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Molecular genetics and genomics of the Rosoideae: state of the art and future perspectives.

Longhi S, Giongo L, Buti M, Surbanovski N, Viola R, Velasco R, Ward JA, Sargent DJ - Hortic Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Molecular genetics and genomics resources for the Rosoideae have developed rapidly over the past two decades, beginning with the development and application of a number of molecular marker types including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, amplified fragment length polymorphisms and microsatellites, and culminating in the recent publication of the genome sequence of the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, and the development of high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping resources for Fragaria, Rosa and Rubus.These tools have been used to identify genes and other functional elements that control traits of economic importance, to study the evolution of plant genome structure within the subfamily, and are beginning to facilitate genomic-assisted breeding through the development and deployment of markers linked to traits such as aspects of fruit quality, disease resistance and the timing of flowering.In this review, we report on the developments that have been made over the last 20 years in the field of molecular genetics and structural genomics within the Rosoideae, comment on how the knowledge gained will improve the efficiency of cultivar development and discuss how these advances will enhance our understanding of the biological processes determining agronomically important traits in all Rosoideae species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Innovation Centre , Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The Rosoideae is a subfamily of the Rosaceae that contains a number of species of economic importance, including the soft fruit species strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa), red (Rubus idaeus) and black (Rubus occidentalis) raspberries, blackberries (Rubus spp.) and one of the most economically important cut flower genera, the roses (Rosa spp.). Molecular genetics and genomics resources for the Rosoideae have developed rapidly over the past two decades, beginning with the development and application of a number of molecular marker types including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, amplified fragment length polymorphisms and microsatellites, and culminating in the recent publication of the genome sequence of the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, and the development of high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping resources for Fragaria, Rosa and Rubus. These tools have been used to identify genes and other functional elements that control traits of economic importance, to study the evolution of plant genome structure within the subfamily, and are beginning to facilitate genomic-assisted breeding through the development and deployment of markers linked to traits such as aspects of fruit quality, disease resistance and the timing of flowering. In this review, we report on the developments that have been made over the last 20 years in the field of molecular genetics and structural genomics within the Rosoideae, comment on how the knowledge gained will improve the efficiency of cultivar development and discuss how these advances will enhance our understanding of the biological processes determining agronomically important traits in all Rosoideae species.

No MeSH data available.


The SSR- and SNP-based linkage map of the cultivar H×T mapping population developed by Ward et al.79 comprising 33 SSR markers and 4521 SNP markers in 487 genotyping bins distributed throughout the seven linkage groups of the Rubus genome. Genetic distances are given in centiMorgan, cM.
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fig2: The SSR- and SNP-based linkage map of the cultivar H×T mapping population developed by Ward et al.79 comprising 33 SSR markers and 4521 SNP markers in 487 genotyping bins distributed throughout the seven linkage groups of the Rubus genome. Genetic distances are given in centiMorgan, cM.

Mentions: The most comprehensive linkage maps for red raspberry produced to date were reported recently by Ward et al.79 Using GBS to generate SNP markers, supplemented with a genome-spanning SSR set, the authors produced highly saturated linkage maps of the parental lines of a mapping progeny produced from the cross Heritage × Tulameen (H×T) comprising 71 progeny. The study revealed almost twice the number of heterozygous markers in the Heritage genome than in the Tulameen genome. Linkage maps were composed only of markers segregating in the individual parental genotypes and spanned 462.7 cM across seven linkage groups containing a total of 4521 SNP and 33 SSR markers in 487 genotyping bins on the Heritage linkage map, and 376.6 cM across seven linkage groups containing a total of 2391 SNP and 12 SSR markers in 274 genotyping bins on the Tulameen linkage map (Figure 2).


Molecular genetics and genomics of the Rosoideae: state of the art and future perspectives.

Longhi S, Giongo L, Buti M, Surbanovski N, Viola R, Velasco R, Ward JA, Sargent DJ - Hortic Res (2014)

The SSR- and SNP-based linkage map of the cultivar H×T mapping population developed by Ward et al.79 comprising 33 SSR markers and 4521 SNP markers in 487 genotyping bins distributed throughout the seven linkage groups of the Rubus genome. Genetic distances are given in centiMorgan, cM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591673&req=5

fig2: The SSR- and SNP-based linkage map of the cultivar H×T mapping population developed by Ward et al.79 comprising 33 SSR markers and 4521 SNP markers in 487 genotyping bins distributed throughout the seven linkage groups of the Rubus genome. Genetic distances are given in centiMorgan, cM.
Mentions: The most comprehensive linkage maps for red raspberry produced to date were reported recently by Ward et al.79 Using GBS to generate SNP markers, supplemented with a genome-spanning SSR set, the authors produced highly saturated linkage maps of the parental lines of a mapping progeny produced from the cross Heritage × Tulameen (H×T) comprising 71 progeny. The study revealed almost twice the number of heterozygous markers in the Heritage genome than in the Tulameen genome. Linkage maps were composed only of markers segregating in the individual parental genotypes and spanned 462.7 cM across seven linkage groups containing a total of 4521 SNP and 33 SSR markers in 487 genotyping bins on the Heritage linkage map, and 376.6 cM across seven linkage groups containing a total of 2391 SNP and 12 SSR markers in 274 genotyping bins on the Tulameen linkage map (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Molecular genetics and genomics resources for the Rosoideae have developed rapidly over the past two decades, beginning with the development and application of a number of molecular marker types including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, amplified fragment length polymorphisms and microsatellites, and culminating in the recent publication of the genome sequence of the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, and the development of high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping resources for Fragaria, Rosa and Rubus.These tools have been used to identify genes and other functional elements that control traits of economic importance, to study the evolution of plant genome structure within the subfamily, and are beginning to facilitate genomic-assisted breeding through the development and deployment of markers linked to traits such as aspects of fruit quality, disease resistance and the timing of flowering.In this review, we report on the developments that have been made over the last 20 years in the field of molecular genetics and structural genomics within the Rosoideae, comment on how the knowledge gained will improve the efficiency of cultivar development and discuss how these advances will enhance our understanding of the biological processes determining agronomically important traits in all Rosoideae species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Innovation Centre , Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The Rosoideae is a subfamily of the Rosaceae that contains a number of species of economic importance, including the soft fruit species strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa), red (Rubus idaeus) and black (Rubus occidentalis) raspberries, blackberries (Rubus spp.) and one of the most economically important cut flower genera, the roses (Rosa spp.). Molecular genetics and genomics resources for the Rosoideae have developed rapidly over the past two decades, beginning with the development and application of a number of molecular marker types including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, amplified fragment length polymorphisms and microsatellites, and culminating in the recent publication of the genome sequence of the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca, and the development of high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-genotyping resources for Fragaria, Rosa and Rubus. These tools have been used to identify genes and other functional elements that control traits of economic importance, to study the evolution of plant genome structure within the subfamily, and are beginning to facilitate genomic-assisted breeding through the development and deployment of markers linked to traits such as aspects of fruit quality, disease resistance and the timing of flowering. In this review, we report on the developments that have been made over the last 20 years in the field of molecular genetics and structural genomics within the Rosoideae, comment on how the knowledge gained will improve the efficiency of cultivar development and discuss how these advances will enhance our understanding of the biological processes determining agronomically important traits in all Rosoideae species.

No MeSH data available.