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Surgical Management of Penile and Preputial Neoplasms in Equine with Special Reference to Partial Phallectomy.

Rizk A, Mosbah E, Karrouf G, Abou Alsoud M - J Vet Med (2013)

Bottom Line: These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome.In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia.Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgery, Anaesthesiology and Radiology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, 35516 Dakahlia, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Penile and preputial neoplasia in horses occurs infrequently and represents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The present study was carried out on a total number of 21 equids (14 stallions and 7 donkeys) suffered from different penile and preputial neoplasia. Diagnosis of neoplasms was based up on history of the case, clinical examination as well as histopathological evaluation. Animals with penile and preputial neoplasms were underwent local excision and partial phallectomy with a slightly modified version of the techniques described by William's. The diagnosed neoplasms were penile and preputial squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; n = 15); sarcoid (n = 4); a-fibrosarcoma; and a melanoma. Local excision was curative in all cases except 5 stallions with SCCs. These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome. Follow-up information was obtained by visit and telephone inquiries. In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia. Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cauliflower-like SCC at the glans penis of horse (white arrow). The incised edges of the urethral mucosa were opposed to the epithelial edges of the sides of the triangle with simple continuous suture (white arrow; b). Stroma of partial phallectomy (c). Histological structure of SCCs showing small aggregates, irregular islands, and nests of neoplastic keratinocytes (black arrow) that proliferate downward from the epidermis and invade the subepithelial stroma of the dermis (H & E ×400).
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fig1: Cauliflower-like SCC at the glans penis of horse (white arrow). The incised edges of the urethral mucosa were opposed to the epithelial edges of the sides of the triangle with simple continuous suture (white arrow; b). Stroma of partial phallectomy (c). Histological structure of SCCs showing small aggregates, irregular islands, and nests of neoplastic keratinocytes (black arrow) that proliferate downward from the epidermis and invade the subepithelial stroma of the dermis (H & E ×400).

Mentions: A triangular incision (base 3 cms and sides 5 cms) was made through the penile skin on the ventral midline of the penis, with the apex pointing in a proximal direction. The base of the triangle was proximal to corona glandis and it was the site of penile transection. This triangle was bluntly dissected. A longitudinal incision was made into the urethra from the apex to the base of the triangle. The incised edges of the urethral mucosa were opposed to the epithelial edges of the sides of the triangle with simple continuous sutures (Figure 1(b)) using polydiaxanone no. 0 (PDS, Braun-Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany). The base of the triangle was left unsutured. The urethral catheter was removed, and the penis was obliquely transected at the base of the triangle in a craniodorsal direction (Figure 1(c)). The tunica albuginea of the dorsum of the corpus cavernosum penis was sutured to the tunical albuginea of the urethral groove with equidistant simple interrupted sutures using PDS no 0. The urethral mucosa was sutured to the penile epithelium with simple interrupted sutures using the same suture material. Open covered castration was performed in these 5 stallions at the same time of surgery.


Surgical Management of Penile and Preputial Neoplasms in Equine with Special Reference to Partial Phallectomy.

Rizk A, Mosbah E, Karrouf G, Abou Alsoud M - J Vet Med (2013)

Cauliflower-like SCC at the glans penis of horse (white arrow). The incised edges of the urethral mucosa were opposed to the epithelial edges of the sides of the triangle with simple continuous suture (white arrow; b). Stroma of partial phallectomy (c). Histological structure of SCCs showing small aggregates, irregular islands, and nests of neoplastic keratinocytes (black arrow) that proliferate downward from the epidermis and invade the subepithelial stroma of the dermis (H & E ×400).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4590862&req=5

fig1: Cauliflower-like SCC at the glans penis of horse (white arrow). The incised edges of the urethral mucosa were opposed to the epithelial edges of the sides of the triangle with simple continuous suture (white arrow; b). Stroma of partial phallectomy (c). Histological structure of SCCs showing small aggregates, irregular islands, and nests of neoplastic keratinocytes (black arrow) that proliferate downward from the epidermis and invade the subepithelial stroma of the dermis (H & E ×400).
Mentions: A triangular incision (base 3 cms and sides 5 cms) was made through the penile skin on the ventral midline of the penis, with the apex pointing in a proximal direction. The base of the triangle was proximal to corona glandis and it was the site of penile transection. This triangle was bluntly dissected. A longitudinal incision was made into the urethra from the apex to the base of the triangle. The incised edges of the urethral mucosa were opposed to the epithelial edges of the sides of the triangle with simple continuous sutures (Figure 1(b)) using polydiaxanone no. 0 (PDS, Braun-Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany). The base of the triangle was left unsutured. The urethral catheter was removed, and the penis was obliquely transected at the base of the triangle in a craniodorsal direction (Figure 1(c)). The tunica albuginea of the dorsum of the corpus cavernosum penis was sutured to the tunical albuginea of the urethral groove with equidistant simple interrupted sutures using PDS no 0. The urethral mucosa was sutured to the penile epithelium with simple interrupted sutures using the same suture material. Open covered castration was performed in these 5 stallions at the same time of surgery.

Bottom Line: These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome.In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia.Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Surgery, Anaesthesiology and Radiology Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, 35516 Dakahlia, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Penile and preputial neoplasia in horses occurs infrequently and represents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The present study was carried out on a total number of 21 equids (14 stallions and 7 donkeys) suffered from different penile and preputial neoplasia. Diagnosis of neoplasms was based up on history of the case, clinical examination as well as histopathological evaluation. Animals with penile and preputial neoplasms were underwent local excision and partial phallectomy with a slightly modified version of the techniques described by William's. The diagnosed neoplasms were penile and preputial squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; n = 15); sarcoid (n = 4); a-fibrosarcoma; and a melanoma. Local excision was curative in all cases except 5 stallions with SCCs. These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome. Follow-up information was obtained by visit and telephone inquiries. In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia. Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus