Limits...
Surgical Management of Penile and Preputial Neoplasms in Equine with Special Reference to Partial Phallectomy.

Rizk A, Mosbah E, Karrouf G, Abou Alsoud M - J Vet Med (2013)

Bottom Line: These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome.In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia.Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgery, Anaesthesiology and Radiology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, 35516 Dakahlia, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Penile and preputial neoplasia in horses occurs infrequently and represents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The present study was carried out on a total number of 21 equids (14 stallions and 7 donkeys) suffered from different penile and preputial neoplasia. Diagnosis of neoplasms was based up on history of the case, clinical examination as well as histopathological evaluation. Animals with penile and preputial neoplasms were underwent local excision and partial phallectomy with a slightly modified version of the techniques described by William's. The diagnosed neoplasms were penile and preputial squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; n = 15); sarcoid (n = 4); a-fibrosarcoma; and a melanoma. Local excision was curative in all cases except 5 stallions with SCCs. These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome. Follow-up information was obtained by visit and telephone inquiries. In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia. Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fibroblastic sarcoid on the prepuce of a donkey (a & b). The mass after surgical excision (c). Micrograph for sarcoids in donkeys showing hyperplasia of the epithelium, elongation of rete pegs, ulceration of the epithelium, inflammatory cell infiltration, and thrombosis and fibromatous growth in the dermis (d) H & E., original magnification ×400.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590862&req=5

fig2: Fibroblastic sarcoid on the prepuce of a donkey (a & b). The mass after surgical excision (c). Micrograph for sarcoids in donkeys showing hyperplasia of the epithelium, elongation of rete pegs, ulceration of the epithelium, inflammatory cell infiltration, and thrombosis and fibromatous growth in the dermis (d) H & E., original magnification ×400.

Mentions: Penile fibrosarcoma was diagnosed in a stallion representing 4.7% of the total neoplastic cases. Examination of the penis revealed a large ulcerated soft tissue mass on the shaft of the penis. Microscopically, tumor cells showed mesenchymal origin characterized by spindle cells in nodular whorls or streams and bundles, high nuclear to cytoplasm ratio, and oddly shaped large nuclei, without inflammatory component and necrosis. Successful outcome was obtained after local excision without recurrence 13 months after surgery. Penile and preputial sarcoids were detected in 2 donkeys and 2 horses with an average age (2–5 years) and representing 19.2% of the total neoplastic cases. They appeared singular or multiple cauliflower like growths (Figures 2(a), 2(b) and 2(c)). Microscopically, there was a classical streaming and interlacing spindle cell population, and “picketfence” appearance, at the epithelial interface, and long, thin, dissecting rete ridges are typical characteristic features to equine sarcoids (Figure 2(d)). Three operated animals showed no recurrence of the masses after local excision while one donkey showed recurrence 3 months after surgery which appeared smaller in size than the former one. Surgical excision was performed for a second time with successful recovery without recurrence 9 months after surgery.


Surgical Management of Penile and Preputial Neoplasms in Equine with Special Reference to Partial Phallectomy.

Rizk A, Mosbah E, Karrouf G, Abou Alsoud M - J Vet Med (2013)

Fibroblastic sarcoid on the prepuce of a donkey (a & b). The mass after surgical excision (c). Micrograph for sarcoids in donkeys showing hyperplasia of the epithelium, elongation of rete pegs, ulceration of the epithelium, inflammatory cell infiltration, and thrombosis and fibromatous growth in the dermis (d) H & E., original magnification ×400.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590862&req=5

fig2: Fibroblastic sarcoid on the prepuce of a donkey (a & b). The mass after surgical excision (c). Micrograph for sarcoids in donkeys showing hyperplasia of the epithelium, elongation of rete pegs, ulceration of the epithelium, inflammatory cell infiltration, and thrombosis and fibromatous growth in the dermis (d) H & E., original magnification ×400.
Mentions: Penile fibrosarcoma was diagnosed in a stallion representing 4.7% of the total neoplastic cases. Examination of the penis revealed a large ulcerated soft tissue mass on the shaft of the penis. Microscopically, tumor cells showed mesenchymal origin characterized by spindle cells in nodular whorls or streams and bundles, high nuclear to cytoplasm ratio, and oddly shaped large nuclei, without inflammatory component and necrosis. Successful outcome was obtained after local excision without recurrence 13 months after surgery. Penile and preputial sarcoids were detected in 2 donkeys and 2 horses with an average age (2–5 years) and representing 19.2% of the total neoplastic cases. They appeared singular or multiple cauliflower like growths (Figures 2(a), 2(b) and 2(c)). Microscopically, there was a classical streaming and interlacing spindle cell population, and “picketfence” appearance, at the epithelial interface, and long, thin, dissecting rete ridges are typical characteristic features to equine sarcoids (Figure 2(d)). Three operated animals showed no recurrence of the masses after local excision while one donkey showed recurrence 3 months after surgery which appeared smaller in size than the former one. Surgical excision was performed for a second time with successful recovery without recurrence 9 months after surgery.

Bottom Line: These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome.In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia.Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgery, Anaesthesiology and Radiology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, 35516 Dakahlia, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Penile and preputial neoplasia in horses occurs infrequently and represents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The present study was carried out on a total number of 21 equids (14 stallions and 7 donkeys) suffered from different penile and preputial neoplasia. Diagnosis of neoplasms was based up on history of the case, clinical examination as well as histopathological evaluation. Animals with penile and preputial neoplasms were underwent local excision and partial phallectomy with a slightly modified version of the techniques described by William's. The diagnosed neoplasms were penile and preputial squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; n = 15); sarcoid (n = 4); a-fibrosarcoma; and a melanoma. Local excision was curative in all cases except 5 stallions with SCCs. These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome. Follow-up information was obtained by visit and telephone inquiries. In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia. Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus