Limits...
Maternal and reproductive health financing in Burundi: public-sector contribution levels and trends from 2010 to 2012.

Chaumont C, Muhorane C, Moreira-Burgos I, Juma N, Avila-Burgos L - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The flow patterns and levels of public funds to RH in Burundi suggest that RH funding correctly reflects governmental priorities for the period between 2010 and 2012.In a context of general shrinking donor commitment, local governments have come to play a key role in ensuring the efficient use of available resources and the mobilizing of additional domestic funding.A strong and transparent financial tracking system is key to carrying out this role and making progress towards the MDG Goals and development beyond 2015.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Health Systems Research, National Institute of Public Health, Universidad No. 655 Colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán, Cerrada Los Pinos y Caminera, C.P. 62100, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. claire.chaumont@insp.mx.

ABSTRACT

Background: An understanding of public financial flows to reproductive health (RH) at the country level is key to assessing the extent to which they correspond to political commitments. This is especially relevant for low-income countries facing important challenges in the area of RH. To this end, the present study analyzes public expenditure levels and trends with regards to RH in Burundi between the years 2010 to 2012, looking specifically at financing agents, health providers, and health functions.

Methods: The analysis was performed using standard RH sub-account methodology. Information regarding public expenditures was gathered from national budgets, the Burundi Ministry of Public Health information system, and from other relevant public institutions.

Results: Public RH expenditures in Burundi accounted for $41.163 million international dollars in 2012, which represents an increase of 16 % from 2010. In 2012, this sum represented 0.57 % of the national GDP. The share of total public health spending allocated to RH increased from 15 % in 2010 to 19 % in 2012. In terms of public agents involved in RH financing, the Ministry of Public Health proved to play the most important role. Half of all public RH spending went to primary health care clinics, while more than 70 % of this money was used for maternal health; average public RH spending per woman of childbearing age stagnated during the study period.

Conclusions: The flow patterns and levels of public funds to RH in Burundi suggest that RH funding correctly reflects governmental priorities for the period between 2010 and 2012. In a context of general shrinking donor commitment, local governments have come to play a key role in ensuring the efficient use of available resources and the mobilizing of additional domestic funding. A strong and transparent financial tracking system is key to carrying out this role and making progress towards the MDG Goals and development beyond 2015.

No MeSH data available.


Financial Sources, Financial Agents, Health Providers and Health Functions related to public-sector financial contributions for reproductive health activities, Burundi
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591700&req=5

Fig1: Financial Sources, Financial Agents, Health Providers and Health Functions related to public-sector financial contributions for reproductive health activities, Burundi

Mentions: Overall, the health sector remains heavily dependent on external aid, which accounted for 40 % of total health expenditures in the country in 2007. An additional 43 % was covered by the private sector — mainly household or out-of-pocket expenditures (OOPs) — while the public sector accounted for the remaining 17 %. Part of the external aid is channeled through the public sector, which controls and manages 38 % of all health expenditures [26]. As part of the public sector, the Ministry of Public Health and Fight Against AIDS (MSPLS in French) acts as the primary financing agent. Other public agencies managing healthcare funds include the Ministry of National Defense and the Ministry of Public Security, which finance the healthcare of their respective employees, the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, which funds and manages the Teaching Hospital of Kamenge (CHUK), the Ministry of National Solidarity, Human and Gender Rights, which covers healthcare expenses for indigent populations, and Civil Service Mutual Insurance (MFP), the social security institution serving public employees throughout the country. Other ministries and public institutions also contribute funds to the healthcare system, though they simply make a financial contribution to the MFP on behalf of their employees. These actors account for the bulk of the public funding and provision of reproductive healthcare activities (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Maternal and reproductive health financing in Burundi: public-sector contribution levels and trends from 2010 to 2012.

Chaumont C, Muhorane C, Moreira-Burgos I, Juma N, Avila-Burgos L - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Financial Sources, Financial Agents, Health Providers and Health Functions related to public-sector financial contributions for reproductive health activities, Burundi
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591700&req=5

Fig1: Financial Sources, Financial Agents, Health Providers and Health Functions related to public-sector financial contributions for reproductive health activities, Burundi
Mentions: Overall, the health sector remains heavily dependent on external aid, which accounted for 40 % of total health expenditures in the country in 2007. An additional 43 % was covered by the private sector — mainly household or out-of-pocket expenditures (OOPs) — while the public sector accounted for the remaining 17 %. Part of the external aid is channeled through the public sector, which controls and manages 38 % of all health expenditures [26]. As part of the public sector, the Ministry of Public Health and Fight Against AIDS (MSPLS in French) acts as the primary financing agent. Other public agencies managing healthcare funds include the Ministry of National Defense and the Ministry of Public Security, which finance the healthcare of their respective employees, the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, which funds and manages the Teaching Hospital of Kamenge (CHUK), the Ministry of National Solidarity, Human and Gender Rights, which covers healthcare expenses for indigent populations, and Civil Service Mutual Insurance (MFP), the social security institution serving public employees throughout the country. Other ministries and public institutions also contribute funds to the healthcare system, though they simply make a financial contribution to the MFP on behalf of their employees. These actors account for the bulk of the public funding and provision of reproductive healthcare activities (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The flow patterns and levels of public funds to RH in Burundi suggest that RH funding correctly reflects governmental priorities for the period between 2010 and 2012.In a context of general shrinking donor commitment, local governments have come to play a key role in ensuring the efficient use of available resources and the mobilizing of additional domestic funding.A strong and transparent financial tracking system is key to carrying out this role and making progress towards the MDG Goals and development beyond 2015.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Health Systems Research, National Institute of Public Health, Universidad No. 655 Colonia Santa María Ahuacatitlán, Cerrada Los Pinos y Caminera, C.P. 62100, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico. claire.chaumont@insp.mx.

ABSTRACT

Background: An understanding of public financial flows to reproductive health (RH) at the country level is key to assessing the extent to which they correspond to political commitments. This is especially relevant for low-income countries facing important challenges in the area of RH. To this end, the present study analyzes public expenditure levels and trends with regards to RH in Burundi between the years 2010 to 2012, looking specifically at financing agents, health providers, and health functions.

Methods: The analysis was performed using standard RH sub-account methodology. Information regarding public expenditures was gathered from national budgets, the Burundi Ministry of Public Health information system, and from other relevant public institutions.

Results: Public RH expenditures in Burundi accounted for $41.163 million international dollars in 2012, which represents an increase of 16 % from 2010. In 2012, this sum represented 0.57 % of the national GDP. The share of total public health spending allocated to RH increased from 15 % in 2010 to 19 % in 2012. In terms of public agents involved in RH financing, the Ministry of Public Health proved to play the most important role. Half of all public RH spending went to primary health care clinics, while more than 70 % of this money was used for maternal health; average public RH spending per woman of childbearing age stagnated during the study period.

Conclusions: The flow patterns and levels of public funds to RH in Burundi suggest that RH funding correctly reflects governmental priorities for the period between 2010 and 2012. In a context of general shrinking donor commitment, local governments have come to play a key role in ensuring the efficient use of available resources and the mobilizing of additional domestic funding. A strong and transparent financial tracking system is key to carrying out this role and making progress towards the MDG Goals and development beyond 2015.

No MeSH data available.