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Excessive adiposity, metabolic health, and risks for genital human papillomavirus infection in adult women: a population-based cross-sectional study.

Liu SH, Chen HJ, Hsieh TH, Chen JC, Huang YC - BMC Obes (2015)

Bottom Line: In contrary to findings for the general population, HR-HPV prevalence was decreased in a subgroup of women with obesity or central obesity.Possible explanations for such heterogeneity included less risky sexual behaviors, an altered immune milieu that promoted viral clearance, and increased access to healthcare resources due to other obesity-related co-morbidities in this subpopulation.Obesity or central obesity was not significantly associated with prevalent any-type or HR-type HPV infection among adult women in general.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Wen Hwa 1st Rd., Gueishan District, Taoyuan City, 333 Taiwan ; Department of Family Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, 5 Fuhsin Street, Gueishan District, Taoyuan City, 333 Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The role of excessive adiposity or its metabolic consequences in persistent HPV infection among general adult women remains unknown.

Methods: Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2003-2010, we compared adult women's likelihood for any- or high-risk (HR) type HPV infection by degrees of excessive adiposity and metabolic health status.

Results: Any-type (41.1 % vs. 44.9 %, P = 0.045) or HR-type HPV prevalence (21.9 % vs. 25.4 %, P = 0.055) was comparable in women aged 20-59 years with or without central obesity. After adjusting for age, socioeconomic indicators, and lifetime sexual risks, centrally-obese women barely showed a different likelihood for any-type (aPR [adjusted prevalence ratio] = 0.91, P = 0.03) or HR-HPV infection (aPR = 0.92, P = 0.279). However, obesity (aPR = 0.76, P = 0.017) or centrally-obesity (aPR = 0.72, P = 0.003) was negatively correlated with HR-HPV infection in women reporting an early sex debut (<16 years; P for interaction <0.05). In the fasting subpopulation, obesity (aPR = 0.77, P = 0.016) or metabolically unhealthy obesity (aPR = 0.69, P = 0.018) was significantly correlated with a 23 % or 31 % reduced prevalence of HR-HPV infection.

Discussion: In contrary to findings for the general population, HR-HPV prevalence was decreased in a subgroup of women with obesity or central obesity. Possible explanations for such heterogeneity included less risky sexual behaviors, an altered immune milieu that promoted viral clearance, and increased access to healthcare resources due to other obesity-related co-morbidities in this subpopulation.

Conclusions: Obesity or central obesity was not significantly associated with prevalent any-type or HR-type HPV infection among adult women in general. However, in certain subpopulations, excessive adiposity or its relevant metabolic dysfunction was negatively associated with HR-HPV infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age-specific prevalence of central obesity, obesity, any-type HPV and high risk (HR) type HPV in adult women enrolled in NHANES 2003–2010. Weighted prevalence estimates for women with central obesity, obesity, positive HPV DNA testing for any type or high-risk (or, oncogenic) types were displayed on the same graph. These single-year estimates for each age group were averages across the four survey cycles, despite of some variations, showing a generally increasing (for excessive adiposity) or decreasing trend (for HPV infection) towards older age. While these age-associated variations in central obesity and obesity parallel with each other, any-type and HR-type HPV prevalence became discordant around ages 40–44 years, at which time there was an apparent dip in HR-HPV prevalence
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Fig1: Age-specific prevalence of central obesity, obesity, any-type HPV and high risk (HR) type HPV in adult women enrolled in NHANES 2003–2010. Weighted prevalence estimates for women with central obesity, obesity, positive HPV DNA testing for any type or high-risk (or, oncogenic) types were displayed on the same graph. These single-year estimates for each age group were averages across the four survey cycles, despite of some variations, showing a generally increasing (for excessive adiposity) or decreasing trend (for HPV infection) towards older age. While these age-associated variations in central obesity and obesity parallel with each other, any-type and HR-type HPV prevalence became discordant around ages 40–44 years, at which time there was an apparent dip in HR-HPV prevalence

Mentions: Women with central obesity had a slightly reduced (any-type: 41.1 % vs. 44.9 %, P = 0.045) or comparable (HR-type: 21.9 % vs. 25.4 %, P = 0.055) HPV prevalence. BMI-based adiposity measures, such as obesity (P = 0.451 for any-HPV; P = 0.191 for HR-HPV) and BMI categories (P = 0.36 for any-HPV; P = 0.345 for HR-HPV), were not associated with HPV prevalence (Table 1). Except for a diabetic history and current use of oral contraceptives, women who were positive for any-type and HR-type HPV DNA testing were likely to be young (Fig. 1) and shared common socio-demographic and behavioral risk factors (all P-values <0.001, Table 1). After adjusting for age, socio-economic factors and risky behaviors, centrally-obese women had a 9 % reduced prevalence for any-HPV (aPR = 0.91, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.84–0.99; P = 0.03) but not for HR-HPV (aPR = 0.92, 95 % CI = 0.79-1.07; P = 0.279) infection as compared to women of normal WC (≤88 cm). Meanwhile, neither obesity nor a high waist-to-height ratio (>0.6) showed statistical associations with any-type or HR-type HPV infections (Table 2).Fig. 1


Excessive adiposity, metabolic health, and risks for genital human papillomavirus infection in adult women: a population-based cross-sectional study.

Liu SH, Chen HJ, Hsieh TH, Chen JC, Huang YC - BMC Obes (2015)

Age-specific prevalence of central obesity, obesity, any-type HPV and high risk (HR) type HPV in adult women enrolled in NHANES 2003–2010. Weighted prevalence estimates for women with central obesity, obesity, positive HPV DNA testing for any type or high-risk (or, oncogenic) types were displayed on the same graph. These single-year estimates for each age group were averages across the four survey cycles, despite of some variations, showing a generally increasing (for excessive adiposity) or decreasing trend (for HPV infection) towards older age. While these age-associated variations in central obesity and obesity parallel with each other, any-type and HR-type HPV prevalence became discordant around ages 40–44 years, at which time there was an apparent dip in HR-HPV prevalence
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591625&req=5

Fig1: Age-specific prevalence of central obesity, obesity, any-type HPV and high risk (HR) type HPV in adult women enrolled in NHANES 2003–2010. Weighted prevalence estimates for women with central obesity, obesity, positive HPV DNA testing for any type or high-risk (or, oncogenic) types were displayed on the same graph. These single-year estimates for each age group were averages across the four survey cycles, despite of some variations, showing a generally increasing (for excessive adiposity) or decreasing trend (for HPV infection) towards older age. While these age-associated variations in central obesity and obesity parallel with each other, any-type and HR-type HPV prevalence became discordant around ages 40–44 years, at which time there was an apparent dip in HR-HPV prevalence
Mentions: Women with central obesity had a slightly reduced (any-type: 41.1 % vs. 44.9 %, P = 0.045) or comparable (HR-type: 21.9 % vs. 25.4 %, P = 0.055) HPV prevalence. BMI-based adiposity measures, such as obesity (P = 0.451 for any-HPV; P = 0.191 for HR-HPV) and BMI categories (P = 0.36 for any-HPV; P = 0.345 for HR-HPV), were not associated with HPV prevalence (Table 1). Except for a diabetic history and current use of oral contraceptives, women who were positive for any-type and HR-type HPV DNA testing were likely to be young (Fig. 1) and shared common socio-demographic and behavioral risk factors (all P-values <0.001, Table 1). After adjusting for age, socio-economic factors and risky behaviors, centrally-obese women had a 9 % reduced prevalence for any-HPV (aPR = 0.91, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.84–0.99; P = 0.03) but not for HR-HPV (aPR = 0.92, 95 % CI = 0.79-1.07; P = 0.279) infection as compared to women of normal WC (≤88 cm). Meanwhile, neither obesity nor a high waist-to-height ratio (>0.6) showed statistical associations with any-type or HR-type HPV infections (Table 2).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In contrary to findings for the general population, HR-HPV prevalence was decreased in a subgroup of women with obesity or central obesity.Possible explanations for such heterogeneity included less risky sexual behaviors, an altered immune milieu that promoted viral clearance, and increased access to healthcare resources due to other obesity-related co-morbidities in this subpopulation.Obesity or central obesity was not significantly associated with prevalent any-type or HR-type HPV infection among adult women in general.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Wen Hwa 1st Rd., Gueishan District, Taoyuan City, 333 Taiwan ; Department of Family Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, 5 Fuhsin Street, Gueishan District, Taoyuan City, 333 Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The role of excessive adiposity or its metabolic consequences in persistent HPV infection among general adult women remains unknown.

Methods: Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2003-2010, we compared adult women's likelihood for any- or high-risk (HR) type HPV infection by degrees of excessive adiposity and metabolic health status.

Results: Any-type (41.1 % vs. 44.9 %, P = 0.045) or HR-type HPV prevalence (21.9 % vs. 25.4 %, P = 0.055) was comparable in women aged 20-59 years with or without central obesity. After adjusting for age, socioeconomic indicators, and lifetime sexual risks, centrally-obese women barely showed a different likelihood for any-type (aPR [adjusted prevalence ratio] = 0.91, P = 0.03) or HR-HPV infection (aPR = 0.92, P = 0.279). However, obesity (aPR = 0.76, P = 0.017) or centrally-obesity (aPR = 0.72, P = 0.003) was negatively correlated with HR-HPV infection in women reporting an early sex debut (<16 years; P for interaction <0.05). In the fasting subpopulation, obesity (aPR = 0.77, P = 0.016) or metabolically unhealthy obesity (aPR = 0.69, P = 0.018) was significantly correlated with a 23 % or 31 % reduced prevalence of HR-HPV infection.

Discussion: In contrary to findings for the general population, HR-HPV prevalence was decreased in a subgroup of women with obesity or central obesity. Possible explanations for such heterogeneity included less risky sexual behaviors, an altered immune milieu that promoted viral clearance, and increased access to healthcare resources due to other obesity-related co-morbidities in this subpopulation.

Conclusions: Obesity or central obesity was not significantly associated with prevalent any-type or HR-type HPV infection among adult women in general. However, in certain subpopulations, excessive adiposity or its relevant metabolic dysfunction was negatively associated with HR-HPV infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus