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A revision of the Australian digger wasps in the genus Sphex (Hymenoptera, Sphecidae).

Dörfel TH, Ohl M - Zookeys (2015)

Bottom Line: Thirty-five species are recognized, of which 11 are new: Sphex argentatissimus, Sphex brevipetiolus, Sphex caelebs, Sphex corporosus, Sphex flammeus, Sphex fortunatus, Sphex gracilis, Sphex imporcatus, Sphex jucundus, Sphex latilobus and Sphex pretiosus.A dichotomous key covering all Australian species of the genus has been generated.The geographic distribution of all species is discussed based on all available locality records in relation to the Australian climate zones.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und Biodiversitätsforschung, Invalidenstraße 43, 10115 Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The Australian species of the sphecid wasp genus Sphex are revised. Thirty-five species are recognized, of which 11 are new: Sphex argentatissimus, Sphex brevipetiolus, Sphex caelebs, Sphex corporosus, Sphex flammeus, Sphex fortunatus, Sphex gracilis, Sphex imporcatus, Sphex jucundus, Sphex latilobus and Sphex pretiosus. A dichotomous key covering all Australian species of the genus has been generated. The geographic distribution of all species is discussed based on all available locality records in relation to the Australian climate zones.

No MeSH data available.


Species diversity compared to climate zones. A the numbers indicate how many different Sphex species were found in each of the Australian federal states (ACT not included); numbers in brackets depict how many of these are endemic to the state B Australian key climate groups based on a modified Köppen classification system; image source: Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology (Commonwealth of Australia 2014).
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Figure 43: Species diversity compared to climate zones. A the numbers indicate how many different Sphex species were found in each of the Australian federal states (ACT not included); numbers in brackets depict how many of these are endemic to the state B Australian key climate groups based on a modified Köppen classification system; image source: Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology (Commonwealth of Australia 2014).

Mentions: Using the gathered locality data of each species of Sphex, diversity and geographic distribution among countries and federal states was assessed at a more general level. Fig. 43A depicts this for Australia. As shown, Queensland is the state with the largest number of different Sphex species (19), while Western Australia is the one with the most endemic ones (6). New South Wales, while on par with Western Australia in its total number of species, completely lacks endemics. A possible explanation for this can be found in the Australian climate zones (Fig. 43B). Assuming that the deserts function more or less as a barrier against dispersal and hybridization, Sphex species from Western Australia (all of which are only known from the western half of the state) are much more geographically separated than those of the other states. On the other hand, New South Wales contains only a rather small desert area and shares all of its climate zones with at least one of the neighboring states, so species dispersal among these states is less constrained.


A revision of the Australian digger wasps in the genus Sphex (Hymenoptera, Sphecidae).

Dörfel TH, Ohl M - Zookeys (2015)

Species diversity compared to climate zones. A the numbers indicate how many different Sphex species were found in each of the Australian federal states (ACT not included); numbers in brackets depict how many of these are endemic to the state B Australian key climate groups based on a modified Köppen classification system; image source: Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology (Commonwealth of Australia 2014).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591716&req=5

Figure 43: Species diversity compared to climate zones. A the numbers indicate how many different Sphex species were found in each of the Australian federal states (ACT not included); numbers in brackets depict how many of these are endemic to the state B Australian key climate groups based on a modified Köppen classification system; image source: Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology (Commonwealth of Australia 2014).
Mentions: Using the gathered locality data of each species of Sphex, diversity and geographic distribution among countries and federal states was assessed at a more general level. Fig. 43A depicts this for Australia. As shown, Queensland is the state with the largest number of different Sphex species (19), while Western Australia is the one with the most endemic ones (6). New South Wales, while on par with Western Australia in its total number of species, completely lacks endemics. A possible explanation for this can be found in the Australian climate zones (Fig. 43B). Assuming that the deserts function more or less as a barrier against dispersal and hybridization, Sphex species from Western Australia (all of which are only known from the western half of the state) are much more geographically separated than those of the other states. On the other hand, New South Wales contains only a rather small desert area and shares all of its climate zones with at least one of the neighboring states, so species dispersal among these states is less constrained.

Bottom Line: Thirty-five species are recognized, of which 11 are new: Sphex argentatissimus, Sphex brevipetiolus, Sphex caelebs, Sphex corporosus, Sphex flammeus, Sphex fortunatus, Sphex gracilis, Sphex imporcatus, Sphex jucundus, Sphex latilobus and Sphex pretiosus.A dichotomous key covering all Australian species of the genus has been generated.The geographic distribution of all species is discussed based on all available locality records in relation to the Australian climate zones.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Museum für Naturkunde, Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und Biodiversitätsforschung, Invalidenstraße 43, 10115 Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The Australian species of the sphecid wasp genus Sphex are revised. Thirty-five species are recognized, of which 11 are new: Sphex argentatissimus, Sphex brevipetiolus, Sphex caelebs, Sphex corporosus, Sphex flammeus, Sphex fortunatus, Sphex gracilis, Sphex imporcatus, Sphex jucundus, Sphex latilobus and Sphex pretiosus. A dichotomous key covering all Australian species of the genus has been generated. The geographic distribution of all species is discussed based on all available locality records in relation to the Australian climate zones.

No MeSH data available.