these conditions. In the figure, a low-mass “Crimea” region and a high-mass “Eurasia” region can be distinguished. The former consists of points in the stau-coannihilation region, and the latter includes points along rapid H / A annihilation funnels, and along the high-mass focus-point and stop-coannihilation strips we discuss in Sect. 6. We also show as a filled green star a representative best-fit point in the low-mass region, whose parameters are listed in Table 1. In the low-mass region, makes a significantly smaller contribution to the global function than in the high-mass region, although the CMSSM and related models could not by themselves resolve the discrepancy between the experimental measurement and the theoretical calculation within the Standard Model.2 We discuss later characteristics of points in the high-mass ‘Eurasia’ region: the likelihood function is relatively flat across this region, and there is no well-defined best-fit point that is favoured strongly with respect to other points.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: If supersymmetry is not discovered at the LHC, it is likely to lie somewhere along a focus-point, stop-coannihilation strip or direct-channel A / H resonance funnel.We discuss the prospects for discovering supersymmetry along these strips at a future circular proton-proton collider such as FCC-hh.Illustrative benchmark points on these strips indicate that also in this case FCC-ee could provide tests of the CMSSM at the loop level.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Lab., Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ UK.

ABSTRACT

We discuss the potential impacts on the CMSSM of future LHC runs and possible [Formula: see text] and higher-energy proton-proton colliders, considering searches for supersymmetry via  [Formula: see text] events, precision electroweak physics, Higgs measurements and dark matter searches. We validate and present estimates of the physics reach for exclusion or discovery of supersymmetry via [Formula: see text] searches at the LHC, which should cover the low-mass regions of the CMSSM parameter space favoured in a recent global analysis. As we illustrate with a low-mass benchmark point, a discovery would make possible accurate LHC measurements of sparticle masses using the MT2 variable, which could be combined with cross-section and other measurements to constrain the gluino, squark and stop masses and hence the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] of the CMSSM. Slepton measurements at CLIC would enable [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] to be determined with high precision. If supersymmetry is indeed discovered in the low-mass region, precision electroweak and Higgs measurements with a future circular [Formula: see text] collider (FCC-ee, also known as TLEP) combined with LHC measurements would provide tests of the CMSSM at the loop level. If supersymmetry is not discovered at the LHC, it is likely to lie somewhere along a focus-point, stop-coannihilation strip or direct-channel A / H resonance funnel. We discuss the prospects for discovering supersymmetry along these strips at a future circular proton-proton collider such as FCC-hh. Illustrative benchmark points on these strips indicate that also in this case FCC-ee could provide tests of the CMSSM at the loop level.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus