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Hydroclimatic changes and drivers in the Sava River Catchment and comparison with Swedish catchments.

Levi L, Jaramillo F, Andričević R, Destouni G - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers.Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments.Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering (SEED), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 76, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden. llevi@kth.se.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we investigate long-term hydroclimatic changes and their possible relation to regional changes in climate, land-use and water-use over the twentieth century in the transboundary Sava River Catchment (SRC) in South Eastern Europe. In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers. Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments. Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations. This provides a useful basis for further assessment of possible future hydroclimatic changes, under different scenarios of climate change and land/water-use developments in the region.

No MeSH data available.


Twenty-year moving averages of developed annual hydropower production per unit catchment area, water surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs for the SRC catchments. a Slavonski Brod. b Kozluk
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Fig4: Twenty-year moving averages of developed annual hydropower production per unit catchment area, water surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs for the SRC catchments. a Slavonski Brod. b Kozluk

Mentions: Furthermore, no sustained change in land-use is evident (Fig. S2, Supplementary Material) in any of the two subcatchments. However, the two catchments differ considerably in terms of their developed hydropower production capacity per catchment area (Figs. 3, 4), as well as their surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs (Fig. 4). Slavonski Brod with catchment area of 54 718 km2 has developed normal annual hydropower production of 25 MWh km−2, while the corresponding value for Kozluk with a 17 847 km2 area is 347 MWh km−2 (Tables S2, S3). The Kozluk catchment also exhibits a decrease in its CV(R) level from around the year 1960 (Fig. 3b), concurrently with the shift of AETwb/P to its higher level in this catchment. Around the same time, the Slavonski Brod catchment (Fig. 3a), after a few years of decrease, exhibits instead an increase in CV(R).Fig. 4


Hydroclimatic changes and drivers in the Sava River Catchment and comparison with Swedish catchments.

Levi L, Jaramillo F, Andričević R, Destouni G - Ambio (2015)

Twenty-year moving averages of developed annual hydropower production per unit catchment area, water surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs for the SRC catchments. a Slavonski Brod. b Kozluk
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591234&req=5

Fig4: Twenty-year moving averages of developed annual hydropower production per unit catchment area, water surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs for the SRC catchments. a Slavonski Brod. b Kozluk
Mentions: Furthermore, no sustained change in land-use is evident (Fig. S2, Supplementary Material) in any of the two subcatchments. However, the two catchments differ considerably in terms of their developed hydropower production capacity per catchment area (Figs. 3, 4), as well as their surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs (Fig. 4). Slavonski Brod with catchment area of 54 718 km2 has developed normal annual hydropower production of 25 MWh km−2, while the corresponding value for Kozluk with a 17 847 km2 area is 347 MWh km−2 (Tables S2, S3). The Kozluk catchment also exhibits a decrease in its CV(R) level from around the year 1960 (Fig. 3b), concurrently with the shift of AETwb/P to its higher level in this catchment. Around the same time, the Slavonski Brod catchment (Fig. 3a), after a few years of decrease, exhibits instead an increase in CV(R).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers.Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments.Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering (SEED), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 76, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden. llevi@kth.se.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we investigate long-term hydroclimatic changes and their possible relation to regional changes in climate, land-use and water-use over the twentieth century in the transboundary Sava River Catchment (SRC) in South Eastern Europe. In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers. Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments. Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations. This provides a useful basis for further assessment of possible future hydroclimatic changes, under different scenarios of climate change and land/water-use developments in the region.

No MeSH data available.