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Hydroclimatic changes and drivers in the Sava River Catchment and comparison with Swedish catchments.

Levi L, Jaramillo F, Andričević R, Destouni G - Ambio (2015)

Bottom Line: In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers.Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments.Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering (SEED), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 76, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden. llevi@kth.se.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we investigate long-term hydroclimatic changes and their possible relation to regional changes in climate, land-use and water-use over the twentieth century in the transboundary Sava River Catchment (SRC) in South Eastern Europe. In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers. Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments. Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations. This provides a useful basis for further assessment of possible future hydroclimatic changes, under different scenarios of climate change and land/water-use developments in the region.

No MeSH data available.


Change and variable co-development within the Sava River Catchment over the twentieth century. a Temperature (T), precipitation (P) and runoff (R). b Annual average actual evapotranspiration (AETwb) and relative actual evapotranspiration (AETwb/P); results are shown as 20-year moving averages, with AETwb calculated from catchment water balance, and AETTclim and AETBclim calculated from Turc and Budyko Eqs. (2) and (3), respectively; the AETTclim and AETBclim values shown have been scaled by the ratio of average AETwb in 1931–1993 and corresponding average AETTclim and AETBclim, respectively. c Total area coverage by different land uses. d 20-year moving averages of developed annual hydropower production per unit catchment area, water surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs for the SRC catchment
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Fig2: Change and variable co-development within the Sava River Catchment over the twentieth century. a Temperature (T), precipitation (P) and runoff (R). b Annual average actual evapotranspiration (AETwb) and relative actual evapotranspiration (AETwb/P); results are shown as 20-year moving averages, with AETwb calculated from catchment water balance, and AETTclim and AETBclim calculated from Turc and Budyko Eqs. (2) and (3), respectively; the AETTclim and AETBclim values shown have been scaled by the ratio of average AETwb in 1931–1993 and corresponding average AETTclim and AETBclim, respectively. c Total area coverage by different land uses. d 20-year moving averages of developed annual hydropower production per unit catchment area, water surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs for the SRC catchment

Mentions: Figure 2a shows the variability and change in annual and running 20-year annual average of T, P, and R for most of the twentieth century in the SRC. Whereas T has increased, P and R have decreased. With regard to AETwb, which for any given P conditions also affects R (Eq. (1)), Fig. 2b shows the whole AETwb time series in comparison with the purely climate-driven AETTclim and AETBclim estimates. A notable increase in AETwb can be seen starting sometime around 1950–1960, with AETwb thereafter remaining at a higher overall level, even though still fluctuating around that level. No corresponding sustained increase can be seen in the purely climate-related AETBclim and AETTclim estimates, or in the T data (Fig. 2a).Fig. 2


Hydroclimatic changes and drivers in the Sava River Catchment and comparison with Swedish catchments.

Levi L, Jaramillo F, Andričević R, Destouni G - Ambio (2015)

Change and variable co-development within the Sava River Catchment over the twentieth century. a Temperature (T), precipitation (P) and runoff (R). b Annual average actual evapotranspiration (AETwb) and relative actual evapotranspiration (AETwb/P); results are shown as 20-year moving averages, with AETwb calculated from catchment water balance, and AETTclim and AETBclim calculated from Turc and Budyko Eqs. (2) and (3), respectively; the AETTclim and AETBclim values shown have been scaled by the ratio of average AETwb in 1931–1993 and corresponding average AETTclim and AETBclim, respectively. c Total area coverage by different land uses. d 20-year moving averages of developed annual hydropower production per unit catchment area, water surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs for the SRC catchment
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig2: Change and variable co-development within the Sava River Catchment over the twentieth century. a Temperature (T), precipitation (P) and runoff (R). b Annual average actual evapotranspiration (AETwb) and relative actual evapotranspiration (AETwb/P); results are shown as 20-year moving averages, with AETwb calculated from catchment water balance, and AETTclim and AETBclim calculated from Turc and Budyko Eqs. (2) and (3), respectively; the AETTclim and AETBclim values shown have been scaled by the ratio of average AETwb in 1931–1993 and corresponding average AETTclim and AETBclim, respectively. c Total area coverage by different land uses. d 20-year moving averages of developed annual hydropower production per unit catchment area, water surface area and volume of man-made water reservoirs for the SRC catchment
Mentions: Figure 2a shows the variability and change in annual and running 20-year annual average of T, P, and R for most of the twentieth century in the SRC. Whereas T has increased, P and R have decreased. With regard to AETwb, which for any given P conditions also affects R (Eq. (1)), Fig. 2b shows the whole AETwb time series in comparison with the purely climate-driven AETTclim and AETBclim estimates. A notable increase in AETwb can be seen starting sometime around 1950–1960, with AETwb thereafter remaining at a higher overall level, even though still fluctuating around that level. No corresponding sustained increase can be seen in the purely climate-related AETBclim and AETTclim estimates, or in the T data (Fig. 2a).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers.Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments.Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sustainable Development, Environmental Science and Engineering (SEED), Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 76, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden. llevi@kth.se.

ABSTRACT
In this study, we investigate long-term hydroclimatic changes and their possible relation to regional changes in climate, land-use and water-use over the twentieth century in the transboundary Sava River Catchment (SRC) in South Eastern Europe. In a hydropower dominated part of the SRC, unlike in an unregulated part, we find increase in average annual evapotranspiration and decrease in temporal runoff variability, which are not readily explainable by observed concurrent climate change in temperature and precipitation and may be more related to landscape-internal change drivers. Among the latter investigated here, results indicate hydropower developments as most closely related to the found hydroclimatic shifts, consistent with previous such indications in studies of Swedish hydropower catchments. Overall, the present results have quantitatively framed the recent history and present state of hydroclimate in the SRC, of relevance for water resources in several countries and for a majority of their populations. This provides a useful basis for further assessment of possible future hydroclimatic changes, under different scenarios of climate change and land/water-use developments in the region.

No MeSH data available.