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Six-month quality-of-life and functional status of acute respiratory distress syndrome survivors compared to patients at risk: a population-based study.

Biehl M, Kashyap R, Ahmed AH, Reriani MK, Ofoma UR, Wilson GA, Li G, Malinchoc M, Sloan JA, Gajic O - Crit Care (2015)

Bottom Line: The primary outcomes were changes in QOL and functional status, measured through 12-Item Short Form Survey (SF-12) and Barthel Index (BI) respectively, from baseline to 6 months, compared between survivors who did and did not develop ARDS.Both ARDS and non-ARDS groups had lower physical component of SF-12 at baseline compared to general population (P < 0.001 for both).In this population-based study, decreased QOL and functional status 6 months after hospitalization were largely explained by baseline condition, with similar recovery in survivors who did and did not develop ARDS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multidisciplinary Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (METRIC) Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. mibiehl@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The long-term attributable burden related to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is not fully investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) and functional status at 6 months after hospitalization in patients at risk for ARDS who did and did not develop the syndrome.

Method: This is a population-based prospective cohort study of adult patients from Olmsted County, Minnesota, with or at risk for ARDS hospitalized from October 2008 to July 2011. The primary outcomes were changes in QOL and functional status, measured through 12-Item Short Form Survey (SF-12) and Barthel Index (BI) respectively, from baseline to 6 months, compared between survivors who did and did not develop ARDS.

Results: Of 410 patients with or at risk for ARDS, 98 had baseline surveys collected and 67 responded to a 6-month survey (26 ARDS, 41 non-ARDS). Both ARDS and non-ARDS groups had lower physical component of SF-12 at baseline compared to general population (P < 0.001 for both). ARDS patients had poorer baseline functional status compared to non-ARDS (mean BI 80 ± 25 vs. 88 ± 22, P = 0.03). No significant differences were observed for the change between 6 months and baseline BI (delta 2.3 for ARDS vs. 2.0 for non-ARDS, P = 0.5), or mental (delta 2.7 vs. 2.4, P = 0.9) or physical (delta -3 vs. -3.3, P = 0.9) component of SF-12 between survivors with and without ARDS.

Conclusion: In this population-based study, decreased QOL and functional status 6 months after hospitalization were largely explained by baseline condition, with similar recovery in survivors who did and did not develop ARDS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mental and physical component scores for the 12-item Short Form Survey (SF-12) measured at baseline and 6 months in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and patients without ARDS (non-ARDS). MCS mental component score, PCS physical component score
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Fig2: Mental and physical component scores for the 12-item Short Form Survey (SF-12) measured at baseline and 6 months in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and patients without ARDS (non-ARDS). MCS mental component score, PCS physical component score

Mentions: There was no within-patient difference in the mental component score 6 months post baseline, either in the ARDS (49.7 at baseline vs. 46.9 at 6 months) or in the non-ARDS groups (51.3 vs. 48.9) (Table 2). There was also no difference in the mental component of SF-12 at baseline or at 6 months between patients with and without ARDS. Furthermore, there was no difference when we compared the change in mental component score (delta 6 months – baseline) between the two groups (Table 2 and Fig. 2). Overall the baseline mental component scores of SF-12 in both groups were comparable to the healthy population (SF-12 score of 50).Table 2


Six-month quality-of-life and functional status of acute respiratory distress syndrome survivors compared to patients at risk: a population-based study.

Biehl M, Kashyap R, Ahmed AH, Reriani MK, Ofoma UR, Wilson GA, Li G, Malinchoc M, Sloan JA, Gajic O - Crit Care (2015)

Mental and physical component scores for the 12-item Short Form Survey (SF-12) measured at baseline and 6 months in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and patients without ARDS (non-ARDS). MCS mental component score, PCS physical component score
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591714&req=5

Fig2: Mental and physical component scores for the 12-item Short Form Survey (SF-12) measured at baseline and 6 months in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and patients without ARDS (non-ARDS). MCS mental component score, PCS physical component score
Mentions: There was no within-patient difference in the mental component score 6 months post baseline, either in the ARDS (49.7 at baseline vs. 46.9 at 6 months) or in the non-ARDS groups (51.3 vs. 48.9) (Table 2). There was also no difference in the mental component of SF-12 at baseline or at 6 months between patients with and without ARDS. Furthermore, there was no difference when we compared the change in mental component score (delta 6 months – baseline) between the two groups (Table 2 and Fig. 2). Overall the baseline mental component scores of SF-12 in both groups were comparable to the healthy population (SF-12 score of 50).Table 2

Bottom Line: The primary outcomes were changes in QOL and functional status, measured through 12-Item Short Form Survey (SF-12) and Barthel Index (BI) respectively, from baseline to 6 months, compared between survivors who did and did not develop ARDS.Both ARDS and non-ARDS groups had lower physical component of SF-12 at baseline compared to general population (P < 0.001 for both).In this population-based study, decreased QOL and functional status 6 months after hospitalization were largely explained by baseline condition, with similar recovery in survivors who did and did not develop ARDS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multidisciplinary Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (METRIC) Group, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. mibiehl@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The long-term attributable burden related to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is not fully investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) and functional status at 6 months after hospitalization in patients at risk for ARDS who did and did not develop the syndrome.

Method: This is a population-based prospective cohort study of adult patients from Olmsted County, Minnesota, with or at risk for ARDS hospitalized from October 2008 to July 2011. The primary outcomes were changes in QOL and functional status, measured through 12-Item Short Form Survey (SF-12) and Barthel Index (BI) respectively, from baseline to 6 months, compared between survivors who did and did not develop ARDS.

Results: Of 410 patients with or at risk for ARDS, 98 had baseline surveys collected and 67 responded to a 6-month survey (26 ARDS, 41 non-ARDS). Both ARDS and non-ARDS groups had lower physical component of SF-12 at baseline compared to general population (P < 0.001 for both). ARDS patients had poorer baseline functional status compared to non-ARDS (mean BI 80 ± 25 vs. 88 ± 22, P = 0.03). No significant differences were observed for the change between 6 months and baseline BI (delta 2.3 for ARDS vs. 2.0 for non-ARDS, P = 0.5), or mental (delta 2.7 vs. 2.4, P = 0.9) or physical (delta -3 vs. -3.3, P = 0.9) component of SF-12 between survivors with and without ARDS.

Conclusion: In this population-based study, decreased QOL and functional status 6 months after hospitalization were largely explained by baseline condition, with similar recovery in survivors who did and did not develop ARDS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus