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The extent and influence of Asbestos Safety Awareness training among managers who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings.

Hickey J, Saunders J, Davern P - Ind Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system.Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings.Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chemical & Environmental Sciences Department, University of Limerick, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
A telephone survey was conducted among a sample of managers (n=30) in Ireland who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings. The aims of the telephone survey were to examine the extent to which managers had completed Asbestos Safety Awareness (ASA) training, and to assess how such training might influence (i) their instinctive thoughts on asbestos, and (ii) their approach to aspects of asbestos management within their buildings. Managers' motivations for commissioning the asbestos survey were also identified. The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system. Though ASA-trained managers' instinctive thoughts on asbestos were of a slightly poorer technical quality compared with those of non-ASA-trained managers, they were still significantly more cognisant of their responsibilities towards those of their employees at specific risk of asbestos exposure. Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings. Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The extent to which managers had completed ASA training in the context oforganisation size. The number of managers per organisation size is displayed besideeach shaded bar. This number is also expressed as a percentage of the total number (n)of managers in that cohort, where n=11 for ASA-trained managers and n=19 fornon-ASA-trained managers. p=0.796, Fisher’s exact test forsignificant association between organisation size and a manager being ASA-trained.
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fig_001: The extent to which managers had completed ASA training in the context oforganisation size. The number of managers per organisation size is displayed besideeach shaded bar. This number is also expressed as a percentage of the total number (n)of managers in that cohort, where n=11 for ASA-trained managers and n=19 fornon-ASA-trained managers. p=0.796, Fisher’s exact test forsignificant association between organisation size and a manager being ASA-trained.

Mentions: Tables 1Table 1.Organisational characteristics pertaining to the study sample of buildingmanagers according to industrial sectorIndustrial sectorNo. of organisations (%)Agriculture3 (10%)Chemical production3 (10%)Construction4 (13.3%)Education2 (6.7%)Engineering0 (0%)Financial services1 (3.3%)Food production1 (3.3%)Health services9 (30%)Information Technology0 (0%)Local government authority2 (6.7%)Manufacturing0 (0%)Pharmaceutical production1 (3.3%)Retail4 (13.3%)Other0 (0%)Total30 and 2Table 2.Organisational characteristics pertaining to the study sample of buildingmanagers according to number of employees and management system accreditationstatusNumber of employeesNumber and percentage of organisationsNumber and percentage of organisations operating an accreditedmanagement system1−207 (23.3%)0 out of 7 (0%)21−1009 (30.0%)2 out of 9 (22.2%)101−2005 (16.7%)4 out of 5 (80%)>2009 (30.0%)8 out of 9 (88.9%)Total30 (100%)14 out of 30 (46.7%) display information on the organisational characteristics pertaining to thestudy sample of building managers who agreed to participate in the survey (n=30).Participants were spread across a range of organisational sizes and sectors, with just underhalf of the organisations (46.7%, n=14) operating an accredited management system. Thehealth services sector was particularly well represented (n=9, 30%). This may relate to theparticular age profile of hospital buildings in Ireland which is likely to predispose themto the presence of ACMs. In this context, Version 1 (2006) of the Corporate Safety Statementfor Ireland’s Health Service Executive (the statutory body responsible for the provision ofpublic health services in Ireland) included asbestos on a short yet specific list ofworkplace hazards deemed particularly worthy of attention in the context of riskassessment20). (The current version ofthis document, Version 4, is written to a revised format and, as such, no longer includesthis list21)). Of the total sample of 30managers, 11 (36.7%) confirmed that they had previously completed ASA training, with theremaining 19 (63.3%) being non-ASA-trained. The extent to which managers were ASA-trainedwas analysed versus (i) the size of their organisation, and (ii) whether or not theirorganisation operated an accredited management system, for example ISO 9001, etc. Thesummary of these analyses is presented in Figs. 1Fig. 1.


The extent and influence of Asbestos Safety Awareness training among managers who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings.

Hickey J, Saunders J, Davern P - Ind Health (2015)

The extent to which managers had completed ASA training in the context oforganisation size. The number of managers per organisation size is displayed besideeach shaded bar. This number is also expressed as a percentage of the total number (n)of managers in that cohort, where n=11 for ASA-trained managers and n=19 fornon-ASA-trained managers. p=0.796, Fisher’s exact test forsignificant association between organisation size and a manager being ASA-trained.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4591132&req=5

fig_001: The extent to which managers had completed ASA training in the context oforganisation size. The number of managers per organisation size is displayed besideeach shaded bar. This number is also expressed as a percentage of the total number (n)of managers in that cohort, where n=11 for ASA-trained managers and n=19 fornon-ASA-trained managers. p=0.796, Fisher’s exact test forsignificant association between organisation size and a manager being ASA-trained.
Mentions: Tables 1Table 1.Organisational characteristics pertaining to the study sample of buildingmanagers according to industrial sectorIndustrial sectorNo. of organisations (%)Agriculture3 (10%)Chemical production3 (10%)Construction4 (13.3%)Education2 (6.7%)Engineering0 (0%)Financial services1 (3.3%)Food production1 (3.3%)Health services9 (30%)Information Technology0 (0%)Local government authority2 (6.7%)Manufacturing0 (0%)Pharmaceutical production1 (3.3%)Retail4 (13.3%)Other0 (0%)Total30 and 2Table 2.Organisational characteristics pertaining to the study sample of buildingmanagers according to number of employees and management system accreditationstatusNumber of employeesNumber and percentage of organisationsNumber and percentage of organisations operating an accreditedmanagement system1−207 (23.3%)0 out of 7 (0%)21−1009 (30.0%)2 out of 9 (22.2%)101−2005 (16.7%)4 out of 5 (80%)>2009 (30.0%)8 out of 9 (88.9%)Total30 (100%)14 out of 30 (46.7%) display information on the organisational characteristics pertaining to thestudy sample of building managers who agreed to participate in the survey (n=30).Participants were spread across a range of organisational sizes and sectors, with just underhalf of the organisations (46.7%, n=14) operating an accredited management system. Thehealth services sector was particularly well represented (n=9, 30%). This may relate to theparticular age profile of hospital buildings in Ireland which is likely to predispose themto the presence of ACMs. In this context, Version 1 (2006) of the Corporate Safety Statementfor Ireland’s Health Service Executive (the statutory body responsible for the provision ofpublic health services in Ireland) included asbestos on a short yet specific list ofworkplace hazards deemed particularly worthy of attention in the context of riskassessment20). (The current version ofthis document, Version 4, is written to a revised format and, as such, no longer includesthis list21)). Of the total sample of 30managers, 11 (36.7%) confirmed that they had previously completed ASA training, with theremaining 19 (63.3%) being non-ASA-trained. The extent to which managers were ASA-trainedwas analysed versus (i) the size of their organisation, and (ii) whether or not theirorganisation operated an accredited management system, for example ISO 9001, etc. Thesummary of these analyses is presented in Figs. 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system.Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings.Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Chemical & Environmental Sciences Department, University of Limerick, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
A telephone survey was conducted among a sample of managers (n=30) in Ireland who had previously commissioned an asbestos survey in their workplace buildings. The aims of the telephone survey were to examine the extent to which managers had completed Asbestos Safety Awareness (ASA) training, and to assess how such training might influence (i) their instinctive thoughts on asbestos, and (ii) their approach to aspects of asbestos management within their buildings. Managers' motivations for commissioning the asbestos survey were also identified. The study found that ASA-trained managers (n=11) were not significantly more likely to work in larger organisations or in organisations which operated an accredited management system. Though ASA-trained managers' instinctive thoughts on asbestos were of a slightly poorer technical quality compared with those of non-ASA-trained managers, they were still significantly more cognisant of their responsibilities towards those of their employees at specific risk of asbestos exposure. Most managers (n=28) commissioned the asbestos survey to satisfy a pre-requisite of external contractors for commencing refurbishment/demolition work in their buildings. Given its potential to positively influence the occupational management of asbestos, the authors recommend the general promotion of suitably tailored ASA-training programmes among building managers and external contractors alike.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus