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Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

Hanasono MM - Adv Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades.More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance.The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 443, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible.

No MeSH data available.


Design of a facial artery musculomucosal pedicled flap for a lateral floor of mouth and mandibular gingival defect (a). The flap is elevated and includes a portion of the buccinator muscle and the facial artery, which is deep to the muscle (b). Postoperative appearance (c).
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fig8: Design of a facial artery musculomucosal pedicled flap for a lateral floor of mouth and mandibular gingival defect (a). The flap is elevated and includes a portion of the buccinator muscle and the facial artery, which is deep to the muscle (b). Postoperative appearance (c).

Mentions: Small defects of the floor of mouth with bone exposure can be repaired with a facial artery musculomucosal (FAMM) flap (Figure 8). The FAMM flap is based on the facial artery and includes a portion of the buccinator muscle in addition to the buccal mucosa and is usually useful for small defects up to about 2 cm in width that enable primary closure of the donor site [59–61]. The blood supply to the FAMM flap is the facial artery. When elevating a FAMM flap, a small amount of buccinator muscle is included in the flap, along with the buccal mucosa and the facial artery. Venous drainage depends mainly on the buccal venous plexus. The FAMM flap can be superiorly based on the angular artery to repair palatal defects but needs to be inferiorly based on the main facial artery in order to be rotated to the floor of the mouth. Prior to elevation, a handheld Doppler ultrasound is used to trace the course of the facial artery. The width of the flap is limited by the amount of laxity in the buccal mucosa that allows primary closure of the donor site, usually around 2 cm.


Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

Hanasono MM - Adv Med (2014)

Design of a facial artery musculomucosal pedicled flap for a lateral floor of mouth and mandibular gingival defect (a). The flap is elevated and includes a portion of the buccinator muscle and the facial artery, which is deep to the muscle (b). Postoperative appearance (c).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590972&req=5

fig8: Design of a facial artery musculomucosal pedicled flap for a lateral floor of mouth and mandibular gingival defect (a). The flap is elevated and includes a portion of the buccinator muscle and the facial artery, which is deep to the muscle (b). Postoperative appearance (c).
Mentions: Small defects of the floor of mouth with bone exposure can be repaired with a facial artery musculomucosal (FAMM) flap (Figure 8). The FAMM flap is based on the facial artery and includes a portion of the buccinator muscle in addition to the buccal mucosa and is usually useful for small defects up to about 2 cm in width that enable primary closure of the donor site [59–61]. The blood supply to the FAMM flap is the facial artery. When elevating a FAMM flap, a small amount of buccinator muscle is included in the flap, along with the buccal mucosa and the facial artery. Venous drainage depends mainly on the buccal venous plexus. The FAMM flap can be superiorly based on the angular artery to repair palatal defects but needs to be inferiorly based on the main facial artery in order to be rotated to the floor of the mouth. Prior to elevation, a handheld Doppler ultrasound is used to trace the course of the facial artery. The width of the flap is limited by the amount of laxity in the buccal mucosa that allows primary closure of the donor site, usually around 2 cm.

Bottom Line: The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades.More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance.The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 443, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible.

No MeSH data available.