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Examining the Impact of a Public Health Message on Fish Consumption in Bermuda.

McLean Pirkle C, Peek-Ball C, Outerbridge E, Rouja PM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: No participant mentioned hearing about the benefits of fish consumption.Bermudian born women were less likely to reduce consumption of large fish species during pregnancy.Adjustment is needed to better balance the risk communication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of Public Health Studies. University of Hawai'i at Mãnoa. Honolulu, Hawai'i, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2003 mean cord blood mercury concentrations in pregnant Bermudian women exceeded levels associated with adverse health outcomes in children. The principal mercury source was local fish species. Public health messages were developed suggesting pregnant women reduce consumption of fish species with higher mercury concentrations (e.g. swordfish), substituting species containing lower mercury concentrations, and elevated omega-3 fatty acids (e.g. anchovies). Recent evidence indicates mercury concentrations in Bermuda's pregnant women have fallen five- fold.

Objectives: Assess whether changes in women's fish eating patterns during pregnancy are consistent with the public health messaging. Determine who is making changes to their diet during pregnancy and why.

Methods: Mixed methods study with a cross-sectional survey of 121 pregnant women, including 13 opened-ended interviews. Health system, social vulnerability, public health messaging, and socio-demographic variables were characterized and related to changes in fish consumption during pregnancy. Qualitative data were coded according to nutritional advice messages, comprehension of communication strategies, and sources of information.

Results: 95% of women surveyed encountered recommendations about fish consumption during pregnancy. 75% reported modifying fish eating behaviors because of recommendations. Principal sources of information about fish consumption in pregnancy were health care providers and the Internet. 71% of women reported reducing consumption of large fish species with greater mercury levels, but 60% reported reduced consumption of smaller, low mercury fish. No participant mentioned hearing about the benefits of fish consumption. More frequent exposure to public health messages during pregnancy was associated with lower reported consumption. Bermudian born women were less likely to reduce consumption of large fish species during pregnancy.

Conclusions: In Bermuda, public health messages advocating reduced consumption of larger, higher mercury-containing fish species appear effective, but masked the nutritional value message of small fish species, with low mercury concentration. Adjustment is needed to better balance the risk communication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reported changes in Fish Consumption During Pregnancy (n = 119)1,2.1. Data used to calculate these proportions come from the quantitative surveys. 2. On average, large fish contain more mercury and lower omega-3 and selenium concentrations than smaller fish, which are considered safer to eat.
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pone.0139459.g001: Reported changes in Fish Consumption During Pregnancy (n = 119)1,2.1. Data used to calculate these proportions come from the quantitative surveys. 2. On average, large fish contain more mercury and lower omega-3 and selenium concentrations than smaller fish, which are considered safer to eat.

Mentions: Fig 1 shows the changes that participants reported having made to their fish consumption during pregnancy. A third of women reported that they did not eat large, steak fish like swordfish, wahoo, and fresh tuna (36, 30%) and most women stated that they did not eat smaller fish like anchovies and sardines (74, 62%). Of those 83 women who ate larger fish, 59 (71%) reported eating less or a lot less fish large fish since becoming pregnant. Four women (5%) reported eating more or a lot more of the large fish. Of those 46 women who ate smaller fish, 22 (57%) reported consuming less or a lot less since becoming pregnant. Two women (4%) reported consuming more small fish since becoming pregnant.


Examining the Impact of a Public Health Message on Fish Consumption in Bermuda.

McLean Pirkle C, Peek-Ball C, Outerbridge E, Rouja PM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Reported changes in Fish Consumption During Pregnancy (n = 119)1,2.1. Data used to calculate these proportions come from the quantitative surveys. 2. On average, large fish contain more mercury and lower omega-3 and selenium concentrations than smaller fish, which are considered safer to eat.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591141&req=5

pone.0139459.g001: Reported changes in Fish Consumption During Pregnancy (n = 119)1,2.1. Data used to calculate these proportions come from the quantitative surveys. 2. On average, large fish contain more mercury and lower omega-3 and selenium concentrations than smaller fish, which are considered safer to eat.
Mentions: Fig 1 shows the changes that participants reported having made to their fish consumption during pregnancy. A third of women reported that they did not eat large, steak fish like swordfish, wahoo, and fresh tuna (36, 30%) and most women stated that they did not eat smaller fish like anchovies and sardines (74, 62%). Of those 83 women who ate larger fish, 59 (71%) reported eating less or a lot less fish large fish since becoming pregnant. Four women (5%) reported eating more or a lot more of the large fish. Of those 46 women who ate smaller fish, 22 (57%) reported consuming less or a lot less since becoming pregnant. Two women (4%) reported consuming more small fish since becoming pregnant.

Bottom Line: No participant mentioned hearing about the benefits of fish consumption.Bermudian born women were less likely to reduce consumption of large fish species during pregnancy.Adjustment is needed to better balance the risk communication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Office of Public Health Studies. University of Hawai'i at Mãnoa. Honolulu, Hawai'i, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: In 2003 mean cord blood mercury concentrations in pregnant Bermudian women exceeded levels associated with adverse health outcomes in children. The principal mercury source was local fish species. Public health messages were developed suggesting pregnant women reduce consumption of fish species with higher mercury concentrations (e.g. swordfish), substituting species containing lower mercury concentrations, and elevated omega-3 fatty acids (e.g. anchovies). Recent evidence indicates mercury concentrations in Bermuda's pregnant women have fallen five- fold.

Objectives: Assess whether changes in women's fish eating patterns during pregnancy are consistent with the public health messaging. Determine who is making changes to their diet during pregnancy and why.

Methods: Mixed methods study with a cross-sectional survey of 121 pregnant women, including 13 opened-ended interviews. Health system, social vulnerability, public health messaging, and socio-demographic variables were characterized and related to changes in fish consumption during pregnancy. Qualitative data were coded according to nutritional advice messages, comprehension of communication strategies, and sources of information.

Results: 95% of women surveyed encountered recommendations about fish consumption during pregnancy. 75% reported modifying fish eating behaviors because of recommendations. Principal sources of information about fish consumption in pregnancy were health care providers and the Internet. 71% of women reported reducing consumption of large fish species with greater mercury levels, but 60% reported reduced consumption of smaller, low mercury fish. No participant mentioned hearing about the benefits of fish consumption. More frequent exposure to public health messages during pregnancy was associated with lower reported consumption. Bermudian born women were less likely to reduce consumption of large fish species during pregnancy.

Conclusions: In Bermuda, public health messages advocating reduced consumption of larger, higher mercury-containing fish species appear effective, but masked the nutritional value message of small fish species, with low mercury concentration. Adjustment is needed to better balance the risk communication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus