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The Effect of Acute Rhodiola rosea Ingestion on Exercise Heart Rate, Substrate Utilisation, Mood State, and Perceptions of Exertion, Arousal, and Pleasure/Displeasure in Active Men.

Duncan MJ, Clarke ND - J Sports Med (Hindawi Publ Corp) (2014)

Bottom Line: Perceptions of arousal (P = 0.05) and pleasure were significantly higher after exercise with R. rosea compared to placebo (P = 0.003).Mood state scores for vigor were also higher in R. rosea condition compared to placebo (P = 0.008).There were no significant differences in energy expenditure, carbohydrate, or fat oxidation between conditions (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomolecular and Sports Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5HB, UK ; Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Biomolecular and Sports Sciences, Coventry University, James Starley Building, Priory Street, Coventry CV 5HB, UK.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of acute Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) ingestion on substrate utilisation, mood state, RPE, and exercise affect. Ten males (mean age ± S.D. = 26 ± 6 years) completed two 30-minute cycling trials at an intensity of 70% of [Formula: see text] following ingestion of either 3 mg·kg(-1) body mass of R. rosea or placebo using a double-blind, crossover design. During exercise, heart rate and RPE were recorded. Participants completed measures of mood state and exercise affect before and after exercise. Expired air samples were taken during exercise to determine substrate utilisation. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that RPE was significantly lower at 30 minutes into exercise versus placebo (P = 0.003). Perceptions of arousal (P = 0.05) and pleasure were significantly higher after exercise with R. rosea compared to placebo (P = 0.003). Mood state scores for vigor were also higher in R. rosea condition compared to placebo (P = 0.008). There were no significant differences in energy expenditure, carbohydrate, or fat oxidation between conditions (P > 0.05). Ingestion of R. rosea favourably influenced RPE and exercise affect without changes in energy expenditure or substrate utilization during 30-minute submaximal cycling performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean ± SE of perception of pleasure/displeasure before ingestion, after ingestion but before exercise, and after exercise between R. rosea and placebo conditions (*P = 0.003).
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fig2: Mean ± SE of perception of pleasure/displeasure before ingestion, after ingestion but before exercise, and after exercise between R. rosea and placebo conditions (*P = 0.003).

Mentions: Perceptions of arousal were also significantly different in the presence of R. rosea compared to placebo (F 1, 9 = 5.0, P = 0.05, Pη2 = 0.357) with scores for arousal being higher (3.1 ± 0.19) in the presence of R. rosea compared to placebo (2.8 ± 0.11). When data for feeling of pleasure/displeasure were assessed, there was however a significant condition × time effect (F 2, 18 = 12.795, P = 0.0001, Pη2 = 0.587, see Figure 2). This followed a similar pattern to RPE with no significant difference evident before ingestion (P = 0.591) or after ingestion but before exercise (P = 0.08). There was however significantly lower scores for pleasure after exercise in the placebo condition compared to the R. rosea condition (P = 0.003).


The Effect of Acute Rhodiola rosea Ingestion on Exercise Heart Rate, Substrate Utilisation, Mood State, and Perceptions of Exertion, Arousal, and Pleasure/Displeasure in Active Men.

Duncan MJ, Clarke ND - J Sports Med (Hindawi Publ Corp) (2014)

Mean ± SE of perception of pleasure/displeasure before ingestion, after ingestion but before exercise, and after exercise between R. rosea and placebo conditions (*P = 0.003).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590898&req=5

fig2: Mean ± SE of perception of pleasure/displeasure before ingestion, after ingestion but before exercise, and after exercise between R. rosea and placebo conditions (*P = 0.003).
Mentions: Perceptions of arousal were also significantly different in the presence of R. rosea compared to placebo (F 1, 9 = 5.0, P = 0.05, Pη2 = 0.357) with scores for arousal being higher (3.1 ± 0.19) in the presence of R. rosea compared to placebo (2.8 ± 0.11). When data for feeling of pleasure/displeasure were assessed, there was however a significant condition × time effect (F 2, 18 = 12.795, P = 0.0001, Pη2 = 0.587, see Figure 2). This followed a similar pattern to RPE with no significant difference evident before ingestion (P = 0.591) or after ingestion but before exercise (P = 0.08). There was however significantly lower scores for pleasure after exercise in the placebo condition compared to the R. rosea condition (P = 0.003).

Bottom Line: Perceptions of arousal (P = 0.05) and pleasure were significantly higher after exercise with R. rosea compared to placebo (P = 0.003).Mood state scores for vigor were also higher in R. rosea condition compared to placebo (P = 0.008).There were no significant differences in energy expenditure, carbohydrate, or fat oxidation between conditions (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomolecular and Sports Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5HB, UK ; Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Biomolecular and Sports Sciences, Coventry University, James Starley Building, Priory Street, Coventry CV 5HB, UK.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of acute Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) ingestion on substrate utilisation, mood state, RPE, and exercise affect. Ten males (mean age ± S.D. = 26 ± 6 years) completed two 30-minute cycling trials at an intensity of 70% of [Formula: see text] following ingestion of either 3 mg·kg(-1) body mass of R. rosea or placebo using a double-blind, crossover design. During exercise, heart rate and RPE were recorded. Participants completed measures of mood state and exercise affect before and after exercise. Expired air samples were taken during exercise to determine substrate utilisation. Repeated measures analysis of variance indicated that RPE was significantly lower at 30 minutes into exercise versus placebo (P = 0.003). Perceptions of arousal (P = 0.05) and pleasure were significantly higher after exercise with R. rosea compared to placebo (P = 0.003). Mood state scores for vigor were also higher in R. rosea condition compared to placebo (P = 0.008). There were no significant differences in energy expenditure, carbohydrate, or fat oxidation between conditions (P > 0.05). Ingestion of R. rosea favourably influenced RPE and exercise affect without changes in energy expenditure or substrate utilization during 30-minute submaximal cycling performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus