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Presumed Virus-Induced Punctal Occlusion.

Yulish M, Pikkel J - Adv Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Results.PCR testing was negative for all the viruses examined; however, nested PCR was positive in three patients.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Ziv Medical Center, Safed, Israel ; Bar-Ilan Faculty of Medicine, Safed, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. To investigate viral infection as a cause of punctal stenosis in individuals without any ocular or systemic risk factors. Methods. The study group comprised patients with no known cause for punctal occlusion who underwent surgery at one medical center during a one-year period. Excised tissue was subjected to histological examination, PCR, and nested PCR testing for common viruses (adenovirus, influenza A and B, enterovirus, varicella-zoster, CMV, herpes simplex types 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, and parainfluenza type 1). Results. All nine patients identified were female, 20-38 years of age. The three-snip-procedure resolved tearing in eight of them. All excised samples showed chronic mononuclear inflammation compatible with viral infection or with viral infection immune inflammatory reaction. PCR testing was negative for all the viruses examined; however, nested PCR was positive in three patients. Conclusion. This study supports the proposition that punctal occlusion in young healthy females may be due to viral infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histopathology of excised tissue. A: squamous epithelium of eyelid skin (epidermis) with no inflammation, B: goblet cells, and C: lichenoid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction in the conjunctival side of eyelid.
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fig1: Histopathology of excised tissue. A: squamous epithelium of eyelid skin (epidermis) with no inflammation, B: goblet cells, and C: lichenoid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction in the conjunctival side of eyelid.

Mentions: All the samples showed chronic mononuclear inflammation compatible with viral infection or with viral infection immune inflammatory reaction (Figures 1 and 2). PCR testing was negative for all the viruses examined; however, nested PCR showed evidence of prior viral infection in three patients (two due to adenovirus and one due to influenza). Results of the nested PCR are shown in Figure 3. For these patients, the duration of symptoms of epiphora prior to surgery was 2-3 months, compared to 5 or more months for all the patients who tested negative.


Presumed Virus-Induced Punctal Occlusion.

Yulish M, Pikkel J - Adv Med (2014)

Histopathology of excised tissue. A: squamous epithelium of eyelid skin (epidermis) with no inflammation, B: goblet cells, and C: lichenoid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction in the conjunctival side of eyelid.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590959&req=5

fig1: Histopathology of excised tissue. A: squamous epithelium of eyelid skin (epidermis) with no inflammation, B: goblet cells, and C: lichenoid lymphocytic inflammatory reaction in the conjunctival side of eyelid.
Mentions: All the samples showed chronic mononuclear inflammation compatible with viral infection or with viral infection immune inflammatory reaction (Figures 1 and 2). PCR testing was negative for all the viruses examined; however, nested PCR showed evidence of prior viral infection in three patients (two due to adenovirus and one due to influenza). Results of the nested PCR are shown in Figure 3. For these patients, the duration of symptoms of epiphora prior to surgery was 2-3 months, compared to 5 or more months for all the patients who tested negative.

Bottom Line: Results.PCR testing was negative for all the viruses examined; however, nested PCR was positive in three patients.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Ziv Medical Center, Safed, Israel ; Bar-Ilan Faculty of Medicine, Safed, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. To investigate viral infection as a cause of punctal stenosis in individuals without any ocular or systemic risk factors. Methods. The study group comprised patients with no known cause for punctal occlusion who underwent surgery at one medical center during a one-year period. Excised tissue was subjected to histological examination, PCR, and nested PCR testing for common viruses (adenovirus, influenza A and B, enterovirus, varicella-zoster, CMV, herpes simplex types 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, and parainfluenza type 1). Results. All nine patients identified were female, 20-38 years of age. The three-snip-procedure resolved tearing in eight of them. All excised samples showed chronic mononuclear inflammation compatible with viral infection or with viral infection immune inflammatory reaction. PCR testing was negative for all the viruses examined; however, nested PCR was positive in three patients. Conclusion. This study supports the proposition that punctal occlusion in young healthy females may be due to viral infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus