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Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

Hanasono MM - Adv Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades.More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance.The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 443, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Composite anterior mandibular resection for a large invasive floor of mouth cancer (a). Skin markings for a fibula osteocutaneous free flap (b). Approximately 5 to 7 cm of proximal and distal bone are left in situ (c). Osteotomies for shaping the fibula can be made prior to or after pedicle division (d). Fibula osteocutaneous free flap after rigid fixation with a titanium reconstruction plate (e). Flap inset (f).
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fig4: Composite anterior mandibular resection for a large invasive floor of mouth cancer (a). Skin markings for a fibula osteocutaneous free flap (b). Approximately 5 to 7 cm of proximal and distal bone are left in situ (c). Osteotomies for shaping the fibula can be made prior to or after pedicle division (d). Fibula osteocutaneous free flap after rigid fixation with a titanium reconstruction plate (e). Flap inset (f).

Mentions: The fibula osteocutaneous flap is probably the most frequently used choice for mandibular reconstruction (Figure 4) [32, 33]. The fibula bone is primarily an ankle stabilizer and provides the origin for several muscles of the lower leg but is expendable provided that the distal several centimeters of the bone, including the lateral malleolus, are spared. A 22 to 25 centimeters segment of fibula bone may be harvested in the adult patient, permitting reconstruction of near-total mandibular defects with a single flap.


Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

Hanasono MM - Adv Med (2014)

Composite anterior mandibular resection for a large invasive floor of mouth cancer (a). Skin markings for a fibula osteocutaneous free flap (b). Approximately 5 to 7 cm of proximal and distal bone are left in situ (c). Osteotomies for shaping the fibula can be made prior to or after pedicle division (d). Fibula osteocutaneous free flap after rigid fixation with a titanium reconstruction plate (e). Flap inset (f).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590972&req=5

fig4: Composite anterior mandibular resection for a large invasive floor of mouth cancer (a). Skin markings for a fibula osteocutaneous free flap (b). Approximately 5 to 7 cm of proximal and distal bone are left in situ (c). Osteotomies for shaping the fibula can be made prior to or after pedicle division (d). Fibula osteocutaneous free flap after rigid fixation with a titanium reconstruction plate (e). Flap inset (f).
Mentions: The fibula osteocutaneous flap is probably the most frequently used choice for mandibular reconstruction (Figure 4) [32, 33]. The fibula bone is primarily an ankle stabilizer and provides the origin for several muscles of the lower leg but is expendable provided that the distal several centimeters of the bone, including the lateral malleolus, are spared. A 22 to 25 centimeters segment of fibula bone may be harvested in the adult patient, permitting reconstruction of near-total mandibular defects with a single flap.

Bottom Line: The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades.More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance.The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 443, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

ABSTRACT
The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus