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Ultrastructural study on the morphological changes in indigenous bacteria of mucous layer and chyme throughout the rat intestine.

Mantani Y, Ito E, Nishida M, Yuasa H, Masuda N, Qi WM, Kawano J, Yokoyama T, Hoshi N, Kitagawa H - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: The vacuoles were more frequently found in bacteria of ileal chyme than in those of ileal mucous layer and were found in a large majority of bacteria in both the mucous layer and chyme throughout the large intestine.Lysis or detachment of the cell wall in the indigenous bacteria was more frequently found in the large intestine than in the ileum, whereas bacterial remnants, such as cell walls, were distributed almost evenly throughout the intestine.In an experimental control of long-time-cultured Staphylococcus epidermidis on agar, similar vacuoles were also found, but cell-wall degeneration was never observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Histophysiology, Department of Bioresource Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 657-8501, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Indigenous bacteria in the alimentary tract are exposed to various bactericidal peptides and digestive enzymes, but the viability status and morphological changes of indigenous bacteria are unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to ultrastructurally clarify the degeneration and viability status of indigenous bacteria in the rat intestine. The majority of indigenous bacteria in the ileal mucous layer possessed intact cytoplasm, but the cytoplasm of a few bacteria contained vacuoles. The vacuoles were more frequently found in bacteria of ileal chyme than in those of ileal mucous layer and were found in a large majority of bacteria in both the mucous layer and chyme throughout the large intestine. In the dividing bacteria of the mucous layer and chyme throughout the intestine, the ratio of area occupied by vacuoles was almost always less than 10%. Lysis or detachment of the cell wall in the indigenous bacteria was more frequently found in the large intestine than in the ileum, whereas bacterial remnants, such as cell walls, were distributed almost evenly throughout the intestine. In an experimental control of long-time-cultured Staphylococcus epidermidis on agar, similar vacuoles were also found, but cell-wall degeneration was never observed. From these findings, indigenous bacteria in the mucous layer were ultrastructurally confirmed to be the source of indigenous bacteria in the chyme. Furthermore, the results suggested that indigenous bacteria were more severely degenerated toward the large intestine and were probably degraded in the intestine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Various morphological characteristics of indigenous bacteria: a) cell-dividingbacterium with septum (inter-arrows) in the cecal chyme, b) indigenous bacterium withlysis of the cell wall (arrow) in the cecal chyme, c) indigenous bacterium withdetachment of the cell wall from the cell membrane (arrowheads) in the chyme of theascending colon, d) indigenous bacterium with the endospore in its cytoplasm (arrow)in the mucous layer of the ascending colon, e) dead bacteria (arrows) in the cecalchyme. a, d, e) Bar=1 µm. b, c) Bar=500 nm.
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fig_003: Various morphological characteristics of indigenous bacteria: a) cell-dividingbacterium with septum (inter-arrows) in the cecal chyme, b) indigenous bacterium withlysis of the cell wall (arrow) in the cecal chyme, c) indigenous bacterium withdetachment of the cell wall from the cell membrane (arrowheads) in the chyme of theascending colon, d) indigenous bacterium with the endospore in its cytoplasm (arrow)in the mucous layer of the ascending colon, e) dead bacteria (arrows) in the cecalchyme. a, d, e) Bar=1 µm. b, c) Bar=500 nm.

Mentions: The indigenous bacteria in the mucous layer throughout the intestine occasionally showedcell divisions (Fig. 3aFig. 3.


Ultrastructural study on the morphological changes in indigenous bacteria of mucous layer and chyme throughout the rat intestine.

Mantani Y, Ito E, Nishida M, Yuasa H, Masuda N, Qi WM, Kawano J, Yokoyama T, Hoshi N, Kitagawa H - J. Vet. Med. Sci. (2015)

Various morphological characteristics of indigenous bacteria: a) cell-dividingbacterium with septum (inter-arrows) in the cecal chyme, b) indigenous bacterium withlysis of the cell wall (arrow) in the cecal chyme, c) indigenous bacterium withdetachment of the cell wall from the cell membrane (arrowheads) in the chyme of theascending colon, d) indigenous bacterium with the endospore in its cytoplasm (arrow)in the mucous layer of the ascending colon, e) dead bacteria (arrows) in the cecalchyme. a, d, e) Bar=1 µm. b, c) Bar=500 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591154&req=5

fig_003: Various morphological characteristics of indigenous bacteria: a) cell-dividingbacterium with septum (inter-arrows) in the cecal chyme, b) indigenous bacterium withlysis of the cell wall (arrow) in the cecal chyme, c) indigenous bacterium withdetachment of the cell wall from the cell membrane (arrowheads) in the chyme of theascending colon, d) indigenous bacterium with the endospore in its cytoplasm (arrow)in the mucous layer of the ascending colon, e) dead bacteria (arrows) in the cecalchyme. a, d, e) Bar=1 µm. b, c) Bar=500 nm.
Mentions: The indigenous bacteria in the mucous layer throughout the intestine occasionally showedcell divisions (Fig. 3aFig. 3.

Bottom Line: The vacuoles were more frequently found in bacteria of ileal chyme than in those of ileal mucous layer and were found in a large majority of bacteria in both the mucous layer and chyme throughout the large intestine.Lysis or detachment of the cell wall in the indigenous bacteria was more frequently found in the large intestine than in the ileum, whereas bacterial remnants, such as cell walls, were distributed almost evenly throughout the intestine.In an experimental control of long-time-cultured Staphylococcus epidermidis on agar, similar vacuoles were also found, but cell-wall degeneration was never observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Histophysiology, Department of Bioresource Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 657-8501, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Indigenous bacteria in the alimentary tract are exposed to various bactericidal peptides and digestive enzymes, but the viability status and morphological changes of indigenous bacteria are unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to ultrastructurally clarify the degeneration and viability status of indigenous bacteria in the rat intestine. The majority of indigenous bacteria in the ileal mucous layer possessed intact cytoplasm, but the cytoplasm of a few bacteria contained vacuoles. The vacuoles were more frequently found in bacteria of ileal chyme than in those of ileal mucous layer and were found in a large majority of bacteria in both the mucous layer and chyme throughout the large intestine. In the dividing bacteria of the mucous layer and chyme throughout the intestine, the ratio of area occupied by vacuoles was almost always less than 10%. Lysis or detachment of the cell wall in the indigenous bacteria was more frequently found in the large intestine than in the ileum, whereas bacterial remnants, such as cell walls, were distributed almost evenly throughout the intestine. In an experimental control of long-time-cultured Staphylococcus epidermidis on agar, similar vacuoles were also found, but cell-wall degeneration was never observed. From these findings, indigenous bacteria in the mucous layer were ultrastructurally confirmed to be the source of indigenous bacteria in the chyme. Furthermore, the results suggested that indigenous bacteria were more severely degenerated toward the large intestine and were probably degraded in the intestine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus