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Probiotic and anti-inflammatory attributes of an isolate Lactobacillus helveticus NS8 from Mongolian fermented koumiss.

Rong J, Zheng H, Liu M, Hu X, Wang T, Zhang X, Jin F, Wang L - BMC Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: NS8 was found to be rather protective against TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid)-induced murine colitis.Furthermore, NS8 was also able to diminish the proinflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 by inducing higher levels of IL-10.In summary, L. helveticus NS8 exhibited good probiotic and particularly immunomodulatory properties, with a potential for development of functional food commercially or therapeutic adjuvant for inflammatory diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, China. jjrong@hznu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: Koumiss is a traditionally fermented mare's milk described with health-promoting potentials for decades. However, only a few studies focused on the probiotic strains isolated from koumiss. In this study, we collected koumiss samples from Inner Mongolian pasturing area of China and selected a promising strain of Lactobacillus helveticus, isolate NS8, based on the survival abilities in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and adhesion to intestinal endothelial cells in vitro. As the ability to positively modulate host immune response is a feature of increasing importance in measuring the probiotic potential of a bacterial strain, our study mainly focus on the immunomodulatory properties of L. helveticus NS8 by using in vivo and ex vivo analyses.

Results: L. helveticus NS8 was identified by molecular-typing methods, both at genus and species levels. As a typical food niche-specific bacteria, NS8 showed a moderate survival ability in GIT environment in vitro. However, an excellent binding capacity to the human intestinal epithelial cells, along with significant autoaggregation and cell-surface hydrophobicity was observed. Additionally, the presence of S-layer protein was responsible for the cell surface properties of this strain. NS8 was found to be rather protective against TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid)-induced murine colitis. In the meantime, co-culture with NS8 induced an increased level of secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in peripheral blood mono-nuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, NS8 was also able to diminish the proinflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 by inducing higher levels of IL-10. Specially, adding of the purified S-layer protein didn't influence the production of IL-10. The specific ligand-host receptor interactions on the NS8 specific immune responses need to be learned further.

Conclusion: In summary, L. helveticus NS8 exhibited good probiotic and particularly immunomodulatory properties, with a potential for development of functional food commercially or therapeutic adjuvant for inflammatory diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anti-inflammatory effect of L. helveticus NS8 on acute colitis induced in BALB/c mice by intrarectal administration of TNBS. a. Weight variation between day 5 (TNBS administration) and day 7 (death). b. Wallace inflammation scores. Results are means ± SEM of one representative experiment (ten mice per group). Significant P < 0.05 (*), as compared with the TNBS control group. c. Histological sections of colonic tissues of BALB/c mice. Left, blank control group receiving ethanol 50 %; Middle, TNBS-treated group receiving no NS8; Right, TNBS-treated mice gavaged with NS8. Magnification, ×100
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Fig3: Anti-inflammatory effect of L. helveticus NS8 on acute colitis induced in BALB/c mice by intrarectal administration of TNBS. a. Weight variation between day 5 (TNBS administration) and day 7 (death). b. Wallace inflammation scores. Results are means ± SEM of one representative experiment (ten mice per group). Significant P < 0.05 (*), as compared with the TNBS control group. c. Histological sections of colonic tissues of BALB/c mice. Left, blank control group receiving ethanol 50 %; Middle, TNBS-treated group receiving no NS8; Right, TNBS-treated mice gavaged with NS8. Magnification, ×100

Mentions: To evaluate the immunomodulatory potential of NS8, we compared the development of TNBS-induced colitis in mice that were treated, or not, with NS8. We observed that weight loss was significantly reduced in mice receiving NS8 (12.1 %) as compared with mice not received bacteria (16.7 %, Fig. 3a). Characteristic features of colitis were observed 2 days after administration of TNBS in the mice receiving no bacteria, leading to a Wallace score of 4.2 ± 0.8 (Fig. 3b), which corresponds to several areas of ulceration accompanied by intestinal wall thickening. Histological analysis performed on these mice revealed large areas of ulceration with inflammatory infiltrates (Fig. 3c). In contrast, mice that had received NS8 bacteria displayed significantly less severe lesions. Necrotic lesions were observed in only three mouse of ten, whereas the others suffered mildly from hyperemia and thickening of the intestinal wall, leading to a Wallace score of 2.6 ± 0.5 (Fig. 3b, c).Fig. 3


Probiotic and anti-inflammatory attributes of an isolate Lactobacillus helveticus NS8 from Mongolian fermented koumiss.

Rong J, Zheng H, Liu M, Hu X, Wang T, Zhang X, Jin F, Wang L - BMC Microbiol. (2015)

Anti-inflammatory effect of L. helveticus NS8 on acute colitis induced in BALB/c mice by intrarectal administration of TNBS. a. Weight variation between day 5 (TNBS administration) and day 7 (death). b. Wallace inflammation scores. Results are means ± SEM of one representative experiment (ten mice per group). Significant P < 0.05 (*), as compared with the TNBS control group. c. Histological sections of colonic tissues of BALB/c mice. Left, blank control group receiving ethanol 50 %; Middle, TNBS-treated group receiving no NS8; Right, TNBS-treated mice gavaged with NS8. Magnification, ×100
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591576&req=5

Fig3: Anti-inflammatory effect of L. helveticus NS8 on acute colitis induced in BALB/c mice by intrarectal administration of TNBS. a. Weight variation between day 5 (TNBS administration) and day 7 (death). b. Wallace inflammation scores. Results are means ± SEM of one representative experiment (ten mice per group). Significant P < 0.05 (*), as compared with the TNBS control group. c. Histological sections of colonic tissues of BALB/c mice. Left, blank control group receiving ethanol 50 %; Middle, TNBS-treated group receiving no NS8; Right, TNBS-treated mice gavaged with NS8. Magnification, ×100
Mentions: To evaluate the immunomodulatory potential of NS8, we compared the development of TNBS-induced colitis in mice that were treated, or not, with NS8. We observed that weight loss was significantly reduced in mice receiving NS8 (12.1 %) as compared with mice not received bacteria (16.7 %, Fig. 3a). Characteristic features of colitis were observed 2 days after administration of TNBS in the mice receiving no bacteria, leading to a Wallace score of 4.2 ± 0.8 (Fig. 3b), which corresponds to several areas of ulceration accompanied by intestinal wall thickening. Histological analysis performed on these mice revealed large areas of ulceration with inflammatory infiltrates (Fig. 3c). In contrast, mice that had received NS8 bacteria displayed significantly less severe lesions. Necrotic lesions were observed in only three mouse of ten, whereas the others suffered mildly from hyperemia and thickening of the intestinal wall, leading to a Wallace score of 2.6 ± 0.5 (Fig. 3b, c).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: NS8 was found to be rather protective against TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid)-induced murine colitis.Furthermore, NS8 was also able to diminish the proinflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 by inducing higher levels of IL-10.In summary, L. helveticus NS8 exhibited good probiotic and particularly immunomodulatory properties, with a potential for development of functional food commercially or therapeutic adjuvant for inflammatory diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, China. jjrong@hznu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: Koumiss is a traditionally fermented mare's milk described with health-promoting potentials for decades. However, only a few studies focused on the probiotic strains isolated from koumiss. In this study, we collected koumiss samples from Inner Mongolian pasturing area of China and selected a promising strain of Lactobacillus helveticus, isolate NS8, based on the survival abilities in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and adhesion to intestinal endothelial cells in vitro. As the ability to positively modulate host immune response is a feature of increasing importance in measuring the probiotic potential of a bacterial strain, our study mainly focus on the immunomodulatory properties of L. helveticus NS8 by using in vivo and ex vivo analyses.

Results: L. helveticus NS8 was identified by molecular-typing methods, both at genus and species levels. As a typical food niche-specific bacteria, NS8 showed a moderate survival ability in GIT environment in vitro. However, an excellent binding capacity to the human intestinal epithelial cells, along with significant autoaggregation and cell-surface hydrophobicity was observed. Additionally, the presence of S-layer protein was responsible for the cell surface properties of this strain. NS8 was found to be rather protective against TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid)-induced murine colitis. In the meantime, co-culture with NS8 induced an increased level of secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in peripheral blood mono-nuclear cells (PBMCs). Furthermore, NS8 was also able to diminish the proinflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 by inducing higher levels of IL-10. Specially, adding of the purified S-layer protein didn't influence the production of IL-10. The specific ligand-host receptor interactions on the NS8 specific immune responses need to be learned further.

Conclusion: In summary, L. helveticus NS8 exhibited good probiotic and particularly immunomodulatory properties, with a potential for development of functional food commercially or therapeutic adjuvant for inflammatory diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus