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Richness, systematics, and distribution of molluscs associated with the macroalga Gigartina skottsbergii in the Strait of Magellan, Chile: A biogeographic affinity study.

Rosenfeld S, Aldea C, Mansilla A, Marambio J, Ojeda J - Zookeys (2015)

Bottom Line: The species richness recorded represents a value above the average richness of those reported in studies carried out in the last 40 years in sublittoral bottoms of the Strait of Magellan.The biogeographic affinity indicates that the majority of those species (38%) present an endemic Magellanic distribution, while the rest have a wide distribution in the Magellanic-Pacific, Magellanic-Atlantic, and Magellanic-Southern Ocean.The molluscs from the Magellan Region serve as study models for biogeographic relationships that can explain long-reaching patterns and are meaningful in evaluating possible ecosystemic changes generated by natural causes or related to human activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratorio de Macroalgas Antárticas y Subantárticas, Universidad de Magallanes, Casilla 113-D, Punta Arenas, Chile ; Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad (IEB), Santiago.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge about the marine malacofauna in the Magellan Region has been gained from many scientific expeditions that were carried out during the 19th century. However, despite the information that exists about molluscs in the Magellan Region, there is a lack of studies about assemblages of molluscs co-occurring with macroalgae, especially commercially exploitable algae such as Gigartina skottsbergii, a species that currently represents the largest portion of carrageenans within the Chilean industry. The objective of this study is to inform about the richness, systematics, and distribution of the species of molluscs associated with natural beds in the Strait of Magellan. A total of 120 samples from quadrates of 0.25 m(2) were obtained by SCUBA diving at two sites within the Strait of Magellan. Sampling occurred seasonally between autumn 2010 and summer 2011: 15 quadrates were collected at each site and season. A total of 852 individuals, corresponding to 42 species of molluscs belonging to Polyplacophora (9 species), Gastropoda (24), and Bivalvia (9), were identified. The species richness recorded represents a value above the average richness of those reported in studies carried out in the last 40 years in sublittoral bottoms of the Strait of Magellan. The biogeographic affinity indicates that the majority of those species (38%) present an endemic Magellanic distribution, while the rest have a wide distribution in the Magellanic-Pacific, Magellanic-Atlantic, and Magellanic-Southern Ocean. The molluscs from the Magellan Region serve as study models for biogeographic relationships that can explain long-reaching patterns and are meaningful in evaluating possible ecosystemic changes generated by natural causes or related to human activities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

APareuthriacerealis (6 × 3 mm) BPareuthriaplumbea (25 × 12 mm) CPareuthriapaessleri (7 × 4 mm) DPareuthriajanseni (10 × 14 mm) ETrophongerversianus (53 × 38 mm) FFuegotrophonpallidus (18 × 9 mm) GXymenopsismuriciformis (32 × 17 mm) HActeonbiplicatus (5 × 3 mm).
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Figure 6: APareuthriacerealis (6 × 3 mm) BPareuthriaplumbea (25 × 12 mm) CPareuthriapaessleri (7 × 4 mm) DPareuthriajanseni (10 × 14 mm) ETrophongerversianus (53 × 38 mm) FFuegotrophonpallidus (18 × 9 mm) GXymenopsismuriciformis (32 × 17 mm) HActeonbiplicatus (5 × 3 mm).

Mentions: Fig. 6A


Richness, systematics, and distribution of molluscs associated with the macroalga Gigartina skottsbergii in the Strait of Magellan, Chile: A biogeographic affinity study.

Rosenfeld S, Aldea C, Mansilla A, Marambio J, Ojeda J - Zookeys (2015)

APareuthriacerealis (6 × 3 mm) BPareuthriaplumbea (25 × 12 mm) CPareuthriapaessleri (7 × 4 mm) DPareuthriajanseni (10 × 14 mm) ETrophongerversianus (53 × 38 mm) FFuegotrophonpallidus (18 × 9 mm) GXymenopsismuriciformis (32 × 17 mm) HActeonbiplicatus (5 × 3 mm).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591604&req=5

Figure 6: APareuthriacerealis (6 × 3 mm) BPareuthriaplumbea (25 × 12 mm) CPareuthriapaessleri (7 × 4 mm) DPareuthriajanseni (10 × 14 mm) ETrophongerversianus (53 × 38 mm) FFuegotrophonpallidus (18 × 9 mm) GXymenopsismuriciformis (32 × 17 mm) HActeonbiplicatus (5 × 3 mm).
Mentions: Fig. 6A

Bottom Line: The species richness recorded represents a value above the average richness of those reported in studies carried out in the last 40 years in sublittoral bottoms of the Strait of Magellan.The biogeographic affinity indicates that the majority of those species (38%) present an endemic Magellanic distribution, while the rest have a wide distribution in the Magellanic-Pacific, Magellanic-Atlantic, and Magellanic-Southern Ocean.The molluscs from the Magellan Region serve as study models for biogeographic relationships that can explain long-reaching patterns and are meaningful in evaluating possible ecosystemic changes generated by natural causes or related to human activities.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratorio de Macroalgas Antárticas y Subantárticas, Universidad de Magallanes, Casilla 113-D, Punta Arenas, Chile ; Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad (IEB), Santiago.

ABSTRACT
Knowledge about the marine malacofauna in the Magellan Region has been gained from many scientific expeditions that were carried out during the 19th century. However, despite the information that exists about molluscs in the Magellan Region, there is a lack of studies about assemblages of molluscs co-occurring with macroalgae, especially commercially exploitable algae such as Gigartina skottsbergii, a species that currently represents the largest portion of carrageenans within the Chilean industry. The objective of this study is to inform about the richness, systematics, and distribution of the species of molluscs associated with natural beds in the Strait of Magellan. A total of 120 samples from quadrates of 0.25 m(2) were obtained by SCUBA diving at two sites within the Strait of Magellan. Sampling occurred seasonally between autumn 2010 and summer 2011: 15 quadrates were collected at each site and season. A total of 852 individuals, corresponding to 42 species of molluscs belonging to Polyplacophora (9 species), Gastropoda (24), and Bivalvia (9), were identified. The species richness recorded represents a value above the average richness of those reported in studies carried out in the last 40 years in sublittoral bottoms of the Strait of Magellan. The biogeographic affinity indicates that the majority of those species (38%) present an endemic Magellanic distribution, while the rest have a wide distribution in the Magellanic-Pacific, Magellanic-Atlantic, and Magellanic-Southern Ocean. The molluscs from the Magellan Region serve as study models for biogeographic relationships that can explain long-reaching patterns and are meaningful in evaluating possible ecosystemic changes generated by natural causes or related to human activities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus