Limits...
Gold nanoparticle-labeled biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens.

Wang Y, Alocilja EC - J Biol Eng (2015)

Bottom Line: By measuring the amount of AuNPs through an electrochemical method, the presence and the amount of the target bacteria were determined.Results showed a sensitivity of 10(1) colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml) with a linear range of 10(1)-10(6) cfu/ml.Compared to conventional culture plating methods, the biosensor reduced the detection time from 2 to 4 days to less than 1 hour with a simple target extraction method.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 USA ; Present address: Division of Food Processing Science and Technology, U. S. Food and Drug Administration, Bedford Park, IL 60501 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one of the major foodborne bacterial pathogens and also a biodefense agent. To ensure food safety and public health, it is very important to develop rapid methods for E. coli O157:H7 detection. In this study, we designed a nanoparticle-labeled biosensor for the rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7 in broth.

Results: Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were conjugated with monoclonal antibodies (Abs) to separate target E. coli O157:H7 cells from broth samples. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were conjugated with polyclonal Abs, and were then introduced to the MNP-target complex to form a sandwich MNP-target-AuNP. By measuring the amount of AuNPs through an electrochemical method, the presence and the amount of the target bacteria were determined. Results showed a sensitivity of 10(1) colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml) with a linear range of 10(1)-10(6) cfu/ml.

Conclusions: Compared to conventional culture plating methods, the biosensor reduced the detection time from 2 to 4 days to less than 1 hour with a simple target extraction method. The AuNP-labeled biosensor has potential applications in the rapid detection of infectious agents for public health, biodefense, and food/water safety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a Schematic of the conjugation of Polyaniline (PANI)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and antibody; and (b) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of an antibody-conjugated MNP bound to an E.coli O157:H7 cell [6]; used with permission from International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health (Inderscience retains copyright of the original article and figure)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591638&req=5

Fig3: a Schematic of the conjugation of Polyaniline (PANI)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and antibody; and (b) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of an antibody-conjugated MNP bound to an E.coli O157:H7 cell [6]; used with permission from International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health (Inderscience retains copyright of the original article and figure)

Mentions: Electrostatic interaction has been used to modify the PANI-coated MNPs with antibody. The interaction between the negatively charged Fc fragment of antibody molecules and the positively charged PANI contributes to the conjugation [18]. Figure 3a shows a schematic of the interaction between the PANI-coated MNPs and the antibody.Fig. 3


Gold nanoparticle-labeled biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens.

Wang Y, Alocilja EC - J Biol Eng (2015)

a Schematic of the conjugation of Polyaniline (PANI)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and antibody; and (b) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of an antibody-conjugated MNP bound to an E.coli O157:H7 cell [6]; used with permission from International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health (Inderscience retains copyright of the original article and figure)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591638&req=5

Fig3: a Schematic of the conjugation of Polyaniline (PANI)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and antibody; and (b) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of an antibody-conjugated MNP bound to an E.coli O157:H7 cell [6]; used with permission from International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health (Inderscience retains copyright of the original article and figure)
Mentions: Electrostatic interaction has been used to modify the PANI-coated MNPs with antibody. The interaction between the negatively charged Fc fragment of antibody molecules and the positively charged PANI contributes to the conjugation [18]. Figure 3a shows a schematic of the interaction between the PANI-coated MNPs and the antibody.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: By measuring the amount of AuNPs through an electrochemical method, the presence and the amount of the target bacteria were determined.Results showed a sensitivity of 10(1) colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml) with a linear range of 10(1)-10(6) cfu/ml.Compared to conventional culture plating methods, the biosensor reduced the detection time from 2 to 4 days to less than 1 hour with a simple target extraction method.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 USA ; Present address: Division of Food Processing Science and Technology, U. S. Food and Drug Administration, Bedford Park, IL 60501 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one of the major foodborne bacterial pathogens and also a biodefense agent. To ensure food safety and public health, it is very important to develop rapid methods for E. coli O157:H7 detection. In this study, we designed a nanoparticle-labeled biosensor for the rapid detection of E. coli O157:H7 in broth.

Results: Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were conjugated with monoclonal antibodies (Abs) to separate target E. coli O157:H7 cells from broth samples. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were conjugated with polyclonal Abs, and were then introduced to the MNP-target complex to form a sandwich MNP-target-AuNP. By measuring the amount of AuNPs through an electrochemical method, the presence and the amount of the target bacteria were determined. Results showed a sensitivity of 10(1) colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml) with a linear range of 10(1)-10(6) cfu/ml.

Conclusions: Compared to conventional culture plating methods, the biosensor reduced the detection time from 2 to 4 days to less than 1 hour with a simple target extraction method. The AuNP-labeled biosensor has potential applications in the rapid detection of infectious agents for public health, biodefense, and food/water safety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus