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Man, You Might Look Like a Woman-If a Child Is Next to You.

Brielmann AA, Gaetano J, Stolarova M - Adv Cogn Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: If such social contextual information was provided in the first rather than the second block of the experiment, subsequent female gender attributions increased for adult figures shown alone.Additionally, female gender attributions for actively helping relative to passive adults were made more often.Thus, we provide strong evidence that gender categorization can be altered by social context even if the subject of gender categorization remains identical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Zukunftskolleg, University of Konstanz, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Gender categorization seems prone to a pervasive bias: Persons about whom or ambiguous gender information is available are more often considered male than female. Our study assessed whether such a male-bias is present in non-binary choice tasks and whether it can be altered by social contextual information. Participants were asked to report their perception of an adult figure's gender in three context conditions: (1) alone, (2) passively besides a child, or (3) actively helping a child (n = 10 pictures each). The response options male, female and I don't know were provided. As a result, participants attributed male gender to most figures and rarely used the I don't know option in all conditions, but were more likely to attribute female gender to the same adult figure if it was shown with a child. If such social contextual information was provided in the first rather than the second block of the experiment, subsequent female gender attributions increased for adult figures shown alone. Additionally, female gender attributions for actively helping relative to passive adults were made more often. Thus, we provide strong evidence that gender categorization can be altered by social context even if the subject of gender categorization remains identical.

No MeSH data available.


Stimuli for the three different conditions for one example situation.Pictures were generated in order to ensure maximum similaritybetween conditions. Arrows’ labels describe changes made forgenerating pictures with differing social context. Dashed framesgroup context conditions according to blocks within which pictureswere randomized.
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Figure 1: Stimuli for the three different conditions for one example situation.Pictures were generated in order to ensure maximum similaritybetween conditions. Arrows’ labels describe changes made forgenerating pictures with differing social context. Dashed framesgroup context conditions according to blocks within which pictureswere randomized.

Mentions: An extension of the NeoHelp Stimulus Set (Brielmann & Stolarova, 2014a) was employed. All stimuli wereblack-and-white comic drawings of adults in everyday situations (800 ×800 px). The adult figures were drawn without explicit male or female gendercues: Each had a short haircut, average non-curvy figure, and wore widepants and t-shirt. A total of ten different situations were shown (e.g., anadult kneeling next to a table and chair). Three variations of eachsituation were derived, adult alone, socialpassive, and social helping, resulting in atotal of 30 stimuli. The adult alone condition provided nosocial context information and served as a baseline measure. In thesocial passive condition, the adult figure was shownnext to a child who acted without assistance—for example, grabbing aball on a table. In the social helping condition the adultwas depicted actively helping the child to reach a goal—for example,pushing a faraway ball towards the child. Slight body posture changes werenecessary to convey the differences between social passive and socialhelping conditions, otherwise the adult figures were identical across allconditions. Figure 1 shows pictures forall three conditions for one example situation. The complete stimulus set isavailable at https://osf.io/ijk8w.


Man, You Might Look Like a Woman-If a Child Is Next to You.

Brielmann AA, Gaetano J, Stolarova M - Adv Cogn Psychol (2015)

Stimuli for the three different conditions for one example situation.Pictures were generated in order to ensure maximum similaritybetween conditions. Arrows’ labels describe changes made forgenerating pictures with differing social context. Dashed framesgroup context conditions according to blocks within which pictureswere randomized.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591517&req=5

Figure 1: Stimuli for the three different conditions for one example situation.Pictures were generated in order to ensure maximum similaritybetween conditions. Arrows’ labels describe changes made forgenerating pictures with differing social context. Dashed framesgroup context conditions according to blocks within which pictureswere randomized.
Mentions: An extension of the NeoHelp Stimulus Set (Brielmann & Stolarova, 2014a) was employed. All stimuli wereblack-and-white comic drawings of adults in everyday situations (800 ×800 px). The adult figures were drawn without explicit male or female gendercues: Each had a short haircut, average non-curvy figure, and wore widepants and t-shirt. A total of ten different situations were shown (e.g., anadult kneeling next to a table and chair). Three variations of eachsituation were derived, adult alone, socialpassive, and social helping, resulting in atotal of 30 stimuli. The adult alone condition provided nosocial context information and served as a baseline measure. In thesocial passive condition, the adult figure was shownnext to a child who acted without assistance—for example, grabbing aball on a table. In the social helping condition the adultwas depicted actively helping the child to reach a goal—for example,pushing a faraway ball towards the child. Slight body posture changes werenecessary to convey the differences between social passive and socialhelping conditions, otherwise the adult figures were identical across allconditions. Figure 1 shows pictures forall three conditions for one example situation. The complete stimulus set isavailable at https://osf.io/ijk8w.

Bottom Line: If such social contextual information was provided in the first rather than the second block of the experiment, subsequent female gender attributions increased for adult figures shown alone.Additionally, female gender attributions for actively helping relative to passive adults were made more often.Thus, we provide strong evidence that gender categorization can be altered by social context even if the subject of gender categorization remains identical.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology and Zukunftskolleg, University of Konstanz, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Gender categorization seems prone to a pervasive bias: Persons about whom or ambiguous gender information is available are more often considered male than female. Our study assessed whether such a male-bias is present in non-binary choice tasks and whether it can be altered by social contextual information. Participants were asked to report their perception of an adult figure's gender in three context conditions: (1) alone, (2) passively besides a child, or (3) actively helping a child (n = 10 pictures each). The response options male, female and I don't know were provided. As a result, participants attributed male gender to most figures and rarely used the I don't know option in all conditions, but were more likely to attribute female gender to the same adult figure if it was shown with a child. If such social contextual information was provided in the first rather than the second block of the experiment, subsequent female gender attributions increased for adult figures shown alone. Additionally, female gender attributions for actively helping relative to passive adults were made more often. Thus, we provide strong evidence that gender categorization can be altered by social context even if the subject of gender categorization remains identical.

No MeSH data available.