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Previous Exposure to Statin May Reduce the Risk of Subsequent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study.

Cho SF, Yang YH, Liu YC, Hsiao HH, Huang CT, Wu CH, Tsai YF, Wang HC, Liu TC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The analysis revealed that previous statin administration was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent NHL with an adjusted OR of 0.52 (95% CI, 0.43-0.62).The results of this study suggest that previous statin administration is associated with a lower risk of subsequent NHL.As statins are widely used medications, the magnitude of the risk reduction may have a substantial influence on public health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between previous exposure to statins and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

Methods: This nationwide population-based case-control study was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. The NHL group consisted of the patients with a first-time diagnosis of NHL between 2005 and 2008. The cases of the control group were pair-matched to the NHL group according to sex, year of birth and date of NHL diagnosis (index date). The statin administration data from both groups were retrospectively collected from the index date to January 1, 1996. The cumulative defined daily dose (cDDD) was estimated to evaluate the statin exposure. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariate logistic regression.

Results: The study population was composed of 1715 NHL patients and 16942 control subjects. The analysis revealed that previous statin administration was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent NHL with an adjusted OR of 0.52 (95% CI, 0.43-0.62). Additionally, there was a dose-response relationship between statin administration and the risk of NHL. The adjusted ORs were 0.63 (95% CI, 0.46-0.86), 0.58 (95% CI, 0.42-0.79), 0.51 (95% CI, 0.38-0.67), and 0.36 (95% CI, 0.24-0.53) for the subjects with statin administrations of fewer than 28, 28 to 90, 91 to 365, and more than 365 cDDDs, respectively, relative to the subjects without any statin administration.

Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that previous statin administration is associated with a lower risk of subsequent NHL. As statins are widely used medications, the magnitude of the risk reduction may have a substantial influence on public health. Further studies to confirm our findings are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart summarizing the data acquisition for the NHL and control groups.
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pone.0139289.g001: Flow chart summarizing the data acquisition for the NHL and control groups.

Mentions: Between 2005 and 2008, 2913 patients were diagnosed with NHL. After excluding the patients with previous malignancies and HIV infection, a total of 1715 patients with NHL were enrolled in this study. After matching for sex, year of birth and index date, we randomly selected 16,942 control subjects, approximated 91.95% as 10:1 matched with the NHL patients. The research design of this study is illustrated in Fig 1.


Previous Exposure to Statin May Reduce the Risk of Subsequent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study.

Cho SF, Yang YH, Liu YC, Hsiao HH, Huang CT, Wu CH, Tsai YF, Wang HC, Liu TC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow chart summarizing the data acquisition for the NHL and control groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591168&req=5

pone.0139289.g001: Flow chart summarizing the data acquisition for the NHL and control groups.
Mentions: Between 2005 and 2008, 2913 patients were diagnosed with NHL. After excluding the patients with previous malignancies and HIV infection, a total of 1715 patients with NHL were enrolled in this study. After matching for sex, year of birth and index date, we randomly selected 16,942 control subjects, approximated 91.95% as 10:1 matched with the NHL patients. The research design of this study is illustrated in Fig 1.

Bottom Line: The analysis revealed that previous statin administration was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent NHL with an adjusted OR of 0.52 (95% CI, 0.43-0.62).The results of this study suggest that previous statin administration is associated with a lower risk of subsequent NHL.As statins are widely used medications, the magnitude of the risk reduction may have a substantial influence on public health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between previous exposure to statins and the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL).

Methods: This nationwide population-based case-control study was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. The NHL group consisted of the patients with a first-time diagnosis of NHL between 2005 and 2008. The cases of the control group were pair-matched to the NHL group according to sex, year of birth and date of NHL diagnosis (index date). The statin administration data from both groups were retrospectively collected from the index date to January 1, 1996. The cumulative defined daily dose (cDDD) was estimated to evaluate the statin exposure. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariate logistic regression.

Results: The study population was composed of 1715 NHL patients and 16942 control subjects. The analysis revealed that previous statin administration was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent NHL with an adjusted OR of 0.52 (95% CI, 0.43-0.62). Additionally, there was a dose-response relationship between statin administration and the risk of NHL. The adjusted ORs were 0.63 (95% CI, 0.46-0.86), 0.58 (95% CI, 0.42-0.79), 0.51 (95% CI, 0.38-0.67), and 0.36 (95% CI, 0.24-0.53) for the subjects with statin administrations of fewer than 28, 28 to 90, 91 to 365, and more than 365 cDDDs, respectively, relative to the subjects without any statin administration.

Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that previous statin administration is associated with a lower risk of subsequent NHL. As statins are widely used medications, the magnitude of the risk reduction may have a substantial influence on public health. Further studies to confirm our findings are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus