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Does Intensive Glucose Control Prevent Cognitive Decline in Diabetes? A Meta-Analysis.

Peñaherrera-Oviedo C, Moreno-Zambrano D, Palacios M, Duarte-Martinez MC, Cevallos C, Gamboa X, Jurado MB, Tamariz L, Palacio A, Santibañez R - Int J Chronic Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive decline and impaired performance in cognitive function tests among type 1 and type 2 diabetics.Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for each domain.We found that type 1 diabetics get no cognitive benefit from a tight glucose control, whereas type 2 diabetics get some benefit on processing speed and executive domains but had worse performances in the memory and attention domains, along with a higher incidence of mortality when using intensive glucose control regimes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidad Catolica de Santiago de Guayaquil, 090112 Guayas, Ecuador.

ABSTRACT
Diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive decline and impaired performance in cognitive function tests among type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Even though the use of tight glucose control has been limited by a reported higher mortality, few reports have assessed the impact of treatment intensity on cognitive function. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate if an intensive glucose control in diabetes improves cognitive function, in comparison to standard therapy. We included 7 studies that included type 1 or type 2 diabetics and used standardized tests to evaluate various cognitive function domains. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for each domain. We found that type 1 diabetics get no cognitive benefit from a tight glucose control, whereas type 2 diabetics get some benefit on processing speed and executive domains but had worse performances in the memory and attention domains, along with a higher incidence of mortality when using intensive glucose control regimes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary of database search conducted on PubMed and details of study selection.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Summary of database search conducted on PubMed and details of study selection.

Mentions: Our search strategy yielded 82 articles, from which we excluded 73 abstracts because they were not RCT or did not meet inclusion criteria. From the remaining 9 studies from the original search, we removed 3 more articles after exclusion criteria were applied. One additional study was retrieved from the references of the articles reviewed and was included for analysis as it did not meet exclusion criteria [16]. A total of 7 articles were finally included in the meta-analysis, of which 4 analyzed type 1 diabetics and 3 studied type 2 diabetics (Figure 1).


Does Intensive Glucose Control Prevent Cognitive Decline in Diabetes? A Meta-Analysis.

Peñaherrera-Oviedo C, Moreno-Zambrano D, Palacios M, Duarte-Martinez MC, Cevallos C, Gamboa X, Jurado MB, Tamariz L, Palacio A, Santibañez R - Int J Chronic Dis (2015)

Summary of database search conducted on PubMed and details of study selection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590930&req=5

fig1: Summary of database search conducted on PubMed and details of study selection.
Mentions: Our search strategy yielded 82 articles, from which we excluded 73 abstracts because they were not RCT or did not meet inclusion criteria. From the remaining 9 studies from the original search, we removed 3 more articles after exclusion criteria were applied. One additional study was retrieved from the references of the articles reviewed and was included for analysis as it did not meet exclusion criteria [16]. A total of 7 articles were finally included in the meta-analysis, of which 4 analyzed type 1 diabetics and 3 studied type 2 diabetics (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive decline and impaired performance in cognitive function tests among type 1 and type 2 diabetics.Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for each domain.We found that type 1 diabetics get no cognitive benefit from a tight glucose control, whereas type 2 diabetics get some benefit on processing speed and executive domains but had worse performances in the memory and attention domains, along with a higher incidence of mortality when using intensive glucose control regimes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidad Catolica de Santiago de Guayaquil, 090112 Guayas, Ecuador.

ABSTRACT
Diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive decline and impaired performance in cognitive function tests among type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Even though the use of tight glucose control has been limited by a reported higher mortality, few reports have assessed the impact of treatment intensity on cognitive function. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate if an intensive glucose control in diabetes improves cognitive function, in comparison to standard therapy. We included 7 studies that included type 1 or type 2 diabetics and used standardized tests to evaluate various cognitive function domains. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated for each domain. We found that type 1 diabetics get no cognitive benefit from a tight glucose control, whereas type 2 diabetics get some benefit on processing speed and executive domains but had worse performances in the memory and attention domains, along with a higher incidence of mortality when using intensive glucose control regimes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus