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Immediate Effects of Neurodynamic Sliding versus Muscle Stretching on Hamstring Flexibility in Subjects with Short Hamstring Syndrome.

Castellote-Caballero Y, Valenza MC, Puentedura EJ, Fernández-de-Las-Peñas C, Alburquerque-Sendín F - J Sports Med (Hindawi Publ Corp) (2014)

Bottom Line: Purpose.Data were analyzed with a 3 × 2 mixed model ANOVA followed by simple main effects analyses.Results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Servicio Andaluz de Salud, Avenida de las Fuerzas Armadas 2, 18014 Granada, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Background. Hamstring injuries continue to affect active individuals and although inadequate muscle extensibility remains a commonly accepted factor, little is known about the most effective method to improve flexibility. Purpose. To determine if an isolated neurodynamic sciatic sliding technique would improve hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than stretching or a placebo intervention in asymptomatic subjects with short hamstring syndrome (SHS). Study Design. Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Methods. One hundred and twenty subjects with SHS were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: neurodynamic sliding, hamstring stretching, and placebo control. Each subject's dominant leg was measured for straight leg raise (SLR) range of motion (ROM) before and after interventions. Data were analyzed with a 3 × 2 mixed model ANOVA followed by simple main effects analyses. Results. At the end of the study, more ROM was observed in the Neurodynamic and Stretching groups compared to the Control group and more ROM in the Neurodynamic group compared to Stretching group. Conclusion. Findings suggest that a neurodynamic sliding technique will increase hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than static hamstring stretching in healthy subjects with SHS. Clinical Relevance. The use of neurodynamic sliding techniques to improve hamstring flexibility in sports may lead to a decreased incidence in injuries; however, this needs to be formally tested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Static stretching of the hamstring muscles was performed for 30 seconds, 6 times on their dominant leg for a total stretching time of 180 seconds.
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fig3: Static stretching of the hamstring muscles was performed for 30 seconds, 6 times on their dominant leg for a total stretching time of 180 seconds.

Mentions: Subjects in the Stretching group received passive stretching of the hamstring muscles in their dominant leg. While lying supine, a researcher who was blinded to SLR test measures would passively position the subject into the SLR position (hip in flexion, knee in extension, and ankle in neutral) without pain/discomfort to the point where resistance to movement was first noted (Figure 3). This position was then maintained for 30 seconds [36, 37] and repeated further 5 times. During the 30 second stretches, the therapist monitored the subjects to ensure they did not make any compensation that could modify the stretching position. Each subject had a total of 180 seconds of stretching on their lower extremity.


Immediate Effects of Neurodynamic Sliding versus Muscle Stretching on Hamstring Flexibility in Subjects with Short Hamstring Syndrome.

Castellote-Caballero Y, Valenza MC, Puentedura EJ, Fernández-de-Las-Peñas C, Alburquerque-Sendín F - J Sports Med (Hindawi Publ Corp) (2014)

Static stretching of the hamstring muscles was performed for 30 seconds, 6 times on their dominant leg for a total stretching time of 180 seconds.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590905&req=5

fig3: Static stretching of the hamstring muscles was performed for 30 seconds, 6 times on their dominant leg for a total stretching time of 180 seconds.
Mentions: Subjects in the Stretching group received passive stretching of the hamstring muscles in their dominant leg. While lying supine, a researcher who was blinded to SLR test measures would passively position the subject into the SLR position (hip in flexion, knee in extension, and ankle in neutral) without pain/discomfort to the point where resistance to movement was first noted (Figure 3). This position was then maintained for 30 seconds [36, 37] and repeated further 5 times. During the 30 second stretches, the therapist monitored the subjects to ensure they did not make any compensation that could modify the stretching position. Each subject had a total of 180 seconds of stretching on their lower extremity.

Bottom Line: Purpose.Data were analyzed with a 3 × 2 mixed model ANOVA followed by simple main effects analyses.Results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Servicio Andaluz de Salud, Avenida de las Fuerzas Armadas 2, 18014 Granada, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Background. Hamstring injuries continue to affect active individuals and although inadequate muscle extensibility remains a commonly accepted factor, little is known about the most effective method to improve flexibility. Purpose. To determine if an isolated neurodynamic sciatic sliding technique would improve hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than stretching or a placebo intervention in asymptomatic subjects with short hamstring syndrome (SHS). Study Design. Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Methods. One hundred and twenty subjects with SHS were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: neurodynamic sliding, hamstring stretching, and placebo control. Each subject's dominant leg was measured for straight leg raise (SLR) range of motion (ROM) before and after interventions. Data were analyzed with a 3 × 2 mixed model ANOVA followed by simple main effects analyses. Results. At the end of the study, more ROM was observed in the Neurodynamic and Stretching groups compared to the Control group and more ROM in the Neurodynamic group compared to Stretching group. Conclusion. Findings suggest that a neurodynamic sliding technique will increase hamstring flexibility to a greater degree than static hamstring stretching in healthy subjects with SHS. Clinical Relevance. The use of neurodynamic sliding techniques to improve hamstring flexibility in sports may lead to a decreased incidence in injuries; however, this needs to be formally tested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus