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The extent and influence of Asbestos Safety Awareness training among managers who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings.

Hickey J, Saunders J, Davern P - Ind Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system.Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings.Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chemical & Environmental Sciences Department, University of Limerick, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
A telephone survey was conducted among a sample of managers (n=30) in Ireland who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings. The aims of the telephone survey were to examine the extent to which managers had completed Asbestos Safety Awareness (ASA) training, and to assess how such training might influence (i) their instinctive thoughts on asbestos, and (ii) their approach to aspects of asbestos management within their buildings. Managers' motivations for commissioning the asbestos survey were also identified. The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system. Though ASA-trained managers' instinctive thoughts on asbestos were of a slightly poorer technical quality compared with those of non-ASA-trained managers, they were still significantly more cognisant of their responsibilities towards those of their employees at specific risk of asbestos exposure. Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings. Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Managers’ instinctive thoughts on asbestos in the context of the categorisation oftheir ‘first word or phrase’ response. The number of managers per category of responseis displayed beside each shaded bar. This number is also expressed as a percentage ofthe total number (n) of managers in that cohort, where n=11 for ASA-trained managersand n=19 for non-ASA-trained managers. p=1.00, Fisher’s exact testfor significant association between the articulation of a higher or lower ordertechnical response and a manager being ASA-trained.
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fig_003: Managers’ instinctive thoughts on asbestos in the context of the categorisation oftheir ‘first word or phrase’ response. The number of managers per category of responseis displayed beside each shaded bar. This number is also expressed as a percentage ofthe total number (n) of managers in that cohort, where n=11 for ASA-trained managersand n=19 for non-ASA-trained managers. p=1.00, Fisher’s exact testfor significant association between the articulation of a higher or lower ordertechnical response and a manager being ASA-trained.

Mentions: Managers’ instinctive thoughts on asbestos were examined via analysis of their responses tothe open-ended question “What is the first word or phrase that comes to mind when you hearthe word ‘asbestos’?” This analysis was facilitated by coding their various ‘first word orphrase’ responses as follows. Responses which contained clear and specific reference tocancer(s) of the lungs were categorised as higher order technicalresponses, whereas those containing less specific technical information (such as ‘lungproblems’, ‘bad for your lungs’ and ‘dangerous dusts’) were categorised as lowerorder technical responses. A third category comprised responses which alluded, ingeneral terms only, to the fact that asbestos was ‘dangerous’. A fourth category wascomprised of those responses which focused solely on issues pertaining to the management andcontrol of exposure to asbestos. A fifth category was provided for all other comments, ofwhich there was only one which related to a specific commercially available brand ofslate/roofing product. In the context of these five categories of responses, Fig. 3Fig. 3.


The extent and influence of Asbestos Safety Awareness training among managers who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings.

Hickey J, Saunders J, Davern P - Ind Health (2015)

Managers’ instinctive thoughts on asbestos in the context of the categorisation oftheir ‘first word or phrase’ response. The number of managers per category of responseis displayed beside each shaded bar. This number is also expressed as a percentage ofthe total number (n) of managers in that cohort, where n=11 for ASA-trained managersand n=19 for non-ASA-trained managers. p=1.00, Fisher’s exact testfor significant association between the articulation of a higher or lower ordertechnical response and a manager being ASA-trained.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591132&req=5

fig_003: Managers’ instinctive thoughts on asbestos in the context of the categorisation oftheir ‘first word or phrase’ response. The number of managers per category of responseis displayed beside each shaded bar. This number is also expressed as a percentage ofthe total number (n) of managers in that cohort, where n=11 for ASA-trained managersand n=19 for non-ASA-trained managers. p=1.00, Fisher’s exact testfor significant association between the articulation of a higher or lower ordertechnical response and a manager being ASA-trained.
Mentions: Managers’ instinctive thoughts on asbestos were examined via analysis of their responses tothe open-ended question “What is the first word or phrase that comes to mind when you hearthe word ‘asbestos’?” This analysis was facilitated by coding their various ‘first word orphrase’ responses as follows. Responses which contained clear and specific reference tocancer(s) of the lungs were categorised as higher order technicalresponses, whereas those containing less specific technical information (such as ‘lungproblems’, ‘bad for your lungs’ and ‘dangerous dusts’) were categorised as lowerorder technical responses. A third category comprised responses which alluded, ingeneral terms only, to the fact that asbestos was ‘dangerous’. A fourth category wascomprised of those responses which focused solely on issues pertaining to the management andcontrol of exposure to asbestos. A fifth category was provided for all other comments, ofwhich there was only one which related to a specific commercially available brand ofslate/roofing product. In the context of these five categories of responses, Fig. 3Fig. 3.

Bottom Line: The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system.Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings.Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chemical & Environmental Sciences Department, University of Limerick, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
A telephone survey was conducted among a sample of managers (n=30) in Ireland who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings. The aims of the telephone survey were to examine the extent to which managers had completed Asbestos Safety Awareness (ASA) training, and to assess how such training might influence (i) their instinctive thoughts on asbestos, and (ii) their approach to aspects of asbestos management within their buildings. Managers' motivations for commissioning the asbestos survey were also identified. The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system. Though ASA-trained managers' instinctive thoughts on asbestos were of a slightly poorer technical quality compared with those of non-ASA-trained managers, they were still significantly more cognisant of their responsibilities towards those of their employees at specific risk of asbestos exposure. Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings. Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus