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Sequential light programs shape kale (Brassica napus) sprout appearance and alter metabolic and nutrient content.

Carvalho SD, Folta KM - Hortic Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Different light wavelengths have specific effects on plant growth and development.Sequential treatments of darkness, blue light, red light and far-red light were applied throughout sprout development to alter final product quality.These results indicate that sequential treatment with narrow-bandwidth light may be used to affect key economically important traits in high-value crops.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida , Gainesville, FL, USA ; Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Florida , Gainesville, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT
Different light wavelengths have specific effects on plant growth and development. Narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode (LED) lighting may be used to directionally manipulate size, color and metabolites in high-value fruits and vegetables. In this report, Red Russian kale (Brassica napus) seedlings were grown under specific light conditions and analyzed for photomorphogenic responses, pigment accumulation and nutraceutical content. The results showed that this genotype responds predictably to darkness, blue and red light, with suppression of hypocotyl elongation, development of pigments and changes in specific metabolites. However, these seedlings were relatively hypersensitive to far-red light, leading to uncharacteristically short hypocotyls and high pigment accumulation, even after growth under very low fluence rates (<1 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). General antioxidant levels and aliphatic glucosinolates are elevated by far-red light treatments. Sequential treatments of darkness, blue light, red light and far-red light were applied throughout sprout development to alter final product quality. These results indicate that sequential treatment with narrow-bandwidth light may be used to affect key economically important traits in high-value crops.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of light wavelength on the antioxidant capacity of Red Russian kale seedlings. TEs in 4-day-old seedlings grown under continuous darkness or 50 µmol m−2 s−1 fluence rate of the indicated light conditions. Results are representative of three independent experiments. Means±s.e., n=3. s.e., standard error.
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fig7: Effect of light wavelength on the antioxidant capacity of Red Russian kale seedlings. TEs in 4-day-old seedlings grown under continuous darkness or 50 µmol m−2 s−1 fluence rate of the indicated light conditions. Results are representative of three independent experiments. Means±s.e., n=3. s.e., standard error.

Mentions: Wavelength-specific effects on anthocyanins and chlorophyll are conspicuous and quantifiable. These data suggest that there may be concomitant changes in antioxidant agents and/or GLs, two classes of compounds with reported health benefits.19–21 To test this hypothesis, total antioxidant capacity of kale seedlings grown under different light wavelengths was assessed using the ORAC-FL assay.17,18 This method is based on the capacity of any putative antioxidant agent to quench the activity of a peroxyl radical generator that induces a decay in fluorescence emitted by a fluorescent compound. The calculations are made using as a standard the Trolox reagent, a vitamin C analog, and therefore, the quantitative results indicate the antioxidant capacity of any sample by giving its concentration of Trolox equivalents (TEs). For this test, kale seedlings were grown for 4 days in darkness or under a single fluence rate (50 µmol m−2 s−1) of different light wavelengths. The results show that far-red induces the highest TE accumulation (Figure 7), approximately 25% higher than under white or blue light. In contrast, red light-grown seedlings have a TE concentration much lower than in any other light regime, albeit double the basal level of dark-grown seedlings.


Sequential light programs shape kale (Brassica napus) sprout appearance and alter metabolic and nutrient content.

Carvalho SD, Folta KM - Hortic Res (2014)

Effect of light wavelength on the antioxidant capacity of Red Russian kale seedlings. TEs in 4-day-old seedlings grown under continuous darkness or 50 µmol m−2 s−1 fluence rate of the indicated light conditions. Results are representative of three independent experiments. Means±s.e., n=3. s.e., standard error.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591675&req=5

fig7: Effect of light wavelength on the antioxidant capacity of Red Russian kale seedlings. TEs in 4-day-old seedlings grown under continuous darkness or 50 µmol m−2 s−1 fluence rate of the indicated light conditions. Results are representative of three independent experiments. Means±s.e., n=3. s.e., standard error.
Mentions: Wavelength-specific effects on anthocyanins and chlorophyll are conspicuous and quantifiable. These data suggest that there may be concomitant changes in antioxidant agents and/or GLs, two classes of compounds with reported health benefits.19–21 To test this hypothesis, total antioxidant capacity of kale seedlings grown under different light wavelengths was assessed using the ORAC-FL assay.17,18 This method is based on the capacity of any putative antioxidant agent to quench the activity of a peroxyl radical generator that induces a decay in fluorescence emitted by a fluorescent compound. The calculations are made using as a standard the Trolox reagent, a vitamin C analog, and therefore, the quantitative results indicate the antioxidant capacity of any sample by giving its concentration of Trolox equivalents (TEs). For this test, kale seedlings were grown for 4 days in darkness or under a single fluence rate (50 µmol m−2 s−1) of different light wavelengths. The results show that far-red induces the highest TE accumulation (Figure 7), approximately 25% higher than under white or blue light. In contrast, red light-grown seedlings have a TE concentration much lower than in any other light regime, albeit double the basal level of dark-grown seedlings.

Bottom Line: Different light wavelengths have specific effects on plant growth and development.Sequential treatments of darkness, blue light, red light and far-red light were applied throughout sprout development to alter final product quality.These results indicate that sequential treatment with narrow-bandwidth light may be used to affect key economically important traits in high-value crops.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Horticultural Sciences Department, University of Florida , Gainesville, FL, USA ; Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Florida , Gainesville, FL, USA.

ABSTRACT
Different light wavelengths have specific effects on plant growth and development. Narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode (LED) lighting may be used to directionally manipulate size, color and metabolites in high-value fruits and vegetables. In this report, Red Russian kale (Brassica napus) seedlings were grown under specific light conditions and analyzed for photomorphogenic responses, pigment accumulation and nutraceutical content. The results showed that this genotype responds predictably to darkness, blue and red light, with suppression of hypocotyl elongation, development of pigments and changes in specific metabolites. However, these seedlings were relatively hypersensitive to far-red light, leading to uncharacteristically short hypocotyls and high pigment accumulation, even after growth under very low fluence rates (<1 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). General antioxidant levels and aliphatic glucosinolates are elevated by far-red light treatments. Sequential treatments of darkness, blue light, red light and far-red light were applied throughout sprout development to alter final product quality. These results indicate that sequential treatment with narrow-bandwidth light may be used to affect key economically important traits in high-value crops.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus