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Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar.

Kristensen T, Næsset E, Ohlson M, Bolstad PV, Kolka R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants.Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models.Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.

ABSTRACT
A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of study area.Location of the study plots in a boreal forest landscape in SE Norway. Plots labeled with K are located close to the small lake Kapteinstjern, and plots labeled with A are located SW of the lake Årumsvannet. Reprinted from Kartverket under a CC BY license, with permission from Kartverket, original copyright Kartverket 2013.
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pone.0138450.g001: Map of study area.Location of the study plots in a boreal forest landscape in SE Norway. Plots labeled with K are located close to the small lake Kapteinstjern, and plots labeled with A are located SW of the lake Årumsvannet. Reprinted from Kartverket under a CC BY license, with permission from Kartverket, original copyright Kartverket 2013.

Mentions: Eight circular study plots with a 50 m diameter (~2000 m2) were positioned in mature and multilayered spruce forests in the Årum–Kapteinstjern area, located approximately 35 km north of Skien in SE Norway (Fig 1). Six of the eight plots were selected randomly, i.e. four were positioned by random in the forest landscape SW of the lake Årumvannet, and two were randomly positioned adjacent to the forest landscape near Lake Kapteinstjern (Table 1). Here, were also two plots located subjectively to cover the occurrence of the red-listed lichen Usnea longissima [44]. The area is considered situated in the border of the south–middle boreal vegetation zone [45]. Climate is oceanic [45], with an annual mean temperature approx. 3.3°C, and average extreme temperatures 14.5°C in July and -7°C in January. Annual precipitation averages 1120 mm, with a high of 115 mm in July, and a low of 60 mm in February. The forests belong to the Picea—Vaccinum myrtillus type [46, 47], which are the most abundant forest type in NW Europe. The forests are dominated by Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten), but scattered occurrences of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and birch (Betula pendula Roth and B.pubescens Ehrh.) are common.


Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar.

Kristensen T, Næsset E, Ohlson M, Bolstad PV, Kolka R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Map of study area.Location of the study plots in a boreal forest landscape in SE Norway. Plots labeled with K are located close to the small lake Kapteinstjern, and plots labeled with A are located SW of the lake Årumsvannet. Reprinted from Kartverket under a CC BY license, with permission from Kartverket, original copyright Kartverket 2013.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591287&req=5

pone.0138450.g001: Map of study area.Location of the study plots in a boreal forest landscape in SE Norway. Plots labeled with K are located close to the small lake Kapteinstjern, and plots labeled with A are located SW of the lake Årumsvannet. Reprinted from Kartverket under a CC BY license, with permission from Kartverket, original copyright Kartverket 2013.
Mentions: Eight circular study plots with a 50 m diameter (~2000 m2) were positioned in mature and multilayered spruce forests in the Årum–Kapteinstjern area, located approximately 35 km north of Skien in SE Norway (Fig 1). Six of the eight plots were selected randomly, i.e. four were positioned by random in the forest landscape SW of the lake Årumvannet, and two were randomly positioned adjacent to the forest landscape near Lake Kapteinstjern (Table 1). Here, were also two plots located subjectively to cover the occurrence of the red-listed lichen Usnea longissima [44]. The area is considered situated in the border of the south–middle boreal vegetation zone [45]. Climate is oceanic [45], with an annual mean temperature approx. 3.3°C, and average extreme temperatures 14.5°C in July and -7°C in January. Annual precipitation averages 1120 mm, with a high of 115 mm in July, and a low of 60 mm in February. The forests belong to the Picea—Vaccinum myrtillus type [46, 47], which are the most abundant forest type in NW Europe. The forests are dominated by Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten), but scattered occurrences of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and birch (Betula pendula Roth and B.pubescens Ehrh.) are common.

Bottom Line: We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants.Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models.Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.

ABSTRACT
A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus