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A Critical Analysis of Claims and Their Authenticity in Indian Drug Promotional Advertisements.

Randhawa GK, Singh NR, Rai J, Kaur G, Kashyap R - Adv Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Out of 209 claims from 50 advertisements, only 46% were found to be true, 21% false, 16% vague, 7% exaggerated, and 10% controversial in nature.Out of 111 (70%) retrievable references, 92 (83%) references were found valid.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, Government Medical College, Amritsar 143001, India.

ABSTRACT
Introduction. Drug promotional advertisements (DPAs) form a major marketing technique of pharmaceutical companies for promoting their products and disseminating ambiguous drug information which can affect prescribing pattern of physicians. Drug information includes product characteristics, various marketing claims with references in support to increase its credibility and authenticity. Material and Methods. An observational study was carried out on fifty printed drug advertisement brochures which were collected from different OPDs of Guru Nanak Dev Hospital attached to Government Medical College, Amritsar, India. These advertisements were analyzed and claims were categorized into true, false, exaggerated, vague, and controversial on criteria as reported by Rohraa et al. (2006). References of DPAs in support of the claims were critically analyzed for their retrievability from web and validity pertaining to claims. Results. Out of 209 claims from 50 advertisements, only 46% were found to be true, 21% false, 16% vague, 7% exaggerated, and 10% controversial in nature. Out of 160 references given in support of claims, 49 (30%) of references were irretrievable. Out of 111 (70%) retrievable references, 92 (83%) references were found valid. Conclusion. Drug information provided in the DPAs was biased, incomplete, unauthentic, and unreliable with references exhibiting questionable credibility.

No MeSH data available.


Classification of references as per retrievability pattern.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Classification of references as per retrievability pattern.

Mentions: Cited references in support of the claims were also analyzed based on their retrievability pattern and validity arrays. Out of 50 advertisements, fifteen (30%) advertisements were without any reference. A total of 160 references were found from 35 advertisements. On the basis of retrievability pattern of cited references, it was observed that 70% of references were retrievable and out of them 17% were invalid (Figure 3).


A Critical Analysis of Claims and Their Authenticity in Indian Drug Promotional Advertisements.

Randhawa GK, Singh NR, Rai J, Kaur G, Kashyap R - Adv Med (2015)

Classification of references as per retrievability pattern.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590952&req=5

fig3: Classification of references as per retrievability pattern.
Mentions: Cited references in support of the claims were also analyzed based on their retrievability pattern and validity arrays. Out of 50 advertisements, fifteen (30%) advertisements were without any reference. A total of 160 references were found from 35 advertisements. On the basis of retrievability pattern of cited references, it was observed that 70% of references were retrievable and out of them 17% were invalid (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Out of 209 claims from 50 advertisements, only 46% were found to be true, 21% false, 16% vague, 7% exaggerated, and 10% controversial in nature.Out of 111 (70%) retrievable references, 92 (83%) references were found valid.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, Government Medical College, Amritsar 143001, India.

ABSTRACT
Introduction. Drug promotional advertisements (DPAs) form a major marketing technique of pharmaceutical companies for promoting their products and disseminating ambiguous drug information which can affect prescribing pattern of physicians. Drug information includes product characteristics, various marketing claims with references in support to increase its credibility and authenticity. Material and Methods. An observational study was carried out on fifty printed drug advertisement brochures which were collected from different OPDs of Guru Nanak Dev Hospital attached to Government Medical College, Amritsar, India. These advertisements were analyzed and claims were categorized into true, false, exaggerated, vague, and controversial on criteria as reported by Rohraa et al. (2006). References of DPAs in support of the claims were critically analyzed for their retrievability from web and validity pertaining to claims. Results. Out of 209 claims from 50 advertisements, only 46% were found to be true, 21% false, 16% vague, 7% exaggerated, and 10% controversial in nature. Out of 160 references given in support of claims, 49 (30%) of references were irretrievable. Out of 111 (70%) retrievable references, 92 (83%) references were found valid. Conclusion. Drug information provided in the DPAs was biased, incomplete, unauthentic, and unreliable with references exhibiting questionable credibility.

No MeSH data available.