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Seasonality in physical activity and walking of healthy older adults.

Kimura T, Kobayashi H, Nakayama E, Kakihana W - J Physiol Anthropol (2015)

Bottom Line: Physical parameters and activities as well as the preferred speed of walking were measured at half-year intervals.The seasonal climatic environment of the geographic area of this study affected the activity level of the participants.These results indicate that seasonality should be considered when analyzing physical activity and walking in older adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan. tkimura@um.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: An increasing number of older adults require improvements in their quality of life. Physical activities, particularly walking ability, are of primary importance for older adults. The influence of season on physical activity has not been sufficiently studied among older adults. Therefore, this report compared the physical activity and walking of older individuals between summer and winter seasons using a longitudinal study design in a community in a mid-latitude area.

Methods: Participants in the study comprised 39 healthy community-dwelling adults ranging in age from 65 to 80 years. Physical parameters and activities as well as the preferred speed of walking were measured at half-year intervals.

Results: Significant seasonal differences from summer to winter and from winter to summer were detected. Specifically, body fat percentage, single-leg stance, walking speed, cadence, stride length, and trunk and head-trunk pitch ranges were greater in winter than in summer, whereas grip strength and steps per day were greater in summer. Temperature and total activity level were considered to be related to body fat percentage. Grip strength was thought to be affected by outdoor temperature. The possibility of relationships between increased activity per unit time in older adults and increased preferred walking speed, cadence, and stride length in winter temperatures was discussed.

Conclusion: The seasonal climatic environment of the geographic area of this study affected the activity level of the participants. These results indicate that seasonality should be considered when analyzing physical activity and walking in older adults.

No MeSH data available.


Examples of seasonal changes in the same individuals over three consecutive years. Left: steps per day; Right: body fat percentage (%). S summer, W winter, F female, M male. Values for the same individual are given using the same symbol to show seasonality. Steps per day and body fat percentage generally varied seasonally but in opposite directions
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Fig1: Examples of seasonal changes in the same individuals over three consecutive years. Left: steps per day; Right: body fat percentage (%). S summer, W winter, F female, M male. Values for the same individual are given using the same symbol to show seasonality. Steps per day and body fat percentage generally varied seasonally but in opposite directions

Mentions: As representative examples of seasonality, Fig. 1 shows 3 years of continuous measurements of steps per day and body fat percentage in the same individuals. Although some individual variations were seen, steps per day and body fat percentage generally increased and decreased seasonally but inversely.Fig. 1


Seasonality in physical activity and walking of healthy older adults.

Kimura T, Kobayashi H, Nakayama E, Kakihana W - J Physiol Anthropol (2015)

Examples of seasonal changes in the same individuals over three consecutive years. Left: steps per day; Right: body fat percentage (%). S summer, W winter, F female, M male. Values for the same individual are given using the same symbol to show seasonality. Steps per day and body fat percentage generally varied seasonally but in opposite directions
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591564&req=5

Fig1: Examples of seasonal changes in the same individuals over three consecutive years. Left: steps per day; Right: body fat percentage (%). S summer, W winter, F female, M male. Values for the same individual are given using the same symbol to show seasonality. Steps per day and body fat percentage generally varied seasonally but in opposite directions
Mentions: As representative examples of seasonality, Fig. 1 shows 3 years of continuous measurements of steps per day and body fat percentage in the same individuals. Although some individual variations were seen, steps per day and body fat percentage generally increased and decreased seasonally but inversely.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Physical parameters and activities as well as the preferred speed of walking were measured at half-year intervals.The seasonal climatic environment of the geographic area of this study affected the activity level of the participants.These results indicate that seasonality should be considered when analyzing physical activity and walking in older adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan. tkimura@um.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: An increasing number of older adults require improvements in their quality of life. Physical activities, particularly walking ability, are of primary importance for older adults. The influence of season on physical activity has not been sufficiently studied among older adults. Therefore, this report compared the physical activity and walking of older individuals between summer and winter seasons using a longitudinal study design in a community in a mid-latitude area.

Methods: Participants in the study comprised 39 healthy community-dwelling adults ranging in age from 65 to 80 years. Physical parameters and activities as well as the preferred speed of walking were measured at half-year intervals.

Results: Significant seasonal differences from summer to winter and from winter to summer were detected. Specifically, body fat percentage, single-leg stance, walking speed, cadence, stride length, and trunk and head-trunk pitch ranges were greater in winter than in summer, whereas grip strength and steps per day were greater in summer. Temperature and total activity level were considered to be related to body fat percentage. Grip strength was thought to be affected by outdoor temperature. The possibility of relationships between increased activity per unit time in older adults and increased preferred walking speed, cadence, and stride length in winter temperatures was discussed.

Conclusion: The seasonal climatic environment of the geographic area of this study affected the activity level of the participants. These results indicate that seasonality should be considered when analyzing physical activity and walking in older adults.

No MeSH data available.