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Surgical Management of Penile and Preputial Neoplasms in Equine with Special Reference to Partial Phallectomy.

Rizk A, Mosbah E, Karrouf G, Abou Alsoud M - J Vet Med (2013)

Bottom Line: These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome.In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia.Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgery, Anaesthesiology and Radiology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, 35516 Dakahlia, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Penile and preputial neoplasia in horses occurs infrequently and represents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The present study was carried out on a total number of 21 equids (14 stallions and 7 donkeys) suffered from different penile and preputial neoplasia. Diagnosis of neoplasms was based up on history of the case, clinical examination as well as histopathological evaluation. Animals with penile and preputial neoplasms were underwent local excision and partial phallectomy with a slightly modified version of the techniques described by William's. The diagnosed neoplasms were penile and preputial squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; n = 15); sarcoid (n = 4); a-fibrosarcoma; and a melanoma. Local excision was curative in all cases except 5 stallions with SCCs. These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome. Follow-up information was obtained by visit and telephone inquiries. In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia. Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

No MeSH data available.


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Solitary, firm, nodular, and hairless melanotic melanoma (white arrow) at the prepuce of horse (a). The mass was surgically excised (white arrow; b). The mass after surgical excision (c). Melanotic melanoma showing intracytoplasmic dense brownish black pigment (melanin) which obscures the cellular details; besides, fibrous tissue trabeculae were seen among them (d) H & E, original magnification ×520.
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fig3: Solitary, firm, nodular, and hairless melanotic melanoma (white arrow) at the prepuce of horse (a). The mass was surgically excised (white arrow; b). The mass after surgical excision (c). Melanotic melanoma showing intracytoplasmic dense brownish black pigment (melanin) which obscures the cellular details; besides, fibrous tissue trabeculae were seen among them (d) H & E, original magnification ×520.

Mentions: A case of melanoma was detected in one stallion with SCC (the 2 neoplasms were in the same animal) who underwent partial amputation of the penis. It appeared as a solitary, firm, nodular, and hairless mass with intact skin at the prepuce (Figure 3(a)). The mass was surgically excised with successful outcome without recurrence one year after surgery (Figures 3(b) and 3(c)). Microscopically, the tumor characterized by a variety of cell patterns ranging from sheets to streams and nests of melanocytes shifts the diagnosis to a melanotic melanoma. Cell morphology varies from being epithelioid to spindle-shaped. Melanin pigmentation was mild and it was seen interspersed between the tumour cells (Figure 3(d)).


Surgical Management of Penile and Preputial Neoplasms in Equine with Special Reference to Partial Phallectomy.

Rizk A, Mosbah E, Karrouf G, Abou Alsoud M - J Vet Med (2013)

Solitary, firm, nodular, and hairless melanotic melanoma (white arrow) at the prepuce of horse (a). The mass was surgically excised (white arrow; b). The mass after surgical excision (c). Melanotic melanoma showing intracytoplasmic dense brownish black pigment (melanin) which obscures the cellular details; besides, fibrous tissue trabeculae were seen among them (d) H & E, original magnification ×520.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig3: Solitary, firm, nodular, and hairless melanotic melanoma (white arrow) at the prepuce of horse (a). The mass was surgically excised (white arrow; b). The mass after surgical excision (c). Melanotic melanoma showing intracytoplasmic dense brownish black pigment (melanin) which obscures the cellular details; besides, fibrous tissue trabeculae were seen among them (d) H & E, original magnification ×520.
Mentions: A case of melanoma was detected in one stallion with SCC (the 2 neoplasms were in the same animal) who underwent partial amputation of the penis. It appeared as a solitary, firm, nodular, and hairless mass with intact skin at the prepuce (Figure 3(a)). The mass was surgically excised with successful outcome without recurrence one year after surgery (Figures 3(b) and 3(c)). Microscopically, the tumor characterized by a variety of cell patterns ranging from sheets to streams and nests of melanocytes shifts the diagnosis to a melanotic melanoma. Cell morphology varies from being epithelioid to spindle-shaped. Melanin pigmentation was mild and it was seen interspersed between the tumour cells (Figure 3(d)).

Bottom Line: These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome.In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia.Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgery, Anaesthesiology and Radiology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, 35516 Dakahlia, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Penile and preputial neoplasia in horses occurs infrequently and represents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The present study was carried out on a total number of 21 equids (14 stallions and 7 donkeys) suffered from different penile and preputial neoplasia. Diagnosis of neoplasms was based up on history of the case, clinical examination as well as histopathological evaluation. Animals with penile and preputial neoplasms were underwent local excision and partial phallectomy with a slightly modified version of the techniques described by William's. The diagnosed neoplasms were penile and preputial squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; n = 15); sarcoid (n = 4); a-fibrosarcoma; and a melanoma. Local excision was curative in all cases except 5 stallions with SCCs. These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome. Follow-up information was obtained by visit and telephone inquiries. In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia. Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus